Author Topic: Moving a Bridgeport into the Basement  (Read 29424 times)

Offline Bernd

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Re: Moving a Bridgeport into the Basement
« Reply #25 on: November 23, 2008, 07:59:40 PM »
You can stop sweating now Bernd, the hard bit has been done, and if I must say so, very professionally as well.

Thank you Bog's. Coming from you that means a lot to me.

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Did you ever get the bent knee shaft sorted?

Yes, I think I have it under control. If you go back to the second from the last pic, you'll notice I've got a pair of vise grips clamped to the shaft. I have milled a 3/16" wide slot for a key. I'm going to make another part to put a wrench (spanner) on to rasie and lower the knee. I'll post with pics as I work on this.

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It must be wonderful to have the room you have, there is real space envy showing coming on here. By the time I get everything into my shop, if I put something in my pocket, I will have difficulty moving about (that might also be because of my size).

John

Only one minor problem with so much room Bog's. You just collect more junk that you just can't get yourself to throw out, because you just might need it one of these days. It also makes you less orginized because you can just toss it down somewhere. Haveing less room forces you to orginize your tools.

Bernd
You can't fix "STUPID".

Offline Bernd

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Re: Moving a Bridgeport into the Basement
« Reply #26 on: November 23, 2008, 08:14:24 PM »
Nice job Bernd.  :bow:

Thank very much.

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Outside of the drillpress and mill have you ever done a move like that before? Lots of planning and ingenuity went into that. Very well done.

Eric

 :mmr:

No. These are my first tries at moving such heavy machinery. I learn by obsevering and reading. Basically were I worked we built gear cutting machines. They are quite large, some weighing in at several tons. Plus the machines that are used to build the machines were occasionally moved also, mills, lathes, grinders and such. I watched how the mill rights moved these machines. Once I saw how it was done I had no problem trying it myself. I'm not afraid of trying something. I do know the dangers involved with heavy equipment moving. It's basically common sense. I also found a web site were a guy moved a block of concrete weighing 24,000 lbs. by himself. It's nothing more than physics and geometry, neither of which I studied in school by the way. I would have tried even if I won't have had the tractor. I would have used an engine hoist. If there is a will there is usally a way. Also what helped was the fact that when I designed the house it was to have a straight shot from outside to the basement. So I had this planned from over 10 years. The only thing I was a bit nervous about was if I could get the ram back up on top of the base. That was quite easy to do. I would have taken the darn thing apart and assembled piece by piece if I would have had to.

and for my next trick......................... :wave:

bernd
You can't fix "STUPID".

Offline Bernd

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Re: Moving a Bridgeport into the Basement
« Reply #27 on: November 23, 2008, 08:24:35 PM »
Normally I'd have thought that was too big a job for one man.

Bernd, you have shown us otherwise along with some very handy ways to tackle each step.

Well done  :clap:

Thank you Darren.

Remember it's nothing more than levers ,ramps and a couple of rollers. Gravity also helps in making things go down hill, hence, siding evrything down the stairs. I used rollers to move the machine and levers to lift it up on the rollers. Ofcourse I had a good ground to roll them on and the help of hydraulics in the form of a tractor bucket was great help to. The biggest help was the grey matter between the ears. So what if it took me several weeks to accomplish what would have taken proffesional movers a day or so to do. Think of all the money I saved and I learned. I now feel I can give a save view point of how to move such a machine.

I believe anybody here could have done the same.

Bernd
You can't fix "STUPID".

Offline Nightshift

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Re: Moving a Bridgeport into the Basement
« Reply #28 on: June 24, 2009, 08:03:46 PM »
Bernd, great job on documenting this move to the basement. As I mentioned to you, I have to do the same thing with my '83 Bridgeport. It's been sitting in my garage for the past 6 months as I figure out how to safely move mine down into my basement shop. I'm actually thinking the easiest (and safest) way for me to do this myself is to remove the stair treads and risers to open up the stairwell (the stringers are lagged to the concrete walls of my stairwell) and then using my chainfall, lower each piece straight down and set it on a low 4-wheeled cart on the bottom. From there it will be easy to rolling thru the door into the basement as you did. When I'm all done, I can then just screw the stair treads and risers back on. Here's my mill before I start disassembly and the stairway it's going down. Bill


Offline Nightshift

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Re: Moving a Bridgeport into the Basement
« Reply #29 on: June 24, 2009, 08:09:38 PM »
Here's the mill

Offline Bernd

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Re: Moving a Bridgeport into the Basement
« Reply #30 on: June 24, 2009, 08:28:58 PM »
Bill,

Best way to move something of this size and weight by yourself, is take it a part. You'll learn a little about how it's put together. Still some of those parts are big and can hurt if they fall on you, so becareful and good luck.

Looks like you have a shorter stair case to go down than I did.

BTW, the I think the heaviest part is the base/column of the machine, next the ram and then the table.

Regards,
Bernd
You can't fix "STUPID".

