Author Topic: Scaleing Plans  (Read 4023 times)

Offline Sackett

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Scaleing Plans
« on: May 02, 2016, 08:42:35 PM »
This might not be right place for this,, if not ok for mods to move it pls. So if I wanted to scale a set of plans up, say double,,,do I double all dimendions? Was thinking about one of Elmers ,,maybe #3 mill

Offline bp

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Re: Scaleing Plans
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2016, 11:21:47 PM »
Yep.
Distance dimensions are multiplied by the scaling factor (2 in your case).  angular dimensions stay the same, i.e a 45 degree chamfer at original scale is still a 45 degree chamfer at twice scale.  If the chamfer is shown on the drawing as "  chamfer 45 degrees x 1.0mm  " becomes " chamfer 45 degrees x 2.0mm", and so on forever!!
cheers
Bill

Offline SwarfnStuff

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Re: Scaleing Plans
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2016, 01:42:32 AM »
        For what it's worth.  If you can draw it up in CAD at actual size there is usually an option to scale the drawing up or down. This changes the dimensions as well too, so can make life easier. Of course you have to have a CAD program and draw it up first.
        Although, some things may not need to be scaled up in the case of model engines IF you are not being pedantic.

John B
Converting good metal into swarf sometimes ending up with something useful. ;-)

Offline Sackett

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Re: Scaleing Plans
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2016, 10:39:36 PM »
Tks guys,,no cad here,,,just carpenters pencil n sorta straight ruler,,,,,sigh

Offline Toolshed

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Re: Scaleing Plans
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2016, 03:13:23 PM »
http://www.staples.com/Staedtler-Mars-12-inch-Architects-Triangular-Scale/product_274746

I have never been without one (Ok, more like  a half dozen) since I took drafting in High School.
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Offline Sackett

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Re: Scaleing Plans
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2016, 09:43:22 AM »
I've picked up a few bits,,, scale as Toolshed showed, some triangles ,,n some hard penciles, n t square. My plan is to print two sets of plans. White out dimensions on one, then take the original dimension off other, upscale it, n transfer to whited drawing, which will become new working plan. Is this a viable plan,, or is this likely to go horribly wrong

Offline Pete W.

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Re: Scaleing Plans
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2016, 03:55:50 PM »
Hi there, Sackett,

Your proposed plan sounds good to me.

My late wife worked as a tracer in an engineering drawing office and later as an instructress in the use of plastic drafting film and she taught me some of the techniques.  In those 'old days' of 'blueprints' and diazo printing, you could get drafting film with a diazo sensitive coating on the back and a pencil or ink coating on the front.  (The raw polyester sheet wouldn't take ink or pencil very well - so sheets were available with various types of coating.)
One method of producing a variant drawing was to take copy of the original drawing on that type of film.  Then you got busy with your scalpel or razor blade and scraped off the unwanted parts of the drawing from the back of the sheet.  Then you drew the required new details on the front of the sheet, marrying up with the parts of the drawing that didn't need to change (using pencil or ink according to local practice).

What you're proposing is essentially the same procedure but adapted to hobbyist scale use of ink-jet or bubble-jet produced prints.  I suggest you use pencil until you've checked your scaled dimensions.
If you find a way of liquefying aged Tippex please report back here!   :lol:   :lol:   :lol: 
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Offline Toolshed

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Re: Scaleing Plans
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2016, 05:09:30 PM »
Your method of DimensionX times 2 should work fine.  Can we get a picture of what you're scaling? 

A double check of your scaling should be done to check all your dimensions by REDRAWING the piece at the new dimensions.  That 'should' eliminate errors if they exist.
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Offline NormanV

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Re: Scaleing Plans
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2016, 05:16:12 PM »
It all depends on what you plan to make. If you are building a model (engine, car, boat, aeroplane etc.) It will look very chunky as the bolt sizes and material thicknesses will be out of proportion.

Offline Sackett

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Re: Scaleing Plans
« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2016, 07:38:35 PM »
What I have in mind is some of Elmers engines, specificaly the #3 mill engine , and the mine engine. If all,or "most" goes well,I'de like to build a complete set of Elmer's, as drawn, n 2x. A long range plan,, but a plan none the less.