Author Topic: Rust Removal  (Read 35152 times)

Offline Darren

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Rust Removal
« on: August 23, 2009, 05:30:28 PM »
I decided I wanted to try something different this evening.....so I thought I'd have a go at electrolytic rust removal..... :ddb:

Having read up on a couple of sites it looked simple enough so I had a dig around to see what I had to do the job....

The kitchen cupboard revealed these two ingredients.....a good start



The subject was to be the base plate from my pillar drill which I've had for many years...rather neglected you might say...



I rigged up a half barrel for the container with some sacrificial steel bars for the anodes....(the negative poles)
Along with my car battery charger...which turned out to be useless for this application as it stated the battery had too low a charge so wouldn't switch on. It does this for low batteries as well which is really helpful.... Automation...who needs it.....
:doh:



So I dug out a "proper" power supply from my collection....proper as it will give full control over voltage and current unlike a battery charger.
Apparently control over current is more important than voltage and we don't want too much of either.



The subject to be de-rusted is connected to the negative making it the cathode.

This is approx one hr later, the water was has gone from perfectly clear to mud in a very short space of time....



Some figures,

I decided to use caustic Soda as it's stronger and should help to loosen any paint. About 100g in this tub
(edit, that's a mistake....I used Soda Crystals not Caustic Soda)

Voltage is around 4.5V and current is 500ma

(the soda is to help the water become a better conductor)


Now to leave it overnight and have a look again tomorrow to see how it's getting on...... :)

« Last Edit: August 24, 2009, 08:51:21 AM by Darren »
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Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2009, 07:45:06 AM »
And this is what I was greeted with when I opened the garage door today.....looks promising..... :ddb:



That crud it about 2" thick





Time to dig it out and see where we are



A quick brush over (no hard work here btw) and it's nice to see what's left of the paint almost fall off



It's hard to tell from the pic, but this is down to the bare cast iron with very little rust left. Mostly what was hiding under the paint that was still attached.



So it's gone back in the tub for another blast.....I could do with a full size barrel instead of one cut in half to do the whole lot in one go...



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Offline Stilldrillin

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2009, 08:02:37 AM »
Very nicely done Darren!   :clap:

The gloop looks very similar to school dinner tomato soup.......  :lol: :lol:

David D
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Offline Stefan Pynappels

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2009, 08:05:27 AM »
Well done, are you going to paint it again or protect it some other way?

Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2009, 08:08:25 AM »
Well done, are you going to paint it again or protect it some other way?

No, I'm going to leave it outside to see how quick I can get it to rust up again...... :lol:


Yes, a re-paint in on the cards...prob be another thread  :thumbup:
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Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2009, 08:12:08 AM »


The gloop looks very similar to school dinner tomato soup.......  :lol: :lol:


Send me your addy David....we wouldn't want it to go to waste now would we....... :ddb:
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Offline Stilldrillin

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2009, 08:31:24 AM »


The gloop looks very similar to school dinner tomato soup.......  :lol: :lol:


Send me your addy David....we wouldn't want it to go to waste now would we....... :ddb:

BLEURRRR!!!!!!!!
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Offline Bernd

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2009, 08:36:42 AM »
And a quick sand blast and it would look like new.  :thumbup:

Nice experiment there Darren.  :ddb:  :ddb:

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Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2009, 08:49:42 AM »
I just realised something..... :doh:

I used Soda Crystals aka washing soda not Caustic Soda......

This is much less aggressive and safer to your skin etc, the mixture can even be thrown on the garden when you are done as some plants will benefit from the iron content.

A caustic soda mix would really need to be disposed of carefully.

Now that I have seen that the mild solution strips paint off I'll probably not try the caustic soda as I really see no need.
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Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #9 on: August 24, 2009, 08:52:23 AM »
Bernd, no need for the blasting, it really is stripped back down to the base metal. The pic's are not showing this too well.... :thumbup:
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Offline CrewCab

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #10 on: August 24, 2009, 12:47:23 PM »
Nice one Darren  :thumbup: ................ though I'm with David D, the  garden can have the soup  :lol:

CC

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #11 on: August 24, 2009, 02:08:08 PM »
For smaller parts and a little less exotic setup, you could try this.

http://www.arceurotrade.co.uk/Catalogue/New-Products/Shield-Technology-Products

Horses for courses.

