Author Topic: Working with AMP connectors  (Read 2846 times)

Offline sparky961

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Working with AMP connectors
« on: March 15, 2016, 10:07:36 PM »
Does anyone know of a way to work with the pins in various connector shells without purchasing a $300 crimper (and probably more for each die head)?

Ok, so I have seen them for something like $150 (CAD) as well but that's also too much.

I have a few connectors that were cut off with about 2" of wire, which I can connect to, but I'd rather do it a bit cleaner than that by using fresh wires the correct length.

Offline PekkaNF

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Re: Working with AMP connectors
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2016, 12:15:00 AM »
What is AMP connctor?

Does it has 6.3x0.8mm spade connectors? Like these:
http://www.tme.eu/gb/details/671.00.9/non-insulated-terminals/imp/
http://www.tme.eu/gb/details/674.08.00.9/non-insulated-terminals/imp/

And stuff like this:
http://www.tme.eu/gb/details/200.060w/non-insulated-terminals/imp/

I found this one works pretty good for these non insulated "Abico" spade terminals:
http://www.tme.eu/gb/details/ht-236c/crimping-tools-for-terminals/

Thre seems to be pretty many different type crimping pliers, most of the taiwan made seems to work for hobby use.

If you google HT-236C, you might find a local supplier. Many different "brands". Make sure you get the right crimpper for the terminals, there are surpricing amount of almost identical looking pliers and they are just a little different.

Hope this helps.

Pekka

Offline kayzed1

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Offline sparky961

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Re: Working with AMP connectors
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2016, 04:46:25 PM »
Sorry, I put up the original message on my way out.  Upon re-reading it I wasn't very clear in my request for info.

AMP is the manufacturer, but they make bazillions (yes, that's a scientific term) of different connector types.  I've attached pictures showing the two (M and F for each) that I'm currently working with.  Also some technical drawings.  Now that I'm looking at them again, the first isn't even "AMP", it's "Molex".  The second is AMP/Tyco

For the AMP/Tyco, part number molded on the shell is 206060-1.  The data sheet has information about a bunch of others in the series as well.

http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/1276248.pdf

I was hoping to have a more generic solution that will work with others too but maybe I'm asking for too much there.  Maybe I can just butcher them with pliers ;) ?

Offline awemawson

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Re: Working with AMP connectors
« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2016, 04:57:51 PM »
For the circular Amp type I've always bought 'solder spill' contacts hence avoided the need to crimp. Slip a sleeve on the wire first, solder it then slip the sleeve over the exposed bit of contact.

For the Molex ones I bought the crimp tool from RS if I remember correctly
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline sparky961

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Re: Working with AMP connectors
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2016, 10:49:50 AM »
Thanks, Andrew.  I didn't realize there were solder-type contacts for the round AMP connectors.  The terminals are usually the inexpensive part, it's the crimper that's generally pretty insane to buy.  I'll try that route for those.

I also looked into the price for crimpers for Molex and they weren't near as bad - though still a bit costly for occasional hobby use.  I was able to find some multi-purpose ones that looked decent so that might be the way I go there.

Offline awemawson

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Re: Working with AMP connectors
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2016, 11:54:18 AM »
These are the ones I used on my servo driven 4th axis:

Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline sparky961

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Re: Working with AMP connectors
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2016, 01:01:06 PM »
Oh, so the pins don't actually come out of the shell?  I have some SUB-D connectors like that.  Not bad to work with, but I was hoping to re-use the shells I have.  It isn't critical I do so, just trying to save a few bucks.

Offline awemawson

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Re: Working with AMP connectors
« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2016, 01:43:50 PM »
They may do perhaps with one of those tubular extractors - mine came fully populated - they are well made Chinese copies off ebay sold as 'circular military connectors'. Initially the seller cocked up the male / femaleness of the free cable plug / chassis socket, so I ended up with a few of the opposite 'orientation'

Here is an example:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Military-4-Pin-Cylindrical-Voltage-Circular-Connector-/191653795399?hash=item2c9f74d647:g:JkMAAOSwyQtVwfUN
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline DMIOM

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(O/T) Re: Working with AMP connectors
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2016, 05:31:42 AM »
They may do perhaps with one of those tubular extractors - mine came fully populated - they are well made Chinese copies off ebay sold as 'circular military connectors'. Initially the seller cocked up the male / femaleness of the free cable plug / chassis socket, so I ended up with a few of the opposite 'orientation'

Here is an example:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Military-4-Pin-Cylindrical-Voltage-Circular-Connector-/191653795399?hash=item2c9f74d647:g:JkMAAOSwyQtVwfUN
(O/T)

Andrew - if the vendor's spec is right, and the part was 'on limit', is there a risk they might get a bit warm?

  Working Voltage AC 500V
  Current 25A
  Contact Resistance <1Ω
  Insulation Resistance >500Ω

Dave   :coffee:

Offline awemawson

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Re: Working with AMP connectors
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2016, 05:38:55 AM »
500 ohms insulation resistance - probably lost a k somewhere  :lol:

That wasn't necessarily the vendor I used - just an example off ebay, and they work just fine  :ddb:
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex