Author Topic: Audels Machinists and Toolmaker's Handy Book  (Read 3660 times)

Offline Yankee Tom

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Audels Machinists and Toolmaker's Handy Book
« on: November 11, 2014, 04:30:44 AM »
My copy of this textbook for students of the machine trades is from 1942. It covers the machines then in use, along with some layout, shop math, and(wait for it) the slide rule.

Lots of machine diagrams and photos. The photos are not the best I've ever seen, but they're usable.



Tom

Offline awemawson

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Re: Audels Machinists and Toolmaker's Handy Book
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2014, 05:26:35 AM »
Nowt wrong with slide rules. I still have my Aristo Scholar that took me through my applied physics course  :thumbup:
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

lordedmond

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Re: Audels Machinists and Toolmaker's Handy Book
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2014, 07:25:01 AM »
Yep same here Andrew still got mine that took me though the electrical engineering study
No such thing as a calculator it was logs or slide rule or heaven forbid long hand

Stuart

Offline Lew_Merrick_PE

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Re: Audels Machinists and Toolmaker's Handy Book
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2014, 10:39:51 AM »
It is currently in storage, but my 1966, NASA issue, 26 inch/3 decimal place bamboo & ivory K&E slide rule lives in a glass-fronted box with a brass hammer and an In case of emergency, break glass placard in a shadow box!

Offline awemawson

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Re: Audels Machinists and Toolmaker's Handy Book
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2014, 10:50:42 AM »
I have an Abacus hanging up on the office wall as the ultimate back up - does that count  :lol:







only if you know how to use it  :ddb:
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline gmac

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Re: Audels Machinists and Toolmaker's Handy Book
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2014, 12:23:46 PM »
My German made Faber-Castell slide rule sits right here on my desk - a reminder of how shocked I was at what it cost in 1971 when I started taking aeronautical engineering. I had to forgo a lot of Kraft Dinners and cans of beans to get it. I've given it away twice because I never use it, but it's always come back, so I guess it was meant to be mine.

How does Audels compare with Machinery's Handbook, which I've always used? Worth picking up?

Cheers Garry

Offline SwarfnStuff

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Re: Audels Machinists and Toolmaker's Handy Book
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2014, 01:41:21 AM »
Does this post say something about our age?? I still have my Faber-Castell slide rule in the house someplace. I must admit that I can now only recall how to multiply and divide, through lack of use no doubt.   :doh: Can't find my log book - I think it it is hiding with my laminated copy of the periodic table. But me compass and set squares are in the shed. Calculator and CAD seem to rule now. Certainly WAY easier to re-draw something  with CAD than pencil and paper.
Converting good metal into swarf sometimes ending up with something useful. ;-)

Offline Yankee Tom

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Re: Audels Machinists and Toolmaker's Handy Book
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2014, 03:24:04 AM »
I use Machinery's Handbook for its tables, formulas, and section on properties of materials.

The purpose of the Machinists and Tool Makers Handy Book is: "To provide a complete course of study for those desiring to become machinists, and to help machinists become tool makers".

For the paper work, go to Machinery"s Handbook. If you need to do single point threading, or make use of a plunger back dial indicator, the Audels book is the one.

My Aristo Multilog can still do the job, after all these years.

Tom

Offline Lew_Merrick_PE

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Re: Audels Machinists and Toolmaker's Handy Book
« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2014, 11:39:54 AM »
I did not run into Audel's until a decade or so into my career.  I still have copies of the WWII era How to Run an Engine Lathe, How to Run a Milling Machine, and the like that were the books used during my apprenticeship.  They were published (1942-44, as I recall) by the U.S. Department of Labor.