Author Topic: Rebirth of a 6 Foot Flail Mower  (Read 32512 times)

Offline awemawson

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Re: Rebirth of a 6 Foot Flail Mower
« Reply #125 on: June 10, 2018, 08:02:24 AM »
Interestingly, the parts drawing that I have illustrates quite a different form of flail.

Mine are rather like a  comma curled around their mounting bolt, whereas these ones swing on a bent rod link. I don't suppose that the grass minds which form clouts it on the head at a great rate of knots  :lol:

Carlquib, do you have any references you can cite to the sucking nature of the curl?

The only similar replacement flail to mine that I can find illustrated on the web has a very similar amount of curl to mine
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline carlquib

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Re: Rebirth of a 6 Foot Flail Mower
« Reply #126 on: June 10, 2018, 08:15:13 AM »
We use several different types of these flails. They are used for mowing, same as yours, but also to defoliate sugar beets before we dig them. The sucking reference comes from there. My parma topper whirls them around at 2500 rpm. You can watch it pull the material up off the ground so it does a better job shredding it. I've had the other style of j knife as well and they just don't do as good a job. They don't generate the lift on the material. I'm sure glad mine aren't $15, I believe the last batch I picked up was about $7.00, which I though was plenty.

My name is Brian and I'm a toolaholic.


Offline awemawson

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Re: Rebirth of a 6 Foot Flail Mower
« Reply #127 on: June 10, 2018, 09:37:59 AM »
... mm $7 - that's about 5 which is far more reasonable, though as Norman says not too complex to make given a forge and a suitable jig.

I wonder what steel they are - something fairly tough I expect  :scratch:
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline carlquib

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Re: Rebirth of a 6 Foot Flail Mower
« Reply #128 on: June 10, 2018, 09:57:53 AM »
The flails we get are made from a 1095 spring steel.

My name is Brian and I'm a toolaholic.


Offline Jo

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Re: Rebirth of a 6 Foot Flail Mower
« Reply #129 on: June 10, 2018, 12:37:51 PM »
Sounds like the idea use for old car suspension leaf springs   

Jo
So many engines to build and yet so little time.

Offline NormanV

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Re: Rebirth of a 6 Foot Flail Mower
« Reply #130 on: June 10, 2018, 12:50:48 PM »
Five years ago I bought a new blade for my rotary mower, it cut really well. I have just looked at it for the first time since then. It looks totally wrecked, but, I cannot detect any difference in its cutting abilities. Grass is not so tough!

Offline wgw

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Re: Rebirth of a 6 Foot Flail Mower
« Reply #131 on: June 10, 2018, 01:30:17 PM »
In an earlier life I designed mowers and etc. We did some experiments on grass cutting, as expected the main thing was speed of the rotor tip, with correct speed could cut grass with just about anything. A few lengths of chain worked just as well as a sharp blade. Of course it depends what the cut grass is to be used for.  BTW grass is tough stuff, try getting it in a bearing.



Offline awemawson

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Re: Rebirth of a 6 Foot Flail Mower
« Reply #132 on: June 10, 2018, 01:46:45 PM »
I have one area of pasture that is rather infested with rushes, both 'clump rushes' and 'creeping rushes'.

Regular cutting is about the only way to keep them under control, but it is very noticeable that the tractor (Ford 4000 1974) labours far more on the rushes than the grass, also you can tell from the smell which you are cutting !

Having sharpened the blades I did the entire 10 acres in high range 1st gear this morning before breakfast, whereas the last cut pre-sharpening was low range 4th until in the rushes, when I had to drop to low range 3rd, and low second on occasions.

Really the field needs proper drainage installed then it's acidity regulated to get rid of the rushes, but it makes no economic sense for sheep grazing.

(Where the rushes are is very peaty - originally a stream bed then silted up about 100 years ago)
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline wgw

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Re: Rebirth of a 6 Foot Flail Mower
« Reply #133 on: June 11, 2018, 06:33:03 AM »
The rushes can create their own bog, the roots attract water by capillary action. I,ve got some in a small field, and it's high, started getting boggy after 3 years. My fault, didn't bother cutting the few bits there was after a year with no grazing and it just spread. Sheep might help, spraying works.

Offline awemawson

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Re: Rebirth of a 6 Foot Flail Mower
« Reply #134 on: June 11, 2018, 06:53:43 AM »
Heavy cutting, then when the new shoots emerge hit them with a 'weed wiper' charged with glyphosate is the received wisdom - be good if I had a weed wiper  :scratch:

The idea being the the roll of the wiper only touches the rush shoots and not the surrounding grass. A drop of washing up liquid in the glyphosate helps break down the waxy surface of the rush.

I have had some success on 'clumping rushes' with a backpack sprayer but it's hard going covering a large area. Whenever I need a bonfire it is always placed on the most dense patch of rush that I can find - they don't like that at all  :lol:
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex