Author Topic: cad softweare  (Read 4810 times)

Offline richard westerfield

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cad softweare
« on: April 02, 2015, 10:15:40 AM »
can some one tell me of a good cad software that's easy to learn the ones I've seen  are useless they assume you already know what they are talking about I am looing for something like cut 2 I know its not a cad software but some thing like that style
thank you
Richard

Offline vtsteam

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2015, 10:26:04 AM »
It's not probably what most would call "good CAD software" but you can do a whole lot with it and I fnd it's much more intuitive to learn than a more conventionally interfaced high powered CAD, and that is SketchUP. At least the older versions (Google, 7 and 8) that I use are.

I do use quite a few plugins to extend its capabilities beyond what the limited free edition provided. I think that's one of its best features -- extendability by free 3rd party plugins.

Of course asking what a "good" CAD is, even an easy one, is bound to provide a lot of responses, and I'm sure this won't be an exception!  :beer:
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
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Offline David Jupp

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2015, 12:11:12 PM »
If you are looking for 3D CAD - I'd suggest Geomagic Design (or if cost is an issue, the cut down version Cubify Design which still has good capabilities).

There is a free trial available, and more importantly free training videos
http://support1.geomagic.com/link/portal/5605/5668/Article/2285/Geomagic-Design-Support-Video-Learning-Center

There are also some built in tutorials.

There are quite a few other 3D and 2D options - am sure you'll get plenty of suggestions.

Offline sparky961

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2015, 04:32:46 PM »
My answer is always the same to this one, though most people who don't use it for business don't like my answer due to the cost.  Hands down, I'm a SolidWorks convert.

There are quite a few other 3d parametric modeling packages out there.  To name a few:
  • Inventor
  • Rhino
  • ProEngineer
  • SolidEdge

There are similar concepts throughout, so picking up another one at some point isn't a huge deal.  These days, a 2D package isn't very useful.  You are likely to quickly outgrow it or be frustrated by its limitations.  I did, and was.  Think about it - it's not going to be long before cheap and accurate 3D printers are as ubiquitous as laser and ink jet printers.  2D CAD is to 3D CAD as a text editor is to a WYSIWYG word processor.

I have yet to find a free package that comes anywhere close to rivaling the big boys of 3D cad.  Let the debate commence.... again... ;)

Offline Brass_Machine

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2015, 12:30:32 AM »
I will second Geomagic (used to be Alibre). Been using it for over 6 years now. Cheaper than solidworks (which was what won me over).

But, like anything else, everyone is going to have an opinion. Sort of like cars and hand tools...

They all pretty much do close to the same things. It is finding one that fits you and your price point.

Eric
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Offline Lew_Merrick_PE

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2015, 11:17:20 AM »
Richard,

I have been using CAD tools since 1971.  I currently go back-and-forth among: CREO/ProEngineer, Geomagic Design, NX, SolidEdge, and SolidWorks (depending on what my customer demands).  The question is, What do you want/need to accomplish?

I admit to being a partisan for Geomagic Design.  It is, relative to the other programs I named, inexpensive, simple to use, easy to customize, and more powerful than most people realize.  On the downside (which is true of all CAD products), it has not really caught up with the nature of (mechanical) design development in recent years.  The greatest "issues" with it is that many otherwise wonderfully conceptual tools get tossed in without the deliberation they deserve and then are not brought back up to polish them to fit.  [This may be said of most CAD products as well.]

On the other hand, were price no object whatsoever (yeah, sure, you betcha), SolidEdge would be my personal choice.  [Just to be clear.]

As I said, the question is, What do you want/need to accomplish?

Offline tramp92

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2015, 04:06:57 PM »
I know it is expensive but Solidworks would be my choice. I appreciate the software can seem pedantic to say the least when you start but after a while the reasons for it become clear. It is all about the actual intent of the design, not just modelling it.

I did have quite a play with the free version of PTC Creo. That seemed to work well.

Offline John Stevenson

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2015, 04:54:21 PM »
I read the original poster as needing something simple like Cut2D ?
In which case simple usually goes with cheap so anyone offering Solid Works as advise is on to a hiding.

If the OP wants 2D CAD which contrary to popular opinion and regurgitated again and again, 2D CAD is still alive and kicking and for many things like a quick toolpath is far quicker than doing a model them getting the drawing off the model.

Plenty of free 2D programs out there, Draftsight and the solid edge 2D version is also free.

Good news on the 3D scene is that for small users there are a couple of free programs.

Onshape is a browser based free 3D CAD system from the original writers of Solid Works.

Autodesk Fusion 360 is also free for small users or home shop and has a 3D CAM package built in.

These two have only recently come about so expect some big changes in the 3D CAD/ CAM market over the months to come.
John Stevenson

Offline sparky961

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2015, 07:41:51 PM »
If the OP wants 2D CAD which contrary to popular opinion and regurgitated again and again, 2D CAD is still alive and kicking and for many things like a quick toolpath is far quicker than doing a model them getting the drawing off the model.

You raise some good points here, and perhaps it is quicker - initially.  That's where the "parametric" part comes into play.  I have yet to use a decent 2D CAD program that takes changes into account.  Most are based around the AutoCAD model, which seems to be more focused on one-time entry of a drawing rather than making inevitable changes easier.  Really, how hard is it to let me change the length of a line, or move a line with connected lines remaining connected?  How about all the other lines that are connected to it, plus that radius that needs to change now?  Use some 2D el-cheap-o program to do this and not only do you spend way more time than you need to, but you end up with a bunch of disjoint line segments instead of connected paths.

