Author Topic: Flood coolant  (Read 4941 times)

Offline Doc

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Flood coolant
« on: January 19, 2014, 09:20:25 PM »
 I really need to put flood coolant on my lathe and manual mill. I have flood on my NC and keep wishing I had it on my other machines. I may make that a priority especially on the lathe.
George

Offline Brass_Machine

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Re: Flood coolant
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2014, 10:55:09 PM »
Hi George,

It is on my list as well. I need to come up with something for my converted mill. What do you have in mind?

Eric

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Offline Doc

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Re: Flood coolant
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2014, 05:42:29 PM »
I'm thinking of doing the same as I did on my CNC machine. I didn't want to use the tank in the base of the machine as they are some times hard to clean. So I put a rubber made tub that Walmart sell in a set of casters and pulled pump from machine and routed coolant to it. I've had it that way for a couple years now and have not had to change or clean tank. The nice thing about doing this is the way lube from the machine doesn't end up in the tank so the coolant stays much cleaner.
  I have a couple Little Giant bird bath pumps and I'm thinking of getting a couple more Rubber Maid tubes on the mill for the same reason as the CNC to help reduce the way lube in the coolant on the lathe just to keep them the same. If or I should say when I do it I'll post some pictures.
  I use TRIM coolant and I ordered 2, 1gal containers 2 years ago and have only used about 3/4 of one of them. I use it in squirt bottles also. We use that coolant at the shop where I work and I liked how it doesn't start smelling bad after being in use for awhile. The stuff in my CNC has been in the tank for about 2 years and still does not stink. I would recommend this coolant brand plus I have not had a problem with rust (you just need to make sure to mix it strong enough).
George

Offline Brass_Machine

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Re: Flood coolant
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2014, 08:44:25 PM »
Do you have pictures of your setup? How are you filtering the coolant?
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Offline Doc

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Re: Flood coolant
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2014, 08:16:59 PM »
The only filter is the screen I put in the coolant return line to keep chips from going into the tank. There isn't much to it. The coolant in the tank has been in use for 2 years it has a little way lube in it but not as much as it would have been if I were to use the tank in base of machine.

Just a tub with pump in it and return line to run coolant back into tank.



For 2 years this stuff looks pretty good.



George

Offline RodW

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Re: Flood coolant
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2014, 04:49:36 AM »
Funny to find this thread as I spent the afternoon revising my coolant system on my lathe. This is what I did previously.

To make a drain point, I drilled a hole and used a 1/2" bolt and pressed a dimple in the drill pan with two different sized sockets.






And welded on half a barbed hose joiner I found at an irrigation shop.



I used a commercial coolant tank that I got cheap but had not used the coolant nozzle that came with it.



And some stainless gauze from cheap kitchen utensil.


And a couple of taps so I can send coolant to my mill too. Shown here mounted to the lathe splash guard before it went back on.



And a magnetic nozzle.


Today's project was to mill up a fixed mount on the cross slide, sorry, no pics. The taps for the mill will move down to the pump end once this is all done and will make for a much neater install.

This project came about after I watched a Youtube video on how to mount a DRO and the lathe had a hole in the drip tray for the coolant line and it had a tube collar around it (sitting above the drip tray) so the coolant did not overflow. The coolant metal line just slid up and down happilly through this hole. I may add this yet but will see how it goes just falling out over the bcxk of the drip tray below the splash guard.


RodW
Brisbane, Australia

Offline Doc

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Re: Flood coolant
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2014, 04:54:54 PM »
Hey I like! I was wondering how I was going to go about doing the drain I think I have just seen the solution :bow:
Thanks  RodW

I would use the pump for both machines but the coolant on the lathe would end up dirtier faster due to the way lube going into the catch pan and on the mill the way lube ends up in the machine base tank and not the coolant tank so I'll keep them separate but I like the idea.
 Nice job  RodW and thanks for the info   :beer:
George

Offline Dawai

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Re: Flood coolant
« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2014, 06:52:35 PM »
Some things I learned,   "BUG" killer in the coolant, I was advised to use "blue stuff" like they use in toilets in RV's to kill the pond scum that grows in the tank. (FLOOD works best on machining aluminum to keep the swarf washed off, the swarf goes around and around marking up the clean machined finish.)