Bogs

Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #12 on: August 24, 2009, 02:30:12 PM »
No thanks.....far too expensive...I've been down that route many times in the past.

There is nothing exotic about what I'm doing. It's just a bucket, some scrap metal, water and about 20 pence worth of washing soda that will last a very long time.

OK I'm using a fancy power supply, but an old phone charger would work equally as well.

Electrical cost, well 500ma at 5V is 2.5W, that's about 250hrs to use one unit of electricity at around 14 pence. So around 1.3p per 24hrs


That £12 tub wouldn't be enough to clean my one part, never mind the rest of it. You'd be better off with a 26p jar of vinegar, it'll do the same job.
Or a gallon of brick cleaner from your building merchant, mix with wallpaper paste and you're away.
And then there is the de-greasing and paint stripping to be done before hand....


Of course all this only works if you can submerge the part.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2009, 02:32:01 PM by Darren »
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Offline Bluechip

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #13 on: August 24, 2009, 03:16:22 PM »
I'm with you Darren, used your method a lot, 12V 2A wall wart is series with a  55W headlamp bulb. (Won't light up much BTW)

Good for getting ally pinning out of files.

You can use it with non-submerged parts, use a flannel 'poultice', tape the anode to it. Keep it wet.

Works well, dump the bit in, leave it to it.

My sort of energetic activity  :D

Dave BC

 

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Offline Jonny

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #14 on: August 24, 2009, 03:20:26 PM »
Nice one never thought of trying that. Thought those electrolytic cleaners were something special.
For general metal cleaning you can boil metals with washing soda.

I have a couple of psu's i used for my anodising, one dual output very similar to yours the other a Maplin 0-30V analogue jobby as backup.

You say this removes the rust to base level, therefore if say thin walled tube with pitt marks would it eventually remove in the holes without eroding what you want to keep?
 

Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #15 on: August 24, 2009, 03:30:33 PM »
Dave that reminds me, I used to use Caustic Soda mixed with water and wallpaper paste to strip paint of woodwork, doors and such.

Make the goey mixture up, cover the door etc and then cover with wet towels and such. Caustic works 100 times better if it's warm. So if you can put the doors outside on a sunny day the results will be amaizing. You have to keep it wet though by sprinkling with a hose now and again.

Glad to hear this de-rusting lark can be done in a similar fashion.

You might want to tell everyone why you use the headlamp bulb....just in case someone tries this without it..... :thumbup:


Jonny,
It should only remove the rust and not touch the base metal. Only try this with steel or iron or you may have a little irreversible disaster on your hands.
That's unless you want to destroy alloy like in Daves files.....good tip.... :thumbup:
« Last Edit: August 24, 2009, 03:55:09 PM by Darren »
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Offline Bluechip

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #16 on: August 24, 2009, 03:31:06 PM »
Johnny,  as far as I know, it is non-aggressive. I have certainly left stuff in for several days, all it does is gets the rust off.

It does get into pits, and cleans 'em out.

I usually scrub the bit off with detergent, dry it, then slap some 'Bondaprimer' on it.

Some steel I did several years ago is still rust free.


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Offline Bluechip

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #17 on: August 24, 2009, 03:40:17 PM »
Darren,

I was first shown this  method about 40 yrs. ago by a guy who was a 'conservator', used to tart up stuff for museums.

The first occasions I did it was with a Davenset Charger, mit selenium rectifier thingy.

He told me to use a limiter, so I always have. I presume 'cos ham-fisted varmints like myself cannot be trusted to assemble the contraption without shorting the thing out. No benign current limiters in those days ... just popped fuses. Or poisonous rectifiers gaily blazing away. ...
Ah, happy days of long departed youth ...

