Author Topic: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox  (Read 21803 times)

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #50 on: October 13, 2013, 08:58:31 AM »
I've just come across this site which deals with finer ways of making toolboxes and lots of other Japanese inspired stuff;

http://www.daikudojo.org/Classes/toolboxes/

Might be a good resource for anyone else who's interested.
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #51 on: October 17, 2013, 04:51:15 AM »
I think I've effected a permanent repair to the GBQ35 Whetstone, if you remember, it looked like this;



Due to the crumbling on the edges, I thought I wouldn’t even be able to glue it back together;



…many “boo hoo hoos” later and a bit of web-looking and following some great advice from a couple of guys on the UKWorkshop site, I thought I might be able to salvage it.  First thing to do was grind the broken edges, here I’m using a concrete paver, left over from the new path and a bit of 2x2 to hold it square;



…to do the next bit I made a guide to hold the next piece at the reverse angle to the first bit;



…and then I “lapped” the ground edges together for a good fit and to correct any angles between them, I was using a contoured tile I found in the garden, possibly a flat one or some glass would be better;






I wish I’d kept the sludge, as I could have mixed this with glue to fill some gaps!  I was left with three regular, non wobbly bits of whetstone;



Not 100% straight but good enough for government work at least;



I left these long enough to dry out and the next day I phoned the local glaziers, who had moved, so are no longer local and within 6 hrs I got delivered a cut to size, ground edged, piece of 6mm laminate glass.  This was a fiver so I recommend these guys;



I was so chuffed with the service I gave the driver a 2 pound note for his efforts.  I had intended to use a flat tile, but there weren't none in the garden.  We had some under the sink once, but since recently fitting new taps (again) I'm not going down there!

Next I got to the repairing bit.  1 packet Hobnobs, ¾ pint tea, two tubes of Araldite normal (found in spare room), some plastic card stuff, glass and the bits of stone.



araldite was mixed, spread on the glass and on the lower sides of the joining edges;



…all the bits were assembled;





and the flattening stone was re-deployed to weigh it all down;




I found I couldn’t put pressure on the ends of the stone to hold the joints together.  Being wedge shaped, they just slid sideways.  I think something rigid on either side would be needed, but as I wasn’t sure if this was normal or rapid Araldite (it turned out to be normal), I didn’t want to hang around to work it out.  Come the morning, everything was looking okay;



I could see the top surface was a little off true and a bit of glue had squirged out the gap;



....so I took it outside to the “flattening station” and it all came right;



It’s a wee bit shorter than it was, but still very much a usable size;



To see if it was up to scratch I took an unfettled plane iron to it.



…and I can safely say it works just as well as it did before I dropped it.  I am also very pleased that spending a fiver saved me having to get a new one.  If I wasn't afeared of the under-sink monsters it could have been free!
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RotarySMP

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #52 on: October 17, 2013, 10:31:02 AM »
Have you tried the Scary Sharp (TM) method using sandpaper? I gave it a try on my plane iron the other day and cerainly won't bother pissing around with trying to keep a whetsone falt anymore.

Between sandpaper from 180 through 2000 grit, my grante surface plate and a quick jig i copied from here http://www3.telus.net/BrentBeach/Sharpen/HPIM0555.jpg I got a way better edge than I'd ever acheive with the whetstone.

Offline jiihoo

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #53 on: October 17, 2013, 10:44:55 AM »
Wheatstone repair instructions filed away for when they will be needed... Thank you!

Jari

Offline Stilldrillin

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #54 on: October 17, 2013, 12:37:05 PM »
Very nicely saved, Ross!  :clap: :clap:

That's proper MadModding, that is......  :thumbup:

David D
David.

Still drilling holes... Sometimes, in the right place!

Still modifying bits of metal... Occasionally, making an improvement!

