Author Topic: Close thing.  (Read 2840 times)

Offline DavidA

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Close thing.
« on: July 03, 2014, 05:08:42 AM »
So,  yesterday it finally happened.

I was doing some rough turning at work using the Elliott 40/400 lathe.  The chuck jaws were a bit stiff so I took them out,  cleaned them up,  lubricated the scroll and started to replace the jaws.

The chuck key was in place as I,  obviously,  needed to sequentially wind in the jaws.

I dropped one of the jaws.

Now,  they are not particularly heavy.  But heavy enough to knock down the clutch lever and start the machine in reverse.

Luckily the chuck key jammed against the bed after a fraction of a turn. A quick jab of the emergency button brought things to an end.

My colleagues pretended not to notice.

I have changed jaws many times. And never thought to do the obvious. I.e. switch off the power first.

However, no injury, no damage apart from a bent chuck key (16 MM bar) and a dented ego.

Maybe it is time I retired for good.

Dave. :doh:

Offline awemawson

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Re: Close thing.
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2014, 08:49:17 AM »
Glad that you survived the experience David.

I was always taught to consider the chuck key as part of your hand - if you remove your hand bring the key with you. Those chuck keys with springs to make sure they don't stay in unattended annoy me considerably in use, but I can see what the designer is trying to achieve !

Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline DavidA

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Re: Close thing.
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2014, 02:36:19 PM »
Andrew,

Point taken.  And when machining I always follow that system.
 It happened because I was part way through changing the jaws  and had just twiddled the chuck key around to get the scroll lined up to engage the jaw.  That's when I dropped the jaw.

There are so many ways of injuring yourself in a machine shop that it is a miracle that anyone ever finishes their career with both  their hands  intact.

Dave.

Offline dawesy

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Re: Close thing.
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2014, 05:09:41 PM »
wow close call.
its funny how we sometimes forget the things we know we shouldnt do. i was turning some aluminium the other week. the chips were the 'long stringy bastards' as john (doubleboost) would say. several times they got caught in the chuck so i stopped and removed them with pliers (lathe off) then as i stopped to clear some more i noticed one long one round the back of the chuck, it looked loose so without thinking i grabbed it with my hand to remove it, one 15mm long by 2mm deep cut to the index finger later i realised id done a silly thing :doh:
quick plaster job and i carried on, albeit using pliers to remove stringy chips.
just shows though how much you need to keep your wits about you though
Lee.
wishing my workshop was larger :(

Offline tom osselton

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Re: Close thing.
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2014, 06:18:45 PM »
When I get a cut I just put a  piece of cigarette paper on it,  it keeps it clean and dries like a second skin.

Offline Arbalist

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Re: Close thing.
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2014, 06:57:04 PM »
As convenient as it is, perhaps it shows a safety flaw in that particular Lathe. The M300's where I used to work had a similar arrangement. It would be impossible to start most hobby lathes by mistake by dropping something on them luckily!

Offline DavidA

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Re: Close thing.
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2014, 07:51:02 AM »
The Elliott has two clutch levers. One to the right of the saddle,  and one to the left.  The one to the left is directly in line with the chuck.  Hence the accident.

Our Colchester Triumph 2000 has the lever away to the right,  out of harms way. Also it is much firmer to operate than the Elliott.

Dave.