Author Topic: lubrication  (Read 2651 times)

Offline bitsinbobs

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lubrication
« on: January 12, 2009, 06:26:08 PM »
Hi again , the  question is !  what do you think is the best for lathe / milling machine ways ? at the moment i'm using natural graphite on my C3 lathe ( synthetic is not a lub ) and find cuttings do not stick , they tend to fall off    :bugeye: which is :) also not as messy as oil
not where to buy, how to make

bogstandard

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Re: lubrication
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2009, 07:04:40 PM »
B'nB,

For general purpose lubrication I always used to use diesel multigrade motor oil (it has good cleaning properties as well as lubrication), but since I upgraded my machines to modern ones, I have gone for the standard acceptable oils for use on bedways and in gearboxes.

For gearboxes, a medium grade hydraulic fluid, the name should have a 32 in it. ie. Mobil EAL Hydraulic Oil 32.

For slideways, the same sort of thing but with a 68. ie MAGNA BD 68 Slideway Oil.

They should both cost under 20 pounds sterling for 5 litres.

The 32 keeps the sludge in good suspension, and almost all of the gunk comes out in the oil change.

The 68 is rather a sticky solution, but keeps the ways well lubricated because it stays where it is put.

I don't know if these numbers mean anything in other parts of the world, but are definitely valid in the UK, maybe someone can enlighten us.

Hope this has helped.

Bogs.

Offline bitsinbobs

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Re: lubrication
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2009, 05:13:20 PM »
 :doh:   I did'nt  explain that well  ,,, what i meant was to use the graphite as the main lub  as it do'es not attract the swarf , swarf tends to fall away... ta   
                                                         ROB   
not where to buy, how to make

bogstandard

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Re: lubrication
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2009, 06:46:14 PM »
Rob,

You have to be very careful with machine tool lubrication. Otherwise your machine can easily become damaged.

ISO 68 slideway oil has been formulated to form a high pressure layer that keeps the sliding working parts away from each other under high loading, like when you are taking a cut on the lathe. Graphite is a very good lubricant, but no good for slideways. I think you will find that when a heavy cut is put on, you might get metal to metal contact as the very thin film is compressed and dispersed.

68 is very 'sticky', but I would rather clean off the grot, rather than have worn bedways.
My brand new machines already look to be years old because of the oil on them, I lubricate them at the start of every day that they get used.

You can wipe old oil away, you can't put back metal that has been worn off so easily.

Bogs

Offline SPiN Racing

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Re: lubrication
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2009, 02:54:56 PM »
My brand new machines already look to be years old because of the oil on them, I lubricate them at the start of every day that they get used.

Soo Me putting a little spindle oil in the two cups on the side, and giving one full pump to the old Rolls royce style chassis lube thing on the side, is a good thing to do before each day?

I kinda thought I might be overdoing it...
SPiN Racing

bogstandard

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Re: lubrication
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2009, 03:18:26 PM »
All you have to think about when it comes to lubricating any machinery are the costs involved.

How much does it cost to lubricate a machine and keep it running well for years?

                                        or

How much to put right or buy a new machine because it hasn't had enough lubrication and has worn out?


When you work out the figures, it becomes a no brainer decision.

It would cost me about 20 pounds a year for my workshop machinery lubrication (I get it donated for free), so really it is a meagre sum when you consider the benefits.

Bogs