I suppose I could stick one together, and meter it. Or just assume the geezer knew why even if I don't ..

Dave BC

« Last Edit: August 24, 2009, 03:41:56 PM by Bluechip »
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Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #18 on: August 24, 2009, 04:05:31 PM »
Being a cheapskate I've tried ordinary garage floor paint on metalwork with some surprisingly good results. Even painted onto firm rust it seems to hold fast for many years.

It's what will be going on this pillar drill....... :dremel:
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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #19 on: August 24, 2009, 04:46:31 PM »
Darren,

It is a bit far back in the post now, and I wasn't trying to detract from your post, far from it.

But for people that don't have the facilities you have, mine was an easy, although expensive second option, and they should also be given the chance to be considered, rather than just being thrown to one side, with very derogatory comments, as though everyone should go out and equip themselves to do it your way.

As I said, we don't all have the bits and bobs plus space to do it like you do. It might seem normal to you to have barrels and power supplies laying about, but to a lot of us, it isn't.

But sometimes, we need to get rid of rust as well.

Because of that, what I suggested is the way I would go, if I had rust to get rid of.

John

Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #20 on: August 24, 2009, 06:56:58 PM »
John, Sorry if I sounded dismissive, it wasn't meant to be offensive, but rather hopefully informative.

You were referring to a small part, that could be done on the bench in a jam jar, 1/4 teaspoon of soda and either a car battery charger or an old mobile phone charger
(but this should be done outside because of the explosive hydrogen gas produced, so room really doesn't come into it for most people)

Smaller parts should take less time so it might be done in an hour.

But rather than spend £12, a 26p jar of vinegar would achieve exactly the same result and come with it's own jar. I also gave some other options.

I have over the years had the need to de-rust many parts, and as such tried most methods inc an awful lot of propriety products. I have even imported them from the US at great cost.

Of them all just one product shone above all the rest, (in fact the rest gave pretty mediocre results in my opinion) a product called "Metal Ready" from the US but don't expect it to be cheap as it comes in gallons. They all share one thing in common, they contain acids of some description that does the work. The rest of the goo is just a carrier.

The truth is vinegar or builders cement mixer cleaner are not only cheap but is also just about as effective. cement cleaner esp so. Heck it the same acid as the propriety products use and normally at a 16% concentration so it's stronger.

I have never tried electrolysis to remove rust before, but I have to say it beats all of the other products hands down. There is no question about that in my mind now that I have tried it for myself.

If someone can't rig together a small vat with the necessary parts then they really are not trying very hard are they?

Washing up bowl, water, washing powder, cleaning agent or even salt, (even just plain water will work, it'll just take longer), a piece of scrap metal, small power source being a car charger, phone charger or even a battery even if it's out of your car.
It's so simple I cannot imagine anyone here does not have this stuff to hand or can't pop to the store tomorrow to fill the missing pieces of the jigsaw.

Most people can set this up without spending a penny, like I did....it's not hard.

But if you'd rather make someone else rich then that's your prerogative, I really can't afford to cos I'm poor ...... :thumbup:
« Last Edit: August 24, 2009, 07:18:19 PM by Darren »
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Offline dsquire

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #21 on: August 24, 2009, 10:32:29 PM »
Dave that reminds me, I used to use Caustic Soda mixed with water and wallpaper paste to strip paint of woodwork, doors and such.

Make the goey mixture up, cover the door etc and then cover with wet towels and such. Caustic works 100 times better if it's warm. So if you can put the doors outside on a sunny day the results will be amaizing. You have to keep it wet though by sprinkling with a hose now and again.

Darren

In order to keep from drying out you can wrap with clear plastic to keep the air from drying it out. Then you can lay it in the sun to keep warm until such time as it has striped the paint. This saves the wet rags and sprinkling which tends to dilute the solution and slows it down. :med:

Cheers :beer:

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Offline shred

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #22 on: August 24, 2009, 10:41:20 PM »
I've used the electrolytic process as well as a number of the goops. 

