Author Topic: New life to a old hockey puck  (Read 3926 times)

Offline PekkaNF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1813
  • Country: fi
New life to a old hockey puck
« on: September 19, 2015, 06:05:08 PM »
I'm working on this one.

Let's see how it comes out.

Pekka

Offline SwarfnStuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 503
  • Country: au
Re: New life to a old hockey puck
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2015, 02:44:36 AM »
Well, so far so good Pekka, but just what is it you are working on? Or must we wait and see? Looks like it may be a castor ("caster", depending on which side of the globe you dwell) or something to me.
John B
Converting good metal into swarf sometimes ending up with something useful. ;-)

Offline PekkaNF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1813
  • Country: fi
Re: New life to a old hockey puck
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2015, 04:25:49 AM »
Nothing special. Just a puck lying on floor, a big washer as bearing plate (there is going be slight camfer on ID hole) and a carriage bolt to provide concave surface to allow a little tilt.

The screw is differential screw, but I don't know if it works good enough. M12x1,75 vs. M16x2,0 was the combination that came with tyhe tools I have and standard bolts. I would have prefered much M12*1,5 but that is not a standard. M10 but it looks thin and Could not have used standard long nut.

This screw gives a very sensitive adjustment range, downside is that there is very little of height adjustment overall. I need to get the machine fairly close to level to start with. This Grinding machine has three mounts. I'm planning to put single non differential screw on rear, get it fairly close, and use these more sensitive ones on front feets.

Started cleaning the lathe and chuck to change ouside jaws for hockey pucks and the chuck seized...not solid but I was not confortable to use use any force. Vacuum cleaner and a fiddle did not help, I took it out, dismantled and cleaned inside. There was very little debris inside...bit it was a piece of swarf between chuck body ways and jaw tooth. It's all it takes.

Pekka

Offline PekkaNF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1813
  • Country: fi
Re: New life to a old hockey puck
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2015, 08:45:41 AM »
OK, two more pics, they should be pretty selfexplanaory..I spent more time on migrating from W7 to Windows #10.

Ruber was pretty hard and nice to turn,  but messy. Not quite like cast iron, but clearly messier than I'm used to. Whole lot nicer to tun that softer rubber.

I didn't find a proper M16 long stop screw I need to buy one and a lock nut on it. Those ase missing on the picture. Slight change of plan.

Pekka

Offline vtsteam

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4862
  • Country: us
  • Republic of Vermont
    • www. sredmond.com
Re: New life to a old hockey puck
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2015, 02:16:02 PM »
I put rubber in the freezer when I have to machine it. Particularly good when doing things like trying to drill a hole in a rubber stopper. But hockey pucks are nice hard rubber to begin with.
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
www.sredmond.com

Offline NeoTech

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 828
  • Country: se
    • Roughedge Hobbyworks
Re: New life to a old hockey puck
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2015, 05:47:32 PM »
I have hockey pucks u nder all my machines just not thought of making a small stand for em like that.. wonder if they can handle the shaper machine as well..  *googling where to find used hockey pucks*
Machinery: Optimum D320x920, Optimum BF20L, Aciera F3. -- I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. http://www.roughedge.se/blogg/

Offline SwarfnStuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 503
  • Country: au
Re: New life to a old hockey puck
« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2015, 02:51:52 AM »
Thanks for the explanation Pekka. Now I am more educated than previously, well, regarding hockey pucks as machine leveling feet anyway.
John B
Converting good metal into swarf sometimes ending up with something useful. ;-)

Offline PekkaNF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1813
  • Country: fi
Re: New life to a old hockey puck
« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2015, 03:22:53 AM »
No problem Swafn'!

I have two dubious experiments here...contary my habits, but least I can test two permutations on one go!

1) I'm trusting carriage bolt dome and washer to conteract floor tilt. Downside is that if the grinder jumps, it might land on atypical attitude on floor....I might need to build a retainer. I would bolt shaper on floor or use a big board under and make holes to pucks with a hole saw or something.

2) Differential nut here trades stroke to ease of adjustment. It should allow 16 mm of nut movement (8 rounds), that translates to 2 mm of carriage bolt movement...I felt that 2 mm of lift per revolution is fairly difficult for leveling (least if you have more accurate that carpenter's level). I might have gone other extreme with 0,25 mm/r resolution, but that was possible with standard taps/dies I had.

Threads are far from perfect, but this does not depend accuracy on dial reading, therefore I felt that thread accuracy (lead accuracy and clearance) is no issue here. This is not a way to make a lead screw or micrometer.

Pekka


Offline PekkaNF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1813
  • Country: fi
Re: New life to a old hockey puck
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2015, 02:55:14 PM »
And one ugly rough adjustment one. I Should have made it more simple, but I could not help myself.

Pekka

Offline NeoTech

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 828
  • Country: se
    • Roughedge Hobbyworks
Re: New life to a old hockey puck
« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2015, 03:25:01 PM »
As a retiner, why not just a small dab of silicone?
Machinery: Optimum D320x920, Optimum BF20L, Aciera F3. -- I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. http://www.roughedge.se/blogg/

Offline PekkaNF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1813
  • Country: fi
Re: New life to a old hockey puck
« Reply #10 on: September 22, 2015, 02:33:45 AM »
I hope I will not need silicon. I only know two uses of it :lol:

Normal machine feet sets in floor that tight that after few years you need to prise them away, I had a top coat of the floor to come off with them...

I meant more like restrain, I'm not sure if the grinding machine jumps or shakes if something goes wrong. I never used grinder of this size, I'll start it first time without anything on arbour. I'll be wearing brown pants when I'll mount the disc there first time. If it shakes or jumps, I'm not worried about it getting out of level, I'm afraid one feet landing off the puck and table rolling off the grinder or something. And ofcourse bursting disc is very high on my list of "Not wishing to happen in this life".

Pekka

Offline NeoTech

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 828
  • Country: se
    • Roughedge Hobbyworks
Re: New life to a old hockey puck
« Reply #11 on: September 22, 2015, 03:17:47 AM »
if one look at commercial grade feet.. most of the heavy load ones has a steel cup around the rubber part. Maybean idea make a loose fit container for the puck so it doesnt collpase.
Machinery: Optimum D320x920, Optimum BF20L, Aciera F3. -- I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. http://www.roughedge.se/blogg/

Offline PekkaNF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1813
  • Country: fi
Re: New life to a old hockey puck
« Reply #12 on: September 22, 2015, 04:07:28 AM »
Jep I have those on milling machine. There are two cups one vulcanized? to the rubber and outer one. O-ring on circumference. More than 3 mm thick. O' joy of pressing one, welding or turning....Hmmm. 80 mm stock and turning would give all kind of possibilities, like turning some "cooling fins" on outside!

I'm going to test them soon, hopefully I'll get of my work early to spare an hour or more on the machine. Let's see what initial test will reveal.

Pekka

Offline NeoTech

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 828
  • Country: se
    • Roughedge Hobbyworks
Re: New life to a old hockey puck
« Reply #13 on: September 22, 2015, 07:02:49 AM »
I would prob. just take a piece of pipe that fits and turn the inside so they slip over.
Machinery: Optimum D320x920, Optimum BF20L, Aciera F3. -- I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. http://www.roughedge.se/blogg/