Warning, the some of the blue stuff has cyanide in it. Misting, and breathing over a period may make you ill.  Flu like symptoms.

I put a cool mist unit on it off a metal saw.. I found a mouse floating in my cool mist tank, (very nasty soup)    Cooling, THAT cool mist rig kicks butt.. air flow vacuums up the liquid up a tube and sprays air-mist onto the tool.  NOT as good as flood on aluminum thou.
 
I put a vacuum on the cnc after the books on the shelves started growing mold.. THIS time of year it is hard to heat that small machine shop, when you'd flip on the vacuum the heat would be gone in about six to ten seconds.

I'm still learning as I go.
I Hung a 24 foot Ibeam this morning in the ceiling by myself, programmed a Arduino this afternoon for a solar project, Helped a buddy out with a electrical motor connection issue on the phone, then cut up a chicken for Hotwings. I'd say it has been a "blessed day" for myself and all those around me.

Offline RodW

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Re: Flood coolant
« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2014, 06:14:00 AM »
Guys,  glad you liked my pics. The socket idea was not mine but it is a goodie!

I ave spent the last few days doing upgrades to my lathe as I fitted a DRO to it. While I was at it, I revisited the flood coolant and light.

Anyway, as promised, here is what I tidied up today.

The pipe riser, tap and nozzle came with the coolant kit which I fitted about 6 months ago. Pipe is 3/8"



the light is a cheap $14 LED reading light I got from Officeworks in Oz.

The cover on the back of the cross slide is just pressed metal. The light was easy to fit, it just needed a 10mm hole to mount it up after I removed the clamp that was fitted to the light.

Here is a closeup of the mounts (I need to get one more 8mm screw)  :loco:





I used black split conduit to protect the light wiring. I wish I could get conduit like the DRO cabes

the OD of the pipe riser is 17mm and I did not have a drill or endmill that size. The closest I had was an 11/16" one (17.4mm). I split the housing with two cuts of a slitting saw and left a 3mm slot. Placing it in a vice squashed it in enough to grip.

I had to add an elbow so the hose did not hit the splash guard when it was right to the rear.

And the plumbing for the mill down below



The lathe is right next to the door into my shed and the mill is on the other side of the door. I conned a plumber in the family to bend up some copper pipe. 1/2" for the delivery and 3/4". The idea is to run some flexible hose over to the 1/2" pipe and have the coolant return via gravity. I have some alluminium channel which will cover the pipes and act as a door lintel to keep water from flowing into my shed when it rains.

You may have noticed a couple of switches in the background



these go  to some leads at the back of the lathe



The DRO is always on and has no switch.



Finally, I have to say that I have had no problems with the coolant going off or mouldy and it is still in good condition after 6 months.

I just wish heating my shed was a problem! it was 44 degrees C here the other day  (111 deg F) and it hit 48 deg C (118 deg F) in the sun at 5:00pm in the arvo! Needless to say, I did not get much quality shed time!
RodW
Brisbane, Australia

Offline rotorhead

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Re: Flood coolant
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2014, 08:35:42 AM »
Hi Folks,

I like the variety on here, and the many ways of killing mice, gladly don't suffer from those though.

Wondered if you might like to see an alternative approach to flood cooling...

I use a Central Heating Circulation pump, just loosely placed in the motor housing on my Master, I welded an outlet into the integral coolant tank, and attached a valve.

The rest is pictorial really, the drain from the miller goes straight onto the Master tray...









I should also add that to relieve pump pressure I split the black rubber hose, aimed down into the fluid below..



It's not possible with my VFD setup to use both machines at the same time but the flood coolant doesn't know this.. :lol:

Chris
Ulceby, North Lincolnshire.