We did a test with members of the metalworking group-- I took some 12L14 bar, noted for it's rusting ability, turned a very fine thread on it (to check on material removal and catch people jigging the test), degreased it and left it outside for a month.   Chopped it into sections and handed them out to be de-rusted by the members' favorite goops.

Of all them, Electrolytic came in a close second, the winner being Evap-o-rust-- a non-acid solution available around here for ~$20/gal, and re-useable many times over.  In addition to being slightly better on rust removal, it also sidesteps the hydrogen embrittlement that rumor has it can go with the electrolytic method if used on tools and the like.
 
Anyway, either far beats the rest of the competition.

Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #23 on: August 25, 2009, 05:12:57 AM »
Thanks Don, a plastic sheet.....oh so simple....... :doh:

Shred,

I looked up Evap-O-Rust and although they don't give much away it sounds suspiciously similar to Metal Ready, could be the same thing?

With Metal Ready I found it ate surface rust in a flash, was really quite amazing to watch. The largest parts I de-rusted were some 8x4 metal sheets I was using to fabricate floor plans for my Lotus 7 build.
I found while it was excellent with tackling surface rust, anything in a poorer state was still a problem needing abrasive action needed to be taken first.

The one thing that has really tickled me with this electo method is that it strips paint off at the same time. That can be a time consuming task on it's own... :dremel:



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bogstandard

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #24 on: August 25, 2009, 06:31:34 AM »
Darren,

In my very young days, I used to hang around with a budding archeaologist, and he had read about your process somewhere for cleaning artifacts. It might have been a different chemical used.

So he set the experiment up on the table, and using some very dirty and encrusted roman coins (they abound around the area I live, very close to Watling Street), and he gave it a go. It worked fine, until he got too greedy, and decided to leave them in a bit longer than suggested, to clean out the heavily pitted stuff. Came back a few hours later, and all detail was missing off the coins, just blank discs.

Now I think this might relate to you comment about removing paint. I don't think it actually attacks the paint, but removes a very thin layer of metal, so the paint flakes away because what it was bonded to, isn't there for it to bond to any more.

Might be right, might be wrong, but maybe another slant on the process.

John

Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #25 on: August 25, 2009, 07:08:21 AM »
Interesting John, I know not the answer...

I was thinking that Soda Crystals (Sodium Carbonate Na2CO3 ) is basically a mild relative to Caustic Soda (Sodium Hydroxide NaOH) Both made from common salt (Sodium Chloride NaCI) I believe via an electrolytic process. The process removes the Chloride and adds the Hydrogen from water.

The point is they are all some form of salts and there are many others.

My thinking is that the chemical softens the paints over a period of hours.The hydrogen formed at the cathode surface expands and pushes the paint off under pressure.
Because we have made the part negative no oxygen is formed on the part so even though it's immersed in salts the chemical elements needed to cause corrosion are not present.
This makes the process non invasive to the subject being de-rusted.

However, at the sacrificial positive anodes we have the oposite story. Oxygen is formed on the surface and a rapid evasive process takes place. If you want to rust something quickly and violently then this should do the trick.

It's worth remembering that while the current is kept flowing, your part (as long as it's at negative potential) will come to no harm as it's protected by hydrogen. Switch the current off and the oxygen in the water can now get to your piece and combined with the salts with soon start to attack your subject.


That's how I understand the process.....but I could be wrong as I failed chemistry badly.....
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Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #26 on: August 25, 2009, 08:00:52 PM »
Moving on a little I decided that doing half an item and then turning it over was not only taking double the time but also lead to a problem. When the object was turned over the bare side poking out of the mixture rusted at a phenomenal rate. I assume due to the evaporating water from below and and chemicals or gasses present.

The answer seems to be to totally submerge the part. I rigged up another container and used the round barrel to start off the process on the drill main column. As you can see the column is only half in. Therefore I will be rigging up another container tomorrow to do it properly.

