Author Topic: new workshop - insulation advice needed  (Read 2310 times)

Offline Bee

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Re: new workshop - insulation advice needed
« Reply #25 on: May 05, 2017, 07:03:44 PM »
If it is attached to the house building regs will most likely require an inner lining of plasterboard over the OSB for fire retarding.
The outside wall needs a vapour barrier on the inside of the insulation behind the plasterboard. If you want a gap between the insulation and the wall blocks it will probably be pointless unless it is vented to the outside otherwise moisture will just move between the wall and the vapour barrier between night and day as the temperature profile shifts. For a spacer use 'corex' the plastic equivalent of corrugated cardboard cut into squares or strips and tacked to the wall. The holes though it allow air circulation
The wall against the house may not need insulation unless it is a cavity wall which will act like a heat chimney up to the roofline. If it is not a cavity wall it should not have a vapour barrier because moisture will be trying to escape from the house more than from the workshop.
EPS is up to 20% better than good fibreglass insulation. An 11 in cavity wall is equivalent to 1in of EPS.

Offline Pete W.

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Re: new workshop - insulation advice needed
« Reply #26 on: May 06, 2017, 05:01:40 AM »
Hi there, Bee,

Is 'corex' the stuff that estate agents (UK terminology) use for their 'For Sale' or 'Sold' signs? 
Best regards,

Pete W.

If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs, you haven't seen the latest change-note!

Offline Bee

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Re: new workshop - insulation advice needed
« Reply #27 on: May 19, 2017, 03:17:08 PM »
Yes, and coming soon to a street near you some political signs. Another possible source if you can find it is they sometimes use it for wrapping large cable drums eg for phone or tv cable though you have to flatten it out again on a hot day.

Offline picclock

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Re: new workshop - insulation advice needed
« Reply #28 on: July 10, 2017, 07:24:32 AM »
We have now moved in but I'm nowhere doing the walls/ceiling because I am stuck on the floor :scratch: !!

On closer inspection of the floor, which is 3 poured slabs done at separate times is not level ( I should say is of many multiple levels) and of poor finish. I would like to get professional help to re-screed and re-level the floor with something like setcrete. I don't think its diy because its over 16 Metres long and to get such a large area (48.6 square metres) level with one pour is quite frankly tricky. I suspect a laser level would have to be used and several people mixing and tamping to get it decent.

Does anyone know the trade name that this would come under ?. Floor fitters are mainly carpenters, plasterers don't do floors etc. Its not easy finding someone without having a job name  :drool:

Best Regards

picclock
 
Engaged in the art of turning large pieces of useful material into ever smaller pieces of (s)crap. (Ferndown, Dorset)

Offline mattinker

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Re: new workshop - insulation advice needed
« Reply #29 on: July 10, 2017, 07:40:04 AM »
How about a builder?

Offline awemawson

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Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline picclock

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Re: new workshop - insulation advice needed
« Reply #31 on: July 12, 2017, 06:01:48 AM »
Thanks for the feedback and further assistance.
I finally got someone whose been doing it for 13 Years. I tend to use checkertrade or mybuilder.com as they have customer feedback, and can supply local artisans. Problem was despite contacting three lots on checkertade with two no replies and one request to visit and assess who didn't turn up, and then trying on mybuilder with no results I was getting a bit desperate, but mybuilder came through. The chap does car showrooms and similar and has some good pictures on Facebook. After a visit he reckons it will take about 30 bags of latex self levelling compound. He is round Friday to seal it and fill in the deep areas, then him and a mate will do it Saturday morning.

Will try and post before and after pictures. Its a very deceptive floor in that its only when you put a straightedge and level on it you can see how bad it is. There are very few places where my ladder will sit with all four feet touching.

Best Regards

picclock
Best Regards

picclock
Engaged in the art of turning large pieces of useful material into ever smaller pieces of (s)crap. (Ferndown, Dorset)

Offline picclock

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Re: new workshop - insulation advice needed
« Reply #32 on: August 03, 2017, 06:28:48 AM »
The floor is latexed  :thumbup:, but the finish is not as good as it should be. The chap doing had cut his knee with a hooked stanley blade and it was stitched up by hospital, which along with the painkillers may have contributed to the issues. However, its adequate and miles better than the crumbly concrete that was there before.

I have just started putting up the battens and insulation which is going well on the whole. Although I have fitted one OSB sheet its too heavy for me to handle on my own so I am getting some help in for that. For the ceiling I have decided to go with a suspended one with insulation on top. Have done quite a few tests on LED bulbs and the two winners are Integral 12.5W for 1521 Lumens and the philips corepro 13.5W @1521 Lumens. They are both about 5 or less depending on quantity, but the Integral lamp has, to my eyes a higher CRI, and uses 8% less power. The supposedly high output junk on ebay is a shadow of the winners. Used a light meter to measure.

I do have a problem with fitting the cut down sheets of polystyrene. The full size sheets work OK but when it comes to the ends of the wall next to the piers they are never square or straight, often waisted in the centre. Its no problem cutting to the shape, but transferring the required size to the sheets is proving very difficult. I am getting by by hand cutting in the last few mm with a stanly knife, but I am sure there must be a better way. Any thoughts or ideas in this area much appreciated.

Best Regards

picclock
Engaged in the art of turning large pieces of useful material into ever smaller pieces of (s)crap. (Ferndown, Dorset)