Author Topic: 24' x 35' Workshop Project  (Read 17792 times)

Offline vtsteam

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #25 on: October 20, 2013, 10:24:25 PM »
As long as you get a little done once in awhile, some day you'll be done!

Chipping away at mine most every day. It's come a long way, but still lots to do, including figuring out heat.

Snow is predicted with a 30% chance here for Thursday.  Agggggghh!

No, no, I'm too young to shovel........
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
www.sredmond.com

Offline Bert

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #26 on: October 21, 2013, 10:21:00 PM »
Hi

 I will toss out my 2cents worth re electrical wiring.
  My former shop was the same size as yours and I originally installed plug-ins every 6 feet around the shop at about the 4 foot level. What I found was for the most part they were seldom if ever used, the reason being they were always behind something.
When I insulated and sheeted some years later I took them all out and placed receptacles where it was appropriate for the stationary machines, welders, drill press, compressor etc.. The 2 general use plug inns were put on the ceiling center line  with retractable cord reels. I found for my needs this proved to be a most satisfactory solution. In any event don't overlook the ceiling as a suitable location as long as it is not overly high.

Regards  …Bert

Offline rockknocker

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #27 on: October 23, 2013, 04:19:25 PM »
Bert,

I like your idea of putting outlets on the ceiling. The ceiling in this shop isn't so high that I can't reach it, and I can think of several examples of how they would be useful. A simple screw-in hook would provide a strain relief to prevent the cord's own weight from unplugging itself (make a loose granny knot in the cord and loop it over the hook).

vtsteam,

Good luck with the snow!
Anything is possible when you forget what's impossible.

Offline awemawson

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #28 on: October 23, 2013, 05:01:44 PM »
I use these socket / switch combinations extensively  in both single and three phase versions, and in my welding shop I have them in the ceiling attached to beams for the welders and also my chop saw. They have the advantage that the plug will not come out unless the switch is turned OFF
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline Depaugie

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #29 on: October 25, 2013, 02:24:10 AM »
Hi rockknocker

your workshop is the very same size as mine and its not nearly big enough!!

one of the most useful things in the shop is as much as possible I use castors, on 3no benches, 7x12 band saw, 1m guillotine,
sheet metal off-cut trolly.
I park a 10'x5' trailer out back, so I need to move saw, guillotine, benches to do this.
but this means I can use otherwise dead space.

Another use for mobile benches is, i can configure them to be parallel to the walls or perpendicular to them.
each bench 2'x4' can be used individually or together to support an 8'x4' sheet.

The one other great thing about having as much equipment mobile is that you can CLEAN the the floor under and around them!

As for lighting I fitted 2no rows of 4each  5' twin Florissant's, but they are for a small amount extra electronic  Ballast starters.(probably will fit another 2no in the centre)
I have to say I have had them up over 3 years now and are as good as new, but NO flickering when they start up.
and if you can get them in a weather proof casing, they stay clean. from dust and bugs.

Offline rockknocker

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #30 on: November 29, 2013, 10:12:23 PM »
I'm back! It's been an exciting several weeks here. I took a job closer to home than my old one, and have been spending most of my time finishing up projects at the old job before my last day. I have this week off before I start the new job, and have been using the time to finish up the house's to-do list. That list is now history and I have time to work on the shop for a couple of days!

The lights are working! I've got four 8' fluorescent fixtures installed, and boy what a difference it makes! The bulbs are T12's and aren't as bright or efficient as the newer T8's, but they'll work just fine until I get new ones... and they were free. When I can get more of them, I'll install another bank of 8' fluorescent fixtures on the ceiling above the doors. They'll need to be on their own circuit because when the doors are up they block most of that half of the shop's ceiling. There's no sense having them on at all when the doors are up.