Indecently, almost everyone, in the UK at least, has a suitable container for an item around this size. But you'll have to wait and see what I come up with.... :ddb:





So while those two were fermenting ( I hadn't "discovered" the big bucket at this point) I made a start on the drill stand which was in a bit of a sorry state...I'm using a small angle grinder with a flap wheel type disk.
Nothing fancy here just a good clean up ready for painting as I know the stand will get knocked about from experience.



All done, didn't come out too bad in the end



I like to be able move my tools about, esp if I need to make room, but mostly to make cleaning easier. This drill is heavy so I'm putting some wheels on the back of the frame.





The idea is that you can lift the front and all four feet will lift off the floor. It'll still be heavy but at least moveable single-handedly.
The wheels are not here to support anything, it still sits on all four feet.



« Last Edit: August 25, 2009, 08:09:56 PM by Darren »
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Offline John Hill

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #27 on: August 25, 2009, 10:19:22 PM »
Whoohoo!  Be careful with your 'drill on wheels' Darren!  If you lift the front it will not have to come up very high before it wants to tip over backwards and you will be hard pressed to stop it!  (Now how would I know about such things?)
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Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #28 on: August 26, 2009, 04:43:15 AM »
Thanks for the heads up John....hadn't crossed my mind...... :doh:

It's top heavy init.....umm what to do now as I can see exactly what you mean.......
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Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #29 on: August 26, 2009, 05:08:01 AM »
I think the simple answer is to move the wheels further back to alter the balance position and centre of gravity.

I can do that.... :)
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Offline John Hill

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #30 on: August 26, 2009, 05:12:37 AM »
Darren, I am sure you will figure something suitable.   I had a close shave with my cut-off saw which was mounted on a similar stand.  I have solved the problem (in my mind  :med:) and will 'one day' fit some sort of socket on the front of the stand so that I can put a long handle (maybe 3 feet of 2" water pipe, or sumfink) which will get me back in control when moving the machine, meanwhile I am very careful!

Did you fabricate the stand? It looks a neat job.

From the den of The Artful Bodger

Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #31 on: August 26, 2009, 05:16:52 AM »
Thanks John,

Yes I was thinking a pull out bar would give much more leverage and thus control.
I made the stand about 20yrs ago from what I had laying around, nice and solid... :thumbup:
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Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #32 on: August 26, 2009, 08:16:39 AM »
The current status after a good wash, pretty good condidering all the cement that this was covered in .I didn't clean any muck or grease off this time before I started just to see if it could cope. It did......not problem with that at all.. :thumbup:

This was too long for the middle section to fit in the solution



So as I said before I needed a bigger bucket.....so here it is..do you recognise it.... :lol:



To save my good steel bars which so far seem unaffected I purchased some re-bar from the local merchants, but any scrap will do.

Helen being the wonderful girl she is brought me a shiny new bag of washing soda from her shopping trip yesterday..this is 1KG at 59 pence.



I used this much this time around, about 100g



Chucked it in the bucket and filled with water.

As another experiment I'm trying a phone charger for the power supply. I didn't cut the end off and bare the wires as this one has another use, but it may be best if a proper connection is made. This one is 5V at 500ma or 0.5 amps if you prefer. Be sure to check the polarity before you connect....!! It's the diagram just above "Made in China" Or if you snip and bare the ends of the wires best check with a meter.



Initially I'm getting 4.8V at 350ma, but the ma may yet go up as the process gets under way. We'll have to wait and see.

A set up like this is perfectly happy outside, so any space in the garden will do, and it does not look unsightly too boot..... :thumbup:



« Last Edit: August 26, 2009, 08:19:25 AM by Darren »
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Offline Stilldrillin

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #33 on: August 26, 2009, 12:37:08 PM »
You got me wondering earlier Darren...... I couldn`t think of a larger bucket.......  ::)

How will the solution cope with grass cuttings?  :D

David D

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Still modifying bits of metal... Occasionally, making an improvement!