Offline vtsteam

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #55 on: October 17, 2013, 02:31:22 PM »
I really enjoyed that repair sequence!  :thumbup: :clap:
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
www.sredmond.com

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #56 on: October 18, 2013, 04:49:10 AM »
Have you tried the Scary Sharp (TM) method using sandpaper? I gave it a try on my plane iron the other day and cerainly won't bother pissing around with trying to keep a whetsone falt anymore.
http://www3.telus.net/BrentBeach/Sharpen/HPIM0555.jpg I got a way better edge than I'd ever acheive with the whetstone.

Cheers Rotary SMP :thumbup:

I tried that before getting the whetstones.  I went to some ridiculously fine 3M lapping film after the 2000 wet n' dry and had the opposite experience to you.  It was all fixed on a piece of 8 or 10mm glass.  It was a lot of faffing and difficult to store and eventually I broke it  Maybe if I had more space and a granite surface it would have been easier.  I've found the stones preferable myself and I don't mind flattening them.  Maybe I just find a mindless task therapeutic :med:.  I can quite happily spend as much time sharpening tools as using them!

Thanks for the comments everyone else :wave:
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RotarySMP

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #57 on: November 08, 2013, 04:14:31 PM »
Know what you mean. There is a lot of satisfaction in doing some of these things. I guees I got lucky with the sand paper thing. I don't even bother sticking it down with water, so it just gets stored as a pile of loose papers.

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #58 on: November 08, 2013, 07:20:57 PM »
Know what you mean. There is a lot of satisfaction in doing some of these things. I guees I got lucky with the sand paper thing. I don't even bother sticking it down with water, so it just gets stored as a pile of loose papers.

I think I'm still trying to find a satisfactory sharpening method, the whetstones are good and quick, but the larger grits wear very rapidly, The paper method doesn't "hollow out", but can use a lot of paper, which costs a lot in the UK.  I'm now starting to question the steel of most of my tools.  I've had to resharpen my plane irons twice in less than a couple of hours in oak.  I've got a couple of Japanese chisels on order to see if they hold an edge better in high carbon steel over the alloy steel which most of my cutting tools are made of.
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RotarySMP

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #59 on: November 10, 2013, 11:39:05 AM »
My only plane is cheap indian copy of a Stanley. The blade has been sharpened a few time by me by hand on a wavy whetstone,  and twice with sand paper to straighten it back up. I am making my wife a computor desk out of 72 strips eucalyptus laminated together, and managed to do top and bottom with only a single touch up of the blade.

Offline PekkaNF

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #60 on: November 10, 2013, 12:03:52 PM »
My only plane is cheap indian copy of a Stanley.

Is that Anant? They are about as bad new Stanleys. You can work with them, put they need some serious tuning and while some Anants can be quite acceptable, some are really bad. Once I had a chance go trough about 7 Anant rabbet planes (new in the boxes on the shop) and while they are rated OK on the magazines, I could not find a one that I would take to my workshop to rebuild (I have a milling machine, lathes etc.) It could be that it was cream-of-the-cream what was left. One anant jack plane I used had pretty thin blade. Don't get me wrong, they are something I could use, but if I had a choice, I would buy used stanley.  Often it's the same price and both can be lemons, but good old stanley beats hands down all new cheap competion. They are really much better. Just make sure they are made before 70s, after that Stanleys went downhill.

I ordered three old Baileys (something like ¤4, #5, ¤6) for 150€ from England including shipping. My idea was that if one was pretty good and the other had faults or something to work I would be happy. All three were old/used but VERY useable. Just sharppened the irons, adjusted the chipbreaker and went away. Sometimes I get lucky.

But it's the man not the tool that makes the work. Your table looks good.

Pekka

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #61 on: November 10, 2013, 12:53:41 PM »
Rotary SMP, nice looking job, but a bit scarily large looking, do you have arms like Popeye now?  I bought an Anant No4 and it's generally fine, I think I got lucky with mine.
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RotarySMP

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #62 on: November 12, 2013, 04:55:33 PM »
It is 170 x 72 x 4 cm. planning it was a good work out. It is an Anant plane I bought. Luckily I can't remember what a stanley is like, so I don't know how much better a plane can be :)

Pekka, you post motivated me to looking up "tuning up a  wood plane in Youtube". Thanks.