I think it's pretty funny how Dassault Systems snubbed AutoDesk by essentially putting a free AutoCAD out there for everyone to use.  It was kind of like saying "Oh, this thing?  It has no real value".

Do I use 2D?  Yes.  I use MasterCAM's built-in editor for lathe toolpaths, CorelDraw for more serious editing of curves and more detailed items, and DraftSight for making quick tweaks to existing DXF's.  But for any real designing - even a flat sheet metal part, it's always a 3D parametric model.  I'm not a gambling man, but I'd be rich if I were to bet that design you thought was set in stone is about to change.

And yes, perhaps this doesn't quite answer the OP's question, but when when someone uninformed or naive (in the innocent sense) asks a question, they often don't know enough to ask it completely.  And, as many have already astutely mentioned, CAD software is a tool and what's right for one may not be right for another.

I always think this is a fun discussion to have because it often brings to light the new product offerings, plus what has been rendered obsolete.

Offline mattinker

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2015, 08:01:07 PM »
Good news on the 3D scene is that for small users there are a couple of free programs.

Onshape is a browser based free 3D CAD system from the original writers of Solid Works.

Autodesk Fusion 360 is also free for small users or home shop and has a 3D CAM package built in.

These two have only recently come about so expect some big changes in the 3D CAD/ CAM market over the months to come.

I always follow this kind of thread looking for new software. Thanks John for the two programs you site, they look interesting!

Regards, Matthew

Offline Swarfing

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #10 on: April 04, 2015, 11:41:56 AM »
For a real debate on this we really need Richard to let us know what he needs the CAD for? I personally only use free stuff being a Linux user and CNCer. My choices are Alibre CAD and Draftsight, These are way quicker to use for toolpaths as you get no bloat in the code once picked up by my CAM package. If i really do need 3D then i use FreeCad. This has nothing to do with not paying for it as i could get pro software and pay for it. Problem with this is i get no benefit from doing so and the bells and whistles just would not get used.

I'm in Johns camp on this one, whats the point in taking your Ferrari to the shops 2 mins away when your bike is good enough at no cost? Unless you just want to show off of course and not bother using all that power and extra gears, fuel etc doing the same thing?
Once in hole stop digging.

Offline tom osselton

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #11 on: April 04, 2015, 06:15:39 PM »
I took a day course at protospace offering solidworks basics and they said it will probably change to the fusion 360 as they are made by the same people and uses the same (free) cam program that they use for their tormach mill.

Offline richard westerfield

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #12 on: April 04, 2015, 07:53:12 PM »
what I need the software for Is the end plates on a fly reel I have to make them in the style of an old von hoffe post reel . theses of you who  know fly reels will know what I am talking .I have to make hole from the top 3/8 of an inch from zero degrees on the left and 3/8 on the right of zero degrees then I have drill holes at 45- 80-160 degrees how do I figure out the  degree placement of the hole on the software how do I unplay it to the drawing of a circle  I want to thank everyone who has helped me so far. I think will help me and once i get over this I will be on my way .I think I will be going for turbo cad
I hope I make some sense of what I am talking about
thank you
Richard Westerfield
 

Offline vtsteam

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #13 on: April 04, 2015, 09:02:29 PM »
Richard, do you want to produce G-code from this for a CNC machine, or do you want a drawing out of it?

Each CAD will do things in a somewhat different way, so it's pretty difficult to explain how to do your reel drawing (or code).

In general you draw things onscreen, like circles for holes or the reel face, using iconized tools for that purpose. You usually specify, when doing that, the size of the circle and the placement (your 3/8" from some point for instance). You can move them around and resize them. To find the angular position in degrees, you generally can query the object's properties from some point and line, or use a protractor tool (in SketchUP), or draw auto dimension lines specifying degrees for the text, or use some other method that the CAD supports.

Output in CAD programs is usually files or printed drawings, and in CAM programs is in G-code. Some CAD programs can do G-code as well, either natively, or with a plugin.

That's all a simplification -- apologies if you already know all that.  :beer:

ps if you only want to find the angular locations for some holes on your project, and don't need g-code, and don't yet know CAD, you can probably get it pretty quickly and easily if you just draw it out full scale by hand, and measure the angles with a protractor. Sorry again if I'm talking down to you on the subject!
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
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Offline richard westerfield

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #14 on: April 04, 2015, 10:09:51 PM »
more then likely I  will draw them than  import them to  cut 2 than to a cam software as you can tell I am not to good with cad getting around in it . but I am all right with cut 2 what I am going to do is draw it out put it on to a file them transfer  it to cut 2 make tool paths then on to a cam software that should do it hope it works out
thank you
Richard

Offline vtsteam

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #15 on: April 04, 2015, 10:21:32 PM »
Since you're used to Cut2 already, that sounds like it will work out for this project. Drawing by hand and measuring lines for dimensions still works. Most ships and aircraft until relatively recently were done that way. Plans produced to scale, and then lofted to get part shapes and sizes.
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
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Offline richard westerfield

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Re: cad softweare
« Reply #16 on: April 04, 2015, 11:23:09 PM »
thank you so much ill let use know how I am making out after I fix my mill and finish building my cnc milling machine some time this summer

Richard