Offline Jonny

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #34 on: August 26, 2009, 01:14:09 PM »
Excellent Darren and Dave cant wait to give it a try. I did mention it at work today which raised some eyebrows, if it goes wrong its £11k to replace.
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Offline Andy

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #35 on: August 26, 2009, 03:38:49 PM »
This is brilliant Darren. I've been following this with interest. Cheap, easy, not much effort =  :D

When you said about using a larger container that most households have I thought you were going to suggest the bath for a minute...  :bugeye:

The only commercial product that I've had any real success with is Metal Ready. Far too expensive for big jobs though. Used it for de-rusting inside motorcycle fuel tanks.
From probably the smallest, dampest and most untidy workshop in Bradford, West Yorks, England, if not the world..

Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #36 on: August 26, 2009, 05:32:52 PM »
Thanks for the feedback guys, as many of you will know this is not a new idea by any means. There are quite a few pages on the net covering this.

This is an interesting one using a towel as Dave BC suggested earlier..http://madmodder.net/index.php?action=post;topic=1651.30;num_replies=35

David D...wot grass cuttings.....we have sheep around here ya know.... :lol:

Jonny, just what is this metal part at 11K......you might want to look up Hydrogen embrittlement before you give this a go. It really doesn't affect our parts, but if you are working with a "critical" part it may. It's not permanent though and can be eliminated my heating the part afterwards. It's to do with the hydrogen forming on the surface of the subject. Some also forms inside the metal and due to the hydrogen expansion it can put pressure on the part. Not to the point of actually breaking it, but it does reduce integrity to a small degree. Like I said it does subside as the hydrogen finds it's way out over time.

For our needs it is of no consequence.

Andy, yep Metal Ready is pretty good I agree. But to do this pillar drill would cost more than the drill is worth.



So a progress report, the contents of the bucket are fermenting nicely  :) The mobile charger is coping fine and the ma rose to 480ma as expected, prob due to the iron content of the water helping conductivity.
But it's a little on the slow side, prob due to the large size of the part and the low ma I guess. So I have changed to a charger giving 1.5A or 1,500ma output tonight and instantly the difference is obvious.






 
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Offline sbwhart

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #37 on: August 27, 2009, 01:21:22 AM »
Hi Darren interesting thread  :thumbup:. keen to see how your charger works out with it, I think i may rig a small bath up to do some old tools that could do with a de-rust

Have fun

Stew
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Offline Bluechip

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #38 on: August 27, 2009, 04:16:42 AM »
Crikey,this ones going on a bit .. :D

I wonder if my received wisdom to use a current limiter is relevant to the hydrogen embrittlement aspect.

Maybe the effect is much reduced or eliminated by a long soak at a very low current ?

Just a thought.

There are fairly large plastic box things in the DIY sheds from time to time. Cheapish.
The sort used to store toys etc. Focus have 'em anyway, although it's a year or so since I got one.

If everyone has a go at this the price of washing soda is going to jump in a bit, world shortage imminent ..  :D

Dave BC



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Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #39 on: August 28, 2009, 05:17:43 PM »
Stew,

Considering the main column casting has already been done once, and then put into this fresh solution then I believe the little phone charger is doing a grand job.. :thumbup:



However, the first charger I tried died after about 8hrs, the second is sill going strong after almost 30hrs. (I'm not ready to take it out just yet so I'm leaving it in there)
The difference between the chargers is that the one that died was an unregulated type, and the current one has a  regulated output. (This means it can't overload itself and thus burn out) This gets back to what David BC advised earlier with adding a car headlamp bulb in series to limit the current.  :thumbup:

In the other vat I removed and washed down the baseplate....one thing I have noticed about bare cast iron is that rust forms instantly without protection.



So I dried it with a powerful electric paint stripper, got my paint ready, wiped it over with some white spirit which removed the flash rust and painted it. I used poly floor paint with a touch of white spirit to thin it slightly to help with brush marks. You have to get on with it as floor paint dries pretty quickly.



This is just the first coat, it will have another tomorrow.


Onto the stand.
I wanted to reposition the wheels further back so fabricated some brackets on the mill.



