Author Topic: Penny Farthing Bicycle  (Read 99594 times)

Offline Powder Keg

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Penny Farthing Bicycle
« on: August 21, 2010, 10:46:02 AM »
Ever since I was little I wanted one of these. A few years ago I nearly started building one. But I couldn't locate anything suitable to make the tires out of. Recently I found a fellow in Ohio that sells it\o/ So work has began.

In case you don't know what a Penny Farthing Bike is here is a well made example from Finland. About half way through there are some nice stills of the pieces that he made.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OptGmDkEwJs

I have steadily been making parts for this project. I have taken design elements from bikes that I've only seen pictures of. The rest is my own ideas of how a Hiwheel bike should be. Since they are mostly wheel I started there. How the heck am I going to make a wheel???

First I needed to make a roll. I've always wanted a roll, but, I've never had a project where I actually "needed" a roll. Now I need both\o/ I found some pictures on the net of some simple rolls and started there. I made some dies to roll 3/4" X 3/4" X 1/8" angle so the pointy part was inward. Nothing fancy. It doesn't even have any bearings.  I'll have to take a few pictures of it.

Good news!! It worked :ddb: I now have a 48" and a 16" rim. They made them up to 60". But you have to have longer legs than me to operate something like that:o)



I made the axle next. I had some mystery stainless to play with. At first I thought it would go pretty quickly. Wrong!!! I had to take pretty light cuts, slow feed, with oil. Or my inserts would break. But I eventually got through it. I used a N-05 locknut to hold everything together. They require a washer and a key-way milled into the shaft. I'm still waiting for the washers. I'll cut all the key-ways then.







The frames on some of these bikes get narrow near where the rear forks attach. Not knowing how to taper tubing??? I made an insert. It is drilled out so it's not to heavy. The rear step will probably be welded or bolted to this. This will be welded to the frame.



On the axle, hooked to the forks is usually a bearing carrier. This will also let me remove the wheel, by removing two bolts,  if needed. I made the round part on my lathe then cut it in half. One for each side. I milled out the other pieces and beveled them a little to prepare them for welding.



I bolted a spacer between the ears and clamped the pieces to my bench and tig welded them together.





A lot of filing and grinding. They are nearly done. When I get them to my liking, I'll have them bead blasted.





I have been trying to find something nice to make the forks out of. I ran across this at work.



That looks like bicycle forks, doesn't it??? To me it does:o) I chucked it in my lathe and cleaned it up with emery paper. Then I marked it out and cut a couple strips out of the pipe. I clamped a straight edge to the pipe that would guide my thin cut blades on my grinder.



Maybe this will look more like forks? They have a nice taper to them. I like how they turned out. I think I'm going to weld a couple of bands on them to make them look nice. They warped a little, but I can fix that.





Here is where I'm at. Today I'm going to try and get the steering pivot made and the hubs turned. The hubs will be bronze.









Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline sbwhart

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2010, 12:46:25 PM »
This looks very interesting  :mmr: I'll be following this one

Nice work  :thumbup:

Stew
A little bit of clearance never got in the road
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Location:- Crewe Cheshire

Offline raynerd

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2010, 04:53:53 PM »
This is super! I`m looking forward to further progress....keep the pictures flowing!!  :ddb:

Call me Mr Thicky, I am when it comes to engineering, but I just can`t figure how "the roll" works and formed the wheels?
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Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2010, 06:16:00 PM »
Here I have the steering pin nearly done. There will be a slot cut in the rings so I can weld it flush to the neck.



Here are some pictures of the roll. It's a very simple one. There are 2 idler wheels and the top drive wheel. There is a bottle jack under the two idler wheels. I would give it a pump and roll the angle through. Another pump and another roll through. till you have a circle :ddb:







Now I'm off to the bronze hubs\o/
 :ddb: :ddb: :ddb: :ddb: :ddb:
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline raynerd

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2010, 06:58:00 PM »
Ahhh, those extra pics explain a lot! thanks....looking good!

Chris
Youtube: craynerd
Projects at - www.raynerd.co.uk

Offline Brass_Machine

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2010, 07:35:50 PM »
Wow Wes,

You have been busy. Love the Roll. I want to buy/build one someday (for bike frames). Love the Penny Farthing bicycles. Can't wait to see this out!

Eric
Science is fun.

We're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2010, 08:38:41 PM »
I've been sticking with it pretty steady here lately. A buddy and I made a heavier duty roll for frame tubes. He builds frames. I made the 1.5" dies for him. We rolled the backbone for my penny last weekend on it. I guess I better post pictures of that roll to. sorry no action shots.
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline andyf

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2010, 09:15:07 PM »
Will there be any brakes, Wesley, or will you just do a swift rearward dismount if trouble looms? Even if you only make a three-quarter farthing with a 48", rather than 60", wheel, it's still a long way to the ground if you have to wait at a T junction for a gap in the traffic.



Andy
Sale, Cheshire
I've cut the end off it twice, but it's still too short

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2010, 09:35:50 PM »
Spoon brake like this.



I will still have to get off. my feet won't touch the ground :bugeye:
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Rob.Wilson

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2010, 04:42:23 PM »
  :bugeye: Outstanding job  Wes



Very interesting project ,,,you sure have a wide range of interests/projects  :bow: :bow: :bow:

Regards Rob

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2010, 05:07:59 PM »
I'm pretty excited about this project. I found a neat seat that I'm going to make for mine.



