Author Topic: Test drive of Bondic light setting adhesive metal plastic and wood  (Read 2669 times)

Offline PTsideshow

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I ordered the Bondic brand adhesive from Amazon, they have a couple of good deals and with the prime membership shipping is free.
I ordered the one set that came with two extra tubes of the adhesive. For a lot less than the TV version.

I wanted to use it on my case trimmers I have dedicated ones for the desert Eagle .50A.E. and the .50 Beowulf, I put something to act like handles on each and then I can keep both the shell holder and base together with the large trimmer and proper cal bar. In the re-purposed drill/tap containers,since they don't see much use with the straight wall casings.

After drilling the correct sized hole for the shaft, I then counter sunk the hole edge to give the adhesive a larger area to grip. I washed the machining oil residue of it before mounting it in the die, have a bunch left over from the magic trick manufacturing days. After seating I apply the adhesive in the counter sunk area. Now the only thing that didn't work right was the length of time they said to expose the adhesive to the light. I double the amount of time not less than 5 sec as I moved it around the adhesive line. Just remember that this adhesive only will work were the light cures it.

It worked equally well on the steel to cheap plastic the dice are made from, and the wood small file handles to the steel of the shell holder mount. My file handles required that the hole be enlarged.  I tried to twist them apart with more force than they will receive in use.

This adhesive works as advertised.
"The internet just a figment, of my imagination!' 
 
 There are only 3 things I can't do!"
Raise the Dead!
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and I'm working on the first two!
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Offline nrml

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Re: Test drive of Bondic light setting adhesive metal plastic and wood
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2016, 08:09:52 AM »
Do you think it would work well for coating over micro PCB limit switches to protect them from swarf? It would save the hassle of making a mould and potting them.

Offline PTsideshow

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Re: Test drive of Bondic light setting adhesive metal plastic and wood
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2016, 05:56:02 AM »
As long as all of the adhesive can be reached with the light , They suggest one builds up layers setting each first. They also state that it could be used for low voltage electronics. used as insulation but first make sure you have a good electrical connection. the max's voltage are listed as  50 AC and 120 volts DC. You can go to their web site  http://notaglue.com/  the above info is for this brand only. :thumbup:
"The internet just a figment, of my imagination!' 
 
 There are only 3 things I can't do!"
Raise the Dead!
        Walk on water!
                 Fix a broken heart!
and I'm working on the first two!
glen

Offline snub

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Re: Test drive of Bondic light setting adhesive metal plastic and wood
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2016, 08:50:44 PM »
I'm glad you had good luck with the Bondic, unfortunately I had no luck at all. I followed the instructions to the letter, went overboard on the preparation, but could not get it to work. It's a shame because I've been  trying to find a product whereby you could clamp the pieces together, and then apply the adhesive. Maybe I got a bad batch.

I will try again, tho.

Offline Fergus OMore

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Re: Test drive of Bondic light setting adhesive metal plastic and wood
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2016, 03:34:25 PM »
As far as I can gather, Bondic is one of those glues/adhesives from dentistry.

I broke a crown- eating Chinese spare ribs. The glue wouldn't work on dentine for any length of time but the new crown was set using something similar using a hand held UV torch. Touch wood?

Earlier, my late wife was No2 Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons and a consultant orthodontist. I offered our daughter who holds a Master's Degree if she wanted her mother's kit. Apparently fixed appliances are now glued in. Certainly, my 11 year old grandson, her son has glued in fasteners. I was and am interested and wondered how after the end of treatment this glue was to be removed. Simple enough with a burr and handpiece, I was informed.

So I'm pretty sure that I should be looking for Bondic for workshop use.

I hope that this helps a bit

Norman

Offline awemawson

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Re: Test drive of Bondic light setting adhesive metal plastic and wood
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2016, 04:13:19 PM »
I had a temporary filling the other week, prior to a new crown being fitted. The temporary filling was set with UV light - all very good, but it didn't last past my Cornflakes at breakfast the following day  :bugeye:

I told the dentist that he hadn't undercut the hole enough, which just elicited a grunt from him  :lol:
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline Manxmodder

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Re: Test drive of Bondic light setting adhesive metal plastic and wood
« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2016, 03:03:52 PM »
Norman, I think the UV cure cyano adhesive has it's origins as much in the glass trade as dentistry,if not more so.

We used such a specialist adhesive back in the early 80's to bond components of glass sculptures when I were a glass maker apprentice.

A friend of mine was using various UV cure glass adhesives earlier this year to make frameless glass display cases for a local museum....OZ.
Helixes aren't always downward spirals,sometimes they're screwed up

Offline Fergus OMore

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Re: Test drive of Bondic light setting adhesive metal plastic and wood
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2016, 04:41:39 PM »
Norman, I think the UV cure cyano adhesive has it's origins as much in the glass trade as dentistry,if not more so.

..OZ.

I'm indebted to you.  I am clearly out of date! So much so that I past my last place of employment today- and realised that I had been retired for the last 32 years.  The last time that I was paid pennies for plastics was perhaps 1953.

Where did the time go? :scratch:

Thanks

Norman