Welded them in place and at the same time added a middle shelf from some old bed iron and a handle on the front to make moving it about easier and safer. All parts were de-rusted.
It may be interesting to note that the smaller parts took only an hour or so to de-rust.

The stand was then given it's first coat of paint with a small roller.



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Offline Stilldrillin

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #40 on: August 29, 2009, 02:16:36 AM »
By `ek Darren....... 

That stand looks great! Right proffessional......  :clap:

Not too sure of that bin of tomato summator other........  :lol: :lol:

David D
David.

Still drilling holes... Sometimes, in the right place!

Still modifying bits of metal... Occasionally, making an improvement!

Offline John Hill

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #41 on: August 29, 2009, 05:26:39 AM »
Looks good Darren,  if you have a moment would you please knock up another and send it over for my chop saw?

Ta muchly! :med:
From the den of The Artful Bodger

Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #42 on: August 29, 2009, 11:40:31 AM »
First thing in the morning John.... :thumbup:
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Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #43 on: August 29, 2009, 05:27:54 PM »
Well this is how the column turned out



Nice to see the detail unharmed



And the other side, note the brass plate was also unharmed, just looks polished up but no harm has come to the raised lettering at all



So now we have it clean better slap some paint on it....



Shall I detail ....?




The base plate and stand were also given their second coat of paint today...while I had the brush out..... :dremel:
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Offline sbwhart

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #44 on: August 29, 2009, 05:34:15 PM »
Darren thats brilliant

Cleaned up great
 :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

Stew
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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #45 on: August 29, 2009, 05:50:46 PM »
Darren,

I hope you aren't going to be painting your floor with the same paint.

I can imagine you walking round and bumping into all the camouflaged machinery.  :lol:


Bogs

Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #46 on: August 29, 2009, 06:03:07 PM »
Very good John, very good.... :clap:

it'd be like one of those modern white rooms........ :doh:


Talking of which, it almost got pained white, the paint is here.....I never was very good a making decisions....I still might yet....... :scratch:


Stew, the nicest thing about all this is just how little effort it all takes. The old way was such a pain most tools just got a cover up inc chips, chunks, rust an' all.
Add the fact that the whole process inc paint will cost about £10 or less, then it's a no brainer....

I painted my lathe with floor paint, comes in quite a few colours, it's tough (just think of the punishment it gets on the floor) It paints easily. I just brush it on and then run a small roller over it to give a nice finish. Lastly you don't need a hundred brushes or rollers as they keep/wash in white spirit till next time they are needed.



Shall I paint it white........ :bang:
« Last Edit: August 29, 2009, 06:07:38 PM by Darren »
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Offline John Hill

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #47 on: August 29, 2009, 08:49:48 PM »


I painted my lathe with floor paint...........

Eh what?  YOU PAINTED YOUR LATHE?  I Turtle Wax mine after every use... :med:
From the den of The Artful Bodger

Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #48 on: August 30, 2009, 05:59:49 AM »


Eh what?  YOU PAINTED YOUR LATHE? 

Er yes, isn't yours painted..... :doh:
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Offline Stilldrillin

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #49 on: August 30, 2009, 06:09:48 AM »


Eh what?  YOU PAINTED YOUR LATHE? 

Er yes, isn't yours painted..... :doh:

Mine still is....... In a few places!  :D
David.

Still drilling holes... Sometimes, in the right place!

Still modifying bits of metal... Occasionally, making an improvement!

Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #50 on: September 02, 2009, 05:02:14 PM »
Here's what vertical floor paint looks like John H,

Not the best, but certainly functional. It's been a while since I painted this so areas are starting to go where the most abuse takes place. It mainly the swarf that does the damage and I guess that would affect any type of paint.

A fivers worth of paint has done itself proud to last this well over the last couple of years and I feel and it still looks a million times better than when I bought it.

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Offline John Hill

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #51 on: September 02, 2009, 06:00:39 PM »
Darren, the Chinese lathe is covered in some expoxy paint in an off-white colour.  Very nice in the showroom!

