Author Topic: Damp proofing  (Read 884 times)

Online John Rudd

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2207
  • Country: gb
Damp proofing
« on: March 21, 2018, 05:16:01 PM »
So my new garage is a bit of a diappointment at the new house!

Its as wet inside as it is outside....the bricks are very permeable...

So what is the best way of making the inside more conducive for machinery and working in?

I'm thinking some Thompsons waterproofing for the brickwork externally and then adding a dpm on the inside,adding some studding and then timber sheeting to line the inside with an insulating foam infill between the studs....

Any alternative/better ideas?
eccentric millionaire financed by 'er indoors
Location:  Backworth Newcastle

Skype: chippiejnr

Offline Ben

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 13
  • Country: gb
Re: Damp proofing
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2018, 05:43:06 PM »
Quote
bricks are very permeable
Replace the bottom two rows with engineering bricks, check the all the guttering and down pipes ect

Offline velocette

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 136
  • Country: nz
Re: Damp proofing
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2018, 11:10:20 PM »
Hi John
Disappointed I certainly would be sorry if I ramble on a bit with more questions than answers
Has the floor slab been laid on an impermeable  plastic sheet and a "Damp Course" in the outside walls. Acrylic  Paint on the outside will keep the wet out.
An air gap between the proposed studding will help if open at the top as dry air is heavier that wet air. What are ground conditions like around the foundations do they require added drainage.

Eric

Offline chipenter

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 759
  • Country: gb
Re: Damp proofing
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2018, 02:27:03 AM »
I would also put some drains in the perps they will also let some air in , they are easyer to fit tham air bricks .
Jeff

Online John Rudd

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2207
  • Country: gb
Re: Damp proofing
« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2018, 03:34:51 AM »
Perhaps I ought to have given a bit more detail....

This is a brand new house built on a green field site.

All construction conforms to local building regs/NHBC  standards.

The dampness I refer to is occurent when it rains. So can be directional. Ie all walls do not become saturated at the same time.
I dont hink its a drainage issue. Just the fact that the type of brick used is very porous. Obviously the house bricks are the same but the dampness is nanaged within the construction of the cavity walls.

The garage floor is of slab construction with a dpm.
eccentric millionaire financed by 'er indoors
Location:  Backworth Newcastle

Skype: chippiejnr

Offline chipenter

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 759
  • Country: gb
Re: Damp proofing
« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2018, 05:08:30 AM »
One thing at a time then waterproof first , iff and when you fit studs put dpm under the sole plate as  belt and braces .
Jeff

Offline Joules

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 919
  • Country: gb
Re: Damp proofing
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2018, 05:23:44 AM »
John, that slab will take a year or two more to dry out.  Had the same issue when the workshop was built.  Knew the floor wasnít dry the first year as floor paint flaked up.  Now the floor is very dry and paint stays put.  Run a dehumdifier for a couple of years and keep working bulbs in the machines.  The bulbs just keep the machines above ambient temperature.  That helps keep the damp off them, if you can heat the workshop, all the better.

Even though the inside might appear dry and dusty, itís all saturated below the surface and this needs to be driven, allowed to come out.   If we have a hot summer, get as much warm air blowing through the workshop as you can.  I used to have the roller door up and side door open to get the heat and air moving through the shop, well for the few minutes the weather was good  :lol:
Just get doing and make swarf, you can decide what its going to be later.   :thumbup:

Offline Joules

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 919
  • Country: gb
Re: Damp proofing
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2018, 07:43:52 AM »
I just visited the pictures of your old TIDY shop... :thumbup:

Take some of those foam models and a heat gun, smear models on wall, hey presto, walls insulated.

      :lol:
Just get doing and make swarf, you can decide what its going to be later.   :thumbup:

Online John Rudd

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2207
  • Country: gb
Re: Damp proofing
« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2018, 10:12:18 AM »
I just visited the pictures of your old TIDY shop... :thumbup:

Take some of those foam models and a heat gun, smear models on wall, hey presto, walls insulated.

      :lol:

You cad!....what a suggestion, how could you?.....lol..l :lol: :lol:

Getting air to move is a great idea, but the up n over door has an adjacent side door....dont think  I'll get much moving....door is at the wrong end.. :Doh:

My first action is to paint the external faces of the walls when the weather becomes warmer....

As its really cold in there ( this is my first winter here..) I'm looking to insulate and use supplementary heating....thinking waste oil or log burner...

Overall, the garage is a lot smaller than the previous one, so I'm looking it extend it too....