It'll make it look more authentic to.
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline Ned Ludd

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2010, 05:21:00 PM »
Have a care as to where you fit a brake to your Ordinary. They tend not to be fitted to the front wheel as it makes you take a nose dive if applied. :( They can, however, be fitted to the rear wheel, but may require advance notice, in triplicate, before being applied.
Ned
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Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2010, 06:35:40 PM »
I'll be taking it easy that's for sure Ned:o) I might add a brake to the rear I'll have to see how this works out. Still a lot of work yet to do before I need to worry about brakes :ddb:
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline j45on

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2010, 06:42:17 PM »
Great work so far and I'm loving that roller  :thumbup:
Can't wait to see more.
Jason

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2010, 09:18:22 PM »
I have the hubs nearly half done. They are turning out nice. The material is 4.5" Bronze shaft. They will each be drilled and tapped 30 holes for 5-40 threads. I think. I need to get the thread nipples here.





I should have these ready to drill the spoke holes in a day or so? We'll see how things go.

Thanks for watchin :ddb: :nrocks: :ddb: :nrocks: :ddb:
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline DMIOM

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #15 on: August 23, 2010, 03:46:55 AM »
I'll be taking it easy that's for sure Ned:o) I might add a brake to the rear I'll have to see how this works out. Still a lot of work yet to do before I need to worry about brakes :ddb:

This puts me in mind of an occaision which made an impression on me when I was a teenager. A local "inventor" had produced a prototype jet-powered car, and whereas ships are launched by the VIP cracking a bottle of champagne on the bow, in this case he invited the Lieutenant Governor (a relic of our colonial past) to take it for a run up & down the runway of a recently decommissioned airbase at Jurby. What impressed me was that the first thing the Governor, an ex-RAF fast jet jockey, said out loud was "Before I start this thing, show me and let me be certain I know how to stop it ......" :thumbup:

Dave

Offline cedge

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #16 on: August 23, 2010, 01:46:56 PM »
Wes
Dunno if you've seen the TV show "Pickers" or not. It's about 2 guys from Iowa whotravel the southern states in search of barn fresh antiques. One show had them finding a "high wheeler" bike that was the same basic design as the one you are working on but the maker had reversed the design so the small wheel was in front instead oat the rear. It was explained that the changes made the bike much easier to ride and eliminated the danger of flipping it when the brake was applied. I thought it was interesting at the time and could see the advantages right off.  You might check for Youtubes or perhaps on the history channel site to see if you can find the episode.

Steve

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #17 on: August 23, 2010, 01:53:07 PM »
Thanks Steve. I saw that one:o) It makes it tough to get on. There are a few vids on You tube though. I'll post some later.
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline Powder Keg

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Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline Ned Ludd

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #19 on: August 23, 2010, 08:55:02 PM »
Back to brakes, I asked a friend of mine, who has an Ordinary, about brakes. His reply amounted to "fine, fit them, as long as they don't actually work".
 His qualifications for advice on these cycles is that he once rode his from London to Czechoslovakia. For you over the other side of the "pond", that's quite a long way. :) about 800 miles each way. Did I mention he is another English eccentric or should that be lunatic? :lol:
Ned
I know enough to do what I do, but the more I know the more I can do!

Leafy suburbs of NW London

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #20 on: August 24, 2010, 11:18:46 AM »
I got quite a bit done on one of the hubs last night. Was too late to post pictures though. I'll do it when I get home\o/

I like hearing these stories. I haven't seen one of these bikes around here for 20 years.
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #21 on: August 24, 2010, 08:55:10 PM »
Made progress on the second hub\o/ I have to make a jig to hold them in the mill to drill the spoke holes. I will need to broach a 1/4" key way in both of them to.







The jig will also let me file the large radius smooth and finish the outside. There will be a couple of angles turned so the spokes enter at a 90 degree to the outside of the hub.
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline Artie

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #22 on: August 25, 2010, 07:39:22 AM »
Did I mention he is another English eccentric or should that be lunatic? :lol:
Ned
\

Hi Ned..... is there a difference? As hes British I suspect not.... and afore ya go off at me.. we're still part of the Empire out here in Aus....
South Wales, wait...NEW South Wales... Batemans Bay.

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #23 on: August 26, 2010, 10:15:39 PM »
I broached the hubs today. I'm going to change the profile a little from what I had planned. The rim will be a little thinner and the skinny area will be tapered some. Man! Its been hot the last day or two. Hard to go out to the shop....
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline villiers

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Re: Penny Farthing Bicycle
« Reply #24 on: August 27, 2010, 08:21:02 PM »
I know a bloke who both makes and races these beasties. In fact he has several of them for different purposes, sprints, races, touring ,etc. I know him through our mutual interest in vintage motorcycles so have only half listened to him when he chats on about sweatwheels. I do remember him remarking that the steering head angle is critical and that despite experimentation he's found that the angle used by the original makers was by far the best and that the best results were found by following the original specifications. He was very positive that the original makers were right on the ball in how they made them. I'm sure he also mentioned they used a plain bearing in the head stem not balls as used in the common bicycle of today as a certain amount of friction there was very necessary.
Sorry I can't be more helpful but I only see him every few months so won't be able to follow up for some time.
Cheers, Villiers Bob