Author Topic: Sine Plate plans  (Read 2875 times)

Offline Brass_Machine

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Sine Plate plans
« on: April 07, 2016, 09:51:55 PM »
Hopefully soon I am going to be refurbishing, upgrading and generally fixing my tools. One of things I need to make first to assist with that is a sine plate. Something along the lines of this:



I know I have seen some plans out there for one, but now I am having trouble finding it. Anyone got a link for plans that they can send me to?

FYI... I am not looking to make something super accurate.

Thanks
Eric
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Offline Brass_Machine

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Re: Sine Plate plans
« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2016, 10:15:46 PM »
And with some further digging... I found one of my old posts on the topic!!!

HERE

Cool. Think I am good, so please ignore!
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Offline Lew_Merrick_PE

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Re: Sine Plate plans
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2016, 11:34:41 PM »
What size or type of sine plate are you looking for?  I have several designs ranging from ones I did for the (American) National Bureau of Standards to quick & dirty adjustable angle plates for milling machines.

Offline Joules

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Re: Sine Plate plans
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2016, 01:40:26 AM »
Quick and dirty sounds ideal to me....
Just get doing and make swarf, you can decide what its going to be later.   :thumbup:

Offline Lew_Merrick_PE

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Re: Sine Plate plans
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2016, 10:34:28 AM »
Quick and dirty sounds ideal to me....

But what size?  5 inch centers, 10 inch center, something else?  12 inch X 8 inch, 6 inch X 20 inch, 6 inch X 4 inch, ???  It does make a difference.

Offline Brass_Machine

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Re: Sine Plate plans
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2016, 10:45:24 AM »
Well, I have to fit it on my mill table and it is a mini mill.

Quick and dirty. 4x2
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Offline Joules

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Re: Sine Plate plans
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2016, 11:07:56 AM »
4x2 would also fit my little Taig mill.   :beer:
Just get doing and make swarf, you can decide what its going to be later.   :thumbup:

Offline Chuck in E. TN

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Re: Sine Plate plans
« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2016, 02:37:53 PM »
Brass_Machine ,

Quick and dirty, eh? How about a piece of aluminum plate bolted to a piece of 2" round aluminum bar? Can be held in the vice on your mill, and set at any angle with a protractor. The table was set into the bar so I could rotate it 90 deg. I was still working on it when I took the pics, so surface is a bit rough. I was experimenting with flycutters. I have since smoothed the table and drilled a pattern of holes for clamp screws. I don't use it every day, but it works when I need it.
Chuck in E. TN
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Offline Brass_Machine

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Re: Sine Plate plans
« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2016, 02:46:24 PM »
Now that is a good quick and dirty way of doing it. That will work for me.

So, looking at it, does it have to be round bar? I would think that square stock could work?
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Offline Chuck in E. TN

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Re: Sine Plate plans
« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2016, 03:59:18 PM »
Well, if you only wanted 0 deg and 90 deg... You have the mill table and a standard angle plate to accomplish those positions. What about 30, 45, or 60? Or anywhere in between?
The round bar has a step milled in it equal to the thickness of the plate and aligned with the center axis. You set the round bar in your vice and the plate rotates like a hinge. Tighten the vise at the angle you want... Capish?

Chuck
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Offline Chuck in E. TN

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Re: Sine Plate plans
« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2016, 07:03:30 PM »
B-M,
Maybe the pictures I posted are confusing. The one of the tool in the vise was the setup I was using to flycut the plate. I posted that picture to show the inset of the plate into the round stock. It could be used in that orientation, but the true 'angle plate' use would be with the round stock held 90 deg to that shown. HTH!

Chuck
Chuck in E. TN
Famous TN last words: "Hey ya'll, watch this..."
MicroMark 7x14, HF X2 mill, Green 4x6 saw. Harbor Freight 170A mig

Offline Brass_Machine

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Re: Sine Plate plans
« Reply #11 on: April 08, 2016, 09:03:42 PM »
That's what it is. I understand now. Thanks for clarifying.
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Offline Toolshed

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Re: Sine Plate plans
« Reply #12 on: May 09, 2016, 11:04:43 AM »
What amount of downward force do you think these can hold up to?  I'm thinking of making something similar for my drill press.  The plate might be 4-5" square, but needs to be really THIN since I don't want to take up too much of the miniscule 8" of throw I have. 

By way of the 'downward force', I was contemplating some sort of "knuckle"  joint, but not sure I could get enough positive pressure on the ball joint to hold up to much drilling force....

I guess I might just have to try it and see what happens.  :-)
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Offline PekkaNF

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Re: Sine Plate plans
« Reply #13 on: May 09, 2016, 12:42:45 PM »
You are bound to have "It depends..." type answer. From my bad memory 10-12 mm dia drill needs something like 200 kg force to feed it into structural steel, without pilot hole.

Your variables are material, drill, pilot hole and most importantly feed and how heavy handed you are.

My personal experience is that drilling needs a good support from below. Maybe you can use something light to make a setup and good clamps and jack screws to hold piece up.

Pekka

Offline Toolshed

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Re: Sine Plate plans
« Reply #14 on: May 09, 2016, 01:43:07 PM »
Thank you!  That's what I figured I would hear.  I don't know all the little calculations that go into "Force x on this size bit equals a number"  200lbs would sound about right tho....Most of my drilling is 1/2 inch and less

ONE Reason I'm not an engineer....I didn't need a single math class to be able to tell people to reboot.  ;-)
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Offline PekkaNF

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Re: Sine Plate plans
« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2016, 02:42:01 PM »
Haa...I am an electrical engineer and I used to program industrial PLCs, but some reason I am involved mostly on mechatronics. I know very little a lot of stuff and whole lot many stuff that has absolutely no hobby use! Most of the social fuctions I don't tell that I am an engineer, because everybody thinks that I am a sadist that designs remote controllers and smart phones.....

Anyway, often online calculators will let you try out several values:
http://www.custompartnet.com/calculator/drilling-speed-and-feed
http://www.kennametal.com/en/resources/engineering-calculators/holemaking-calculators/torque-thrust-power.html

Pekka