Author Topic: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?  (Read 1595 times)

Offline wgw

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #25 on: May 06, 2018, 04:49:32 AM »
Lanolin is very good for cracked skin. Here in GB mine comes from Australia, used to buy it in a cardboard box very cheap but its expensive now for rustproofing. Don't forget that anthrax is called "wool sorters desease".

Offline Pete W.

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #26 on: May 06, 2018, 07:23:17 AM »
Steve, pure lanolin has been used for years to fight rust and as a water proofer. After all the sheep are out in all weathers and (usually) survive !

Bradford in Yorkshire was a major centre for Woollen cloth production from the beginning of the industrial revolution. Lots of lanolin was released by the processing, and was commercially extracted from the sewer water !

Somehow in this Ecco conscious age I doubt it still happens.

At one stage in my youth I did a bit of cave exploration.  The ladders we used had tubular rungs of Elektron tube attached to stranded steel 'stiles'.  The recommended maintenance treatment after use was to apply a solution of lanolin.  I don't remember what solvent was used, it might have been 'trike' or carbon tetrachloride!

Am I right in thinking 'Elektron' is an alloy of aluminium and magnesium?

The 'with it' method of climbing the ladder was to insert one foot in one side of the ladder and the next foot in the other side, quite tricky when you're trying to keep the jet from your acetylene helmet lamp from melting the nylon or Terylene safety rope!

I was eventually persuaded that SCUBA diving was a preferable way to get my exercise but the techniques of getting my far from slim body through small gaps still come in handy when I have to park the car close to another car or to a wall.   
Best regards,

Pete W.

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Offline vtsteam

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #27 on: May 06, 2018, 12:42:07 PM »
Andrew, I knew you had the source right to hand. Why not build a CNC sheep squeezer to extract the stuff?

I assume it's the same process they must use to produce baby oil?  :hammer: :thumbup:
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Steve
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Online awemawson

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #28 on: May 06, 2018, 01:44:33 PM »
Well Steve, as it happens I HAVE just been squeezing a sheep, but for milk not lanolin ! Twins born a couple of weeks ago, both apparently thriving initially but last week one wouldn't feed from mum and going down hill rapidly. Vet reckoned Vitamin B1 deficiency (but why only one lamb  :scratch:) So a course of injections and we've been stomach feeding it with a tube. It's got to the stage now that it'll suck from a bottle but not from mum.

So earlier I had her on the ground on her back, titties upwards, held there firmly by my legs each side of her neck, and plonked lamb on the nipple. Lamb did take milk and mothers milk is far better for it than the substitute stuff. I reckon this lamb can't see very well - it has issues and may well not survive.

Hope this doesn't carry on too long - that Ewe is a Jacobs with sharp horns
Andrew Mawson
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Offline ddmckee54

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #29 on: May 07, 2018, 05:02:02 PM »
I'd have to do some digging to find out for sure, but I think the mixture that blacksmiths wipe onto hand forged objects to protect them from rust is equal parts of beeswax, turpentine and linseed oil