I've been accumulating wood and hardware when I find a good deal on a suitable piece, and have been clearing the junk out of the shop slowly. Thank goodness for Craigslist! :)

Tomorrow I'll finish the work table that I started today and will start tearing plywood off the walls so I can start running electrical wires.
Anything is possible when you forget what's impossible.

Offline Meldonmech

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #31 on: November 30, 2013, 03:46:13 AM »
Hi
       Welcome to MadModder, love the car, what work is planned for it?

                                                                                      Cheers  David

Offline rockknocker

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #32 on: November 30, 2013, 02:21:29 PM »
Hi David, the car is a 1919 model T Ford that my Grandfather built from spare parts before he passed away. It runs and drives, but needs work to make it more reliable. The engine and transmission leak like a sieve, there are dents and dings evenly distributed along the bodywork, much of the woodwork is rotted away, and the electrical is "iffy". However, it is complete (except for the canvas top), and it holds a lot of sentimental value for myself and my family. Also, it was once featured on the cover of "Reminisce" magazine! I plan to start working on it sometime next year.
Anything is possible when you forget what's impossible.

Offline rockknocker

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #33 on: November 30, 2013, 09:09:49 PM »
Well, I only got the table done today. It isn't a work of art, but round objects don't roll off of it of their own accord, and a good whack with a mallet doesn't immediately reduce it to kindling, so it's good enough for me! I put casters on it originally, but didn't like how high the table was with them, so I took them off. I don't want to just cut the legs shorter and put them back on, that's too easy. I'll figure out a way to incorporate them back in.

Today, I was also able to pick up my brother's wood lathe, he hasn't used it in years and is willing to lend it to me indefinitely.
Anything is possible when you forget what's impossible.

Offline Kjelle

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #34 on: December 01, 2013, 02:08:12 PM »
Now that's a good table! I guess 3/4" MDF for table top, 1x4 for the rails and 3x3 or 4x4 for the legs? Sure looks sturdy enought for a workshop.

Keep up the work, I'll follow this thread!

Kjelle

Offline rockknocker

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #35 on: December 01, 2013, 09:09:21 PM »
Actually, the table is a bit larger than the pictures make it look. The top is a 4x8' sheet of 1" thick plywood. I found some that is normally used for concrete forms so one side is smooth and hard. The legs are 4x4's and the rest is 2x6 and 2x4 construction. The critical joints are both lag bolted and glued, the rest is just screwed together. The plywood surface can be removed from the frame (for flipping or replacement) by removing some screws. When the top gets rough from use I'm thinking of installing a sheet of white laminate countertop material.

The wall-mounted workbenches will be made similarly. I want to put most of my tabletop machines on the wall-mounted workbench, so it'll need to be sturdy.

If I end up using the table with electric tools a lot then I may add outlets to the table as well.
Anything is possible when you forget what's impossible.

Offline Kjelle

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #36 on: December 02, 2013, 04:23:59 AM »
You'll need a forklift to move that table!!! :)

Offline RussellT

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #37 on: December 02, 2013, 05:44:33 AM »
You'll need a forklift to move that table!!! :)

Well that saves bolting it down!

Offline rockknocker

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #38 on: September 29, 2014, 04:00:22 PM »
Well, it's time for a long overdue update:

I've been using this shop for projects for quite some time now, even in it's partially-complete state. I have a decent workbench built along most of one wall and my tool storage has improved somewhat, but unfortunately not much progress on the shop itself has been made. Working on projects has been getting in the way of working on my project space...

This is due to change. I recently posted in another thread that my brother is going to move some metalworking machinery into my shop for (at least) the next couple of years. Because of this, the shop is getting re-organized and the long-term plan for it is being modified some. My brother came over this last weekend and helped out for a few hours moving shelving around and preparing for next weekend, when we plan on moving the machinery in.