Certainly got my work cut out...
eccentric millionaire financed by 'er indoors
Location:  Backworth Newcastle

Skype: chippiejnr

Offline beeshed

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 13
Re: Damp proofing
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2018, 04:59:32 PM »

All construction conforms to local building regs/NHBC  standards.

Designed to  or built to?
Bricks intended for outside walls are different to ones for inside construction so they could easily have used the wrong ones. You should have a ten year NHBC guarantee but the builders may well have done a runner in two so get in asap. Internal bricks absorbing water will decompose in the frost.
You may be able to put a lean to greenhouse on one side and a log store on another then a carport (which does not have to be anywhere near the drive) on another.

Online John Rudd

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2207
  • Country: gb
Re: Damp proofing
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2018, 02:07:10 AM »
No corners have been cut.....the house is made from the same brick....

Cant do a car port, both sides are bounded by gardens, mine and next doors....the back end, well I'm erecting a shed, 3 x3 metres...should keep the rain off there... :coffee:
eccentric millionaire financed by 'er indoors
Location:  Backworth Newcastle

Skype: chippiejnr

Offline hermetic

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 274
Re: Damp proofing
« Reply #11 on: March 31, 2018, 03:53:05 PM »
NHBC (LOL) or no, a brick which allows moisture through a wall is not fit for purpose, and I would go the warranty route immediately. As for a cure, you could put laths and a tyvec type breathable membrane on the outside, and hang rosemary or larger type tiles on it, to stop the weather getting to the bricks, you could also lath the inside with25 x50 @600 centres, then put 50mm jablite between then visqueen and finish with ply or stirling board. A single brick garage will be freezing cold in winter! I have just finished doing my workshop like this. The only problem with doing this inside, is that the visqueen need to be continuous with the visqueen under the floor slab, or at least drain into the underfloor beneath the slab in order that the damp be sealed out completely. Use tanalised lath.By far the best cure is to seal from the outside. Cheapest immediate solution is some brick waterproofing silicon spray from screwfix, done when the bricks are bone dry, and see if that works. I would be down the solicitors by now!There are basic building regulations concerning the suitability of materials, and one of those is that the outer layer of bricks must be impervious to moisture, and the building regulations are statute law after all!

Offline RussellT

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 404
  • Country: gb
Re: Damp proofing
« Reply #12 on: April 02, 2018, 05:54:04 AM »
one of those is that the outer layer of bricks must be impervious to moisture

That doesn't stop the wall letting water through.  In practice the vertical joints are seldom tight and in some walls you can see daylight.  It is worth remembering that cavity walls were introduced to stop rain penetration rather than for insulation.

Russell

Offline howsitwork?

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 287
  • Country: england
Re: Damp proofing
« Reply #13 on: April 02, 2018, 09:05:49 AM »
Having a cavity built workshop I too can vouch that it needs time after construction to dry out. A dehumidifier running inside helps greatly. Once itís drier outside waterproof by all means but as others have said get the machinery above ambient to stop rust!
I put a 6ft oil filled radiator on a thermostat in mine set to 12c just keeps everything ok. But this was after the dehumidifier had pulled a few gallons out. Kept the distilled water produced for other things, quite useful all round.

Before doing all the insulating get the electrician to instal a suitable sized distribution board in it. Then the sockets can go where needed with no hassle to SWMBO. I learned that at the last house we had built.

Have fun

Ian

Offline hermetic

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 274
Re: Damp proofing
« Reply #14 on: April 02, 2018, 12:25:17 PM »
If you can see daylight through a newly built wall, then the brickie needs sacking. Yes, the idea of cavity walls was to stop damp penetration, but my brothers factory, an old chapel, was built around 1878, has cavity walls, and impervious bricks. a new build wall that lets water through to this extent is not fit for purpose, no two ways about it! NHBC, on certain sites (not all by any means), have set new standards in piss-poor building. I was at one recently where we had to chop in plaster depth boxes, because a wall built across to divide two rooms had been started from either end, without a line, and the plasterers were putting 50mm on one side of a doorway, and a skim  on the other to try to create a flat wall, another occasion, on the same site, the NHBC inspector had pointed out to the builder that the hip board on a newly tiled garage roof, finished in mid air, and the roof was already sagging! As an electrical engineer, I have worked in alliance with the building trade for much of my working life, and also done a huge amount of brickwork myself, and also built a five bed house, from footings (put down on the hottest day of the last century!) to ridge tiles. walls may get damp over time, but walls that let water through, or bricks that absorb water to that extent are not fit for purpose, but probably very cheap!! I have explained how to cure the problem in my earlier post, but generally we have to stop accepting poor quality work and poor materials as being acceptable, they are not, and we should shout it from the rooftops!