Author Topic: aged brass?  (Read 1482 times)

Offline angus

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aged brass?
« on: October 19, 2016, 11:27:51 AM »
how do i age shiny brass to make it look old ? (without waiting a long time) :)

Offline DMIOM

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Re: aged brass?
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2016, 11:43:35 AM »
Both ammonia and vinegar will have an effect, also many commercial formulations available - just Google for Patina Solution for Brass. However you do it, to get complete coverage its critical that you thoroughly degrease the workpiece first.

Online awemawson

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Re: aged brass?
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2016, 12:35:50 PM »
The 'antique shop' rascals make new ones look old by lightly covering them in soil (about 3 inches) then regularly peeing on that patch for a few weeks. This may or may not appeal as a solution  :clap:
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline appletree

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Re: aged brass?
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2016, 01:20:52 PM »
The 'antique shop' rascals make new ones look old by lightly covering them in soil (about 3 inches) then regularly peeing on that patch for a few weeks. This may or may not appeal as a solution  :clap:

I would have thought it would be a paste rather than a solution!!

Offline efrench

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Re: aged brass?
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2016, 03:40:03 PM »
Train a cat to pee on it.  Cat pee is stronger than human pee.  The hard part is training a cat :scratch:

Offline jb3cx

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Re: aged brass?
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2016, 04:08:26 PM »
Got to agree with dmiom,ammonia is the best ,I use it all the time ,to age small brass fittings for lamps ect ,put the amonia in a receptical ( a clear one is best as you can see the colour you require without taking the cloth off ) and suspend the part above the ammonia and cover with a cloth for the best results ,the longer you leave it the darker it gets ,leave it to long and it will go black .
Hope this helps
Peter

Online awemawson

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Re: aged brass?
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2016, 03:04:24 AM »
Ammonia ..... same chemical ..... different source  .....   :lol:
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline angus

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Re: aged brass?
« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2016, 11:16:23 AM »
thanks all.... can get ammonia at work :)

Offline Manxmodder

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Re: aged brass?
« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2016, 05:43:44 AM »
Got to agree with dmiom,ammonia is the best ,I use it all the time ,to age small brass fittings for lamps ect ,put the amonia in a receptical ( a clear one is best as you can see the colour you require without taking the cloth off ) and suspend the part above the ammonia and cover with a cloth for the best results ,the longer you leave it the darker it gets ,leave it to long and it will go black .
Hope this helps
Peter

I have a number of really old engineering books and in one there is a diagram and text describing very much the same technique as you're using. The diagram shows brass parts suspended from a wooden support arm by string with a petri dish containing ammonia placed beneath and the parts and dish are then covered with a bell jar while the ammonia vapour does its thing.

When we talk of ageing brass I think that a certain amount of de-zincification is what is needed to achieve the authentic patina of age.

I say this because a chap I met some years ago made replica brass gasolier lamp fittings and he was always on the hunt for old brass tubing. He pointed out that the very old stuff bore a fine surface pitting that had been caused by the zinc being corroded out by many years of atmospheric exposure.

He did also use chemical ageing techniques to give new brass stock this same pitted patina......OZ.
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