I've posted a picture of one corner of the shop, along with some pictures of the bigger tools that will be moving in. I'll try to get some more pictures up this week as I work on it after work.
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Offline rockknocker

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #39 on: September 29, 2014, 04:06:54 PM »
I do have one question that has worried me some. The floor in this shop is not likely to be more than 4" thick, although I don't have any data to back that up. We'll be putting a Bridgeport mill that is somewhere between "really heavy" and "fricking heavy" in one corner. Do I need to worry about the weight cracking the floor?

Some Google research has shown that 4" of high-grade concrete (with lots of rebar) is considered the bare minimum to hold machinery of this type. Does anybody here have any experience with this problem?
Anything is possible when you forget what's impossible.

Offline chipenter

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #40 on: September 30, 2014, 03:04:09 AM »
I have seen it done by extending the footprint with 3\4 boiler plate 4 x 3 foot ish , double the area halves the pressure on the floor .
Jeff

Offline rockknocker

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #41 on: October 06, 2014, 10:27:52 AM »
The mill is in its new home, and just needs to be taken off blocks and shimmed level. The lathe is also in and living in a temporary spot, once my garden shed is up some more space will free up and the lathe will end up along one wall.

The shaper, grinder, and horizontal mill are in the corner for the time being, I'm not sure what the plan is for those machines. I'm almost certain the horizontal mill is going to be sold. Anybody interested?

Regarding the floor, I did some research and skimmed through an old army manual on cement floors. There are many people working on thinner floors than mine with much heavier equipment with no issues. I'll risk it.
Anything is possible when you forget what's impossible.

Offline SwarfnStuff

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #42 on: October 07, 2014, 02:02:44 AM »
OK no fair,  :hammer:  you show an old car but it doesn't get a mention. We (well Me anyway,) would like to know make, model and year. Both my brothers have old uns. Both Chevs one a 1926 restored as a ute like many of the farmers here in OZ did to their cars after upgrading to a newer model. The other a 1927, has been restored as the full car so I have a passing interest in the old things.
John B
Converting good metal into swarf sometimes ending up with something useful. ;-)

Offline rockknocker

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #43 on: October 08, 2014, 11:47:50 PM »
The car in question is a 1919 Ford Model T. It runs and drives, but needs some mechanical tlc and some bodywork. This car will be the star of its own thread at some point.

One of my brothers is slowly restoring a '54 Ford F100, and I drove a restored '72 Chevy Custom-20 for several years. Restoring vehicles is not easy, but it is extremely rewarding!

It sounds like your family has a nice collection of oldies!
Anything is possible when you forget what's impossible.

Offline SwarfnStuff

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #44 on: October 09, 2014, 03:00:34 AM »
Yeah, the younger brother (1926 ute) has also restored horse drawn gigs,n sulkies, also a 1956 (I think) Vauxhall that he takes on vintage rallies etc. His house is mostly furnished with antiques. IMHO nice to look at, uncomfortable to sit in. Grumpy Old Man speaking.  :lol:
Converting good metal into swarf sometimes ending up with something useful. ;-)

Offline rockknocker

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Re: 24' x 35' Workshop Project
« Reply #45 on: February 08, 2015, 07:12:57 PM »
I haven't done a good job keeping this thread up-to-date... The shop has been finished (or nearly so) for about a month. With some help from my brother (who was anxious to start using his newly purchased machine tools), we ended up ripping out most of the wall dividing the two halves of the shop. We left some of the wall in place, but cut it short and turned it into a much smaller office. This allows me to move the model T and all other "storables" into the newly created space, massively increasing the amount of floor space available to work in!

With that done, we insulated all the walls, added 110V and 220V outlets to every wall, and buttoned everything back up. We also threw out or donated a lot of items that were taking up space, mainly "future projects" that I would likely never get to. The metalworking machines were all moved to their final resting places and wired in. There are a few small things to finish up (and there always will be), but for the most part everything is working!

I've attached a panoramic picture of the shop so you can see how it's turned out. Ignore the odd angles on everything, those are artifacts of the panoramic photo app on my phone.
Anything is possible when you forget what's impossible.