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How to's / Re: Grinding the jaws on my three jaw chuck
« Last post by mattinker on January 20, 2018, 10:32:36 PM »
Grinding the Jaws will not help if the Scroll is to badly worn. :clap:

Thank you, but I don't think any body said anything different! No miracles, just some improvement!
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How to's / Re: Grinding the jaws on my three jaw chuck
« Last post by Auskart on January 20, 2018, 06:49:11 PM »
Grinding the Jaws will not help if the Scroll is to badly worn. :clap:
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Neat Stuff / Flea market - always a joy - no matter what the weather is like
« Last post by eskoilola on January 20, 2018, 06:28:45 PM »
Today another visit to the Frankfurt flea market. The weather was rather cold so not too much crowd. Unfortunately the sellers also avoided the cold weather. Still I could find something in there. The flea market is there every saturday and this is really something I have not seen elsewhere. The street (Schaumankai) is packed with sellers about one and half kilometer (one mile) length. The items range from total crap to valuable art items. You can buy a on-site-refurbished bicycle or used shoes. Here and there one can buy kebab, bratwurst, mettbrötchen and also some italian specialities with a very decent price. A full blown kebab with apple juice and tea as desert will total about 7 euros and 50 cents. Lecker !

If You want to spend some time to download a bigger picture, the small pictures can be clicked to do just that.

It would be nice to see what kind of flea markets there are in Your region. I assume that there is a strong tradition on these in Britain and USA.
I have never owned a tap wrench. The one I found was totally rusted and locked up. However, I could take it apart with my very undecent equipment here in Frankfurt. After oiling with Ballistol the components went into the dish washer. Now the wrench looks really used and beaten but it works like new. Not bad for one euro.
Ballistol is very thin oil that does not make things greasy. I suspect that this oil might be used for guns. At least the name gives that sort of a suggestion. I found this bottle from Conrad.
The same man who sold me the tap wrench had a bunch of threading dies slipped in metal thread. He asked one euro for each die but I was able to bargain the price to a more reasonable figure - these are used and most of them are of some old style. In addition these were very grimy. Also these went into dish washer and when they came out a light application of ballistol made all the difference.
One of dies is looking really strange inside. There are only three spikes with varying width. It might be an acme die but I quess I have to try it out. It has no markings on it.
After some german national food (Döner Gebab) I came across a micrometer. It was totally jammed but as it looked otherwise good I thought that I could rescue it. It appeared that it had been lubricated with some really sticky oil which then engaged the lock when trying to turn it. Back in my apartment I took it apart, cleaned really well, oiled with ballistol and now it turns freely and the locking works as it should. I know for fact that this thing is not made from chinesium and for a price of 7 euros I think it was a bargain. All I now need to do is to calibrate it when I'm back in finland.
Just when I was about to leave for Bauermarkt I stumbled into a lady ... errr ... not the lady but the stuff she was selling. Among all the used watches and whatnot there was two items that catched my eye. The first item was a grinding stone which is brand new - straight from the sixties I assume. The other was a set of character punches. Also these were unused. Both are german made and especially the character punches seem to be of a really good quality. These were the most expensive items for today. Good quality and probably worth the 10 euros.


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Tools / Should I try to repair this dial caliper?
« Last post by sparky961 on January 20, 2018, 06:09:38 PM »
I picked this out of the garbage recently, and I'm beginning to see why it was there originally.  I thought I might put it across to the intelligent folks here though, as there may still be a way to put it back into service.

The patient is similar to what you'd find here: https://www.amazon.com/001-Graduations-STM-Dial-Caliper/dp/B002D2R3D0

(12" Dial Caliper with 0.001" graduations)

The problem is that the hand is left floating around inside the bezel, and upon closer inspection the tiny centre pinion is broken.  See the attached image of a similar design, where item #17 is the centre pinion.

Now, I'm not a watch maker.  I can work small, but this is perhaps beyond me.  Should I return it to whence it came?
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How to's / Re: Grinding the jaws on my three jaw chuck
« Last post by vtsteam on January 20, 2018, 06:09:18 PM »
Glad that worked out for you Matt.  :beer:

Since this is a How To and others may be learning, I just wanted to point out a few additional things I think about when I do this operation.

I want to take as absolutely little off of the jaws as I can, because it increases the minimum diameter you can grip with the chuck. I'm mainly interested in removing a small amount of run out by this operation, Nothing more.

It can't correct for an unevenly worn scroll, except for workpieces of the same diameter that the jaws were ground at. Different diameters will again show run out on a worn chuck.

I've had good luck using centrifugal force to keep the jaws out against the scroll, rather than gripping a set of spacers or rings. I just run the chuck at a reasonable speed and it seems to work, for me. Jaws have mass and they do want to move outward on the chuck

My process: I take VERY little meat off at a time, I just feed the stone outward a tiny amount until I just see a few sparks -- not a shower. I make passes completely through the jaw bore and I wait until all sparks stop, and then I stop the lathe and look at the jaws to see which ones are hitting. If all three hit over a reasonable length, I'm done. If not I'll take a tiny additional amount off. Generally the last pass my produce only an occasional spark, until they stop altogether.

I don't try to get a perfect clean face. This takes the minimum off needed to achieve the least run out possible with this method. Just personal preference -- and I don't have really rough chucks to deal with.



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Our Shop / Re: Small Shops and Tiny Toolboxes
« Last post by sparky961 on January 20, 2018, 05:58:11 PM »
Indeed.  The endless chain of tool making is to be avoided in the professional setting, but as a hobby it's the journey that matters much more than the destination.
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Project Logs / Re: Grinder Attachment for Trueing up the 3 Jaw chuck
« Last post by vtsteam on January 20, 2018, 05:36:48 PM »
Photos restored after Photobucket broke links.
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Our Shop / Re: Small Shops and Tiny Toolboxes
« Last post by gerritv on January 20, 2018, 03:45:12 PM »
None of it, it would cease to be capable of the work I wish to do and thus become pointless.

As much as I love technology and gadgets, I can't help but feel a craftsperson who creates marvelous works with a minimum of tools is far ahead of one augmented with a fully appointed shop.
I agree. From my experience it helps in limiting the amount of time you spend chosing a tool. It does however require more creativity in fixturing and such :-) But that is where I think a lot of the pleasures come from. E.g. I often have to make a tool to make a tool to make a part. The tools then become part of the accomplishment.

Gerrit
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Our Shop / Re: Small Shops and Tiny Toolboxes
« Last post by sparky961 on January 20, 2018, 03:21:50 PM »
None of it, it would cease to be capable of the work I wish to do and thus become pointless.

As much as I love technology and gadgets, I can't help but feel a craftsperson who creates marvelous works with a minimum of tools is far ahead of one augmented with a fully appointed shop.
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How to's / Re: Grinding the jaws on my three jaw chuck
« Last post by mattinker on January 20, 2018, 03:04:28 PM »
Thanks Kev!
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