There are a couple of 'dings' in mine, that I didnt do, but the saddle area is getting quite marked as unless every scrap of metal chip etc has been removed a wipe off with a rag causes scratches which in turn absorb gunge and then look unsightly!
From the den of The Artful Bodger

Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #52 on: September 10, 2009, 06:20:42 PM »
Time for a little update..... :)

When dismantling stuff I like to take quite a few pictures so that I may refer back to them when trying to remember what goes where. Most stuff only fits one way or not at all, but occasionally those pictures can be a lifesaver. Not mine, but maybe the dogs...... :lol:

I'm not going to show you all my wonderful snaps....thankfully...but here's one that shows the spindle nose and bearing housing cap. neither in particularly good cosmetic condition though they both function well enough.



I decided to make a new bearing cap from some free cutting steel (Stew  :beer:) Simple enough so I won't go into too much detail.



Once it was machined I used the old cap to act as a drilling jig and a socket to locate the centre.



And here's the result





You can see here the old one has had some abuse....before my time I might add.....



Fitted nice and snugly..... :D



I decided to clean up the nose as it was in a well battered state. I only took one picture........ :doh:



But it did not lathe very well at all. The finish was awful. So I stuck an air die grinder in the tool holder and had my first ever go at spindle grinding?
My compressor simply could not keep up, so the speed was too low. Also I currently can't run my lathe in top speeds till I've sorted the garage electrics properly (volt drop on the long extension to the RC) so the lathe was too slow as well..... :doh: :doh: :doh:

Finish didn't look like a precision grind, but it was better than the lathed finish. No pic but here it is assembled back on the machine.



So here we are to date, cept I've been painting more bits tonight........got to keep busy eh....!!


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Offline sbwhart

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #53 on: September 11, 2009, 01:21:00 AM »
Looking a tidy job Darren, just need some balls turning for them handles:-  :proj:

 :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Have fun

Stew
A little bit of clearance never got in the road
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Location:- Crewe Cheshire

Offline Stilldrillin

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #54 on: September 11, 2009, 02:26:56 AM »
By `ek Darren!

That`s a big improvement! Well done.....  :clap:

David D
David.

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Still modifying bits of metal... Occasionally, making an improvement!

Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #55 on: September 17, 2009, 08:51:22 AM »
I was using it yesterday, will be again today to drill 1" holes in 10mm thick steel in stacks of four....

First tried piloting with a 10mm drill bit and then the 1", then tried just the 1" with no pilot holes. It prefers the latter being much smoother....odd, but that's what it seems to like.

One inch holes with no pilot hole and it cuts like butter....huge chips...... :dremel:

Camera battery ran out so no pic's, I'll take some today...making some hinges...... :ddb:
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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #56 on: February 02, 2010, 04:29:58 PM »
Hi Darren

GREAT thread ,very interesting mate  :clap: , i have never seen rust removal done that way .good use of things from around the house too, I think i may have to give it ago .
and the machines turned out great . :thumbup:

Cheers Rob


Offline Space Fan

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #57 on: February 04, 2010, 08:00:22 PM »
Hello,
This a great restoration you've done! After reading this thread yesterday I had to try this rust removal technique.  I wish I had a before pic of these long pliers. They would not even open they were so rusty.

This pic is after a prime and some yellow paint after an overnight soak in electrons and baking soda. Yellow because they are my swarf grabbers again. They work like new. Thanks for the the idea.  Now I need more rusty things to immerse!
Barry


Offline Darren

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #58 on: February 04, 2010, 08:36:41 PM »
That's great Barry,
It's so easy I wonder why anyone does it any other way as it removes paint an grease at the same time.

I've even freed up a very stuck Jacobs chuck this way too  :dremel:
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Offline Space Fan

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Re: Rust Removal
« Reply #59 on: February 04, 2010, 11:10:02 PM »
Yes. I'm thinking I could have cleaned up my lathe and mill using this technique rather than acid and sanding.  I think it was phosphoric acid. I could have done a better job on the chuck for sure, Scratches all over.

Oh well, there will be more rust. :)