Offline Nightshift

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Re: Moving a Bridgeport into the Basement
« Reply #31 on: June 24, 2009, 09:24:18 PM »
Bill,

Best way to move something of this size and weight by yourself, is take it a part. You'll learn a little about how it's put together. Still some of those parts are big and can hurt if they fall on you, so becareful and good luck.

Looks like you have a shorter stair case to go down than I did.

BTW, the I think the heaviest part is the base/column of the machine, next the ram and then the table. Regards, Bernd
Yes, I agree with you. The heaviest piece is definately the bare base. Here are the actual weights for a Series 1, 2HP, 48" table unit if your (or others) are interested ...

Base - 715#
Knee - 257#
Table - 365#
Saddle - 142#
Head - 200#
Ram - 218#
Ram adapter - 90#
Turret - 214#
 
Total - 2,201#

I have another question Bernd ... with newer BPs like ours, we don't have the access door on the left side of the base. When you pulled the 4 bolts holding the ram to the base, does the spider nut inside stay put or fall down inside the column? I don't want to let it drop and break if I can avoid it. Also, how did you hold the spider nut in place while you put the ram assembly on? I'm assuming the spider nut must sit on cast dogs under the opening to make this possible? Bill    

Offline Bernd

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Re: Moving a Bridgeport into the Basement
« Reply #32 on: June 25, 2009, 08:34:26 AM »
Bill,

When I took mine apart I had no idea what was inside untill I got the ram off. Once I got the bolts out I pulled the ram straight up. Once I looked inside I saw the spider nut. It sits on a very narrow ledge that keeps it from dropping. As long as you don't go fishing around with the bolt when you put it back together you shouldn't have any problem. Just make sure when you put the ram back on that the rams holes lines up somewhat with the spider's 4 threaded holes and you shouldn't have any problems.

Bernd
You can't fix "STUPID".

Offline Nightshift

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Re: Moving a Bridgeport into the Basement
« Reply #33 on: June 25, 2009, 01:44:39 PM »
Bill,

When I took mine apart I had no idea what was inside untill I got the ram off. Once I got the bolts out I pulled the ram straight up. Once I looked inside I saw the spider nut. It sits on a very narrow ledge that keeps it from dropping. As long as you don't go fishing around with the bolt when you put it back together you shouldn't have any problem. Just make sure when you put the ram back on that the rams holes lines up somewhat with the spider's 4 threaded holes and you shouldn't have any problems.

Bernd

Ok, thanks Bernd ... that's good to know. I expected something like this, but it helps to have you confirm it. I was initially planning to remove 3 bolts, then drop a string down a hole, out the bottom of the (elevated) base, tie a nut to it and pull it up to the spider nut before removing the last bolt just to make sure it didn't drop. I still might do this for insurance.

Offline Bernd

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Re: Moving a Bridgeport into the Basement
« Reply #34 on: June 25, 2009, 06:06:43 PM »
Good idea Bill. I did drop mine a couple of times. Didn't harm it but I thought, Oh boy if I break that I'm in deep do-do.
Problem is when you put the ram back on and don't get that first bolt in right or the spider moves you have to take the ram off and start over.

Ask me how I know this.  :)

Bernd
You can't fix "STUPID".

Offline Nightshift

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Re: Moving a Bridgeport into the Basement
« Reply #35 on: June 25, 2009, 10:02:29 PM »
Ask me how I know this.  :)Bernd

I believe ya Bernd :)

Would this work? Before lifting the ram and setting in place on the column, what if I were to take four 6" lengths of threaded rod and insert them in the spider nut. Then lift and set the ram down on these rods, and once it's fully lowered, it would be easy to unscrew them one at a time and replace with the lock down bolts? Bill

Offline Bernd

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Re: Moving a Bridgeport into the Basement
« Reply #36 on: June 26, 2009, 09:25:45 AM »
Bill,

I had thought of doing that to, but came to the conclusion that if I were to hit one of the studs it would knock the spider out of align. Since I didn't have long enough studs, for one reason is I have a 4" riser block in between ram and column, I didn't try it. Just line the spider up as best you can and when you set the ram back down just look through one of the bolt holes to line up as best you can and then carefuly place a bolt in the hole.

It could work to your advantage though using the 6" long rods. I'd say give it a try. If it works then people reading this thread can decide what will work for them.

One thing you might also do to help balance the ram better is turn the motor 180 degrees so it hangs down. Like I did when I put the ram back on. Makes handling the whole assembly much easier.

Bernd
You can't fix "STUPID".

Offline Nightshift

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Re: Moving a Bridgeport into the Basement
« Reply #37 on: June 26, 2009, 09:54:38 AM »
Yes, I saw that you had the head turned down ... I'll do that also. Thanks for the tip. Bill

Offline kvom

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Re: Moving a Bridgeport into the Basement
« Reply #38 on: June 26, 2009, 01:33:03 PM »
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Just line the spider up as best you can and when you set the ram back down just look through one of the bolt holes to line up as best you can and then carefuly place a bolt in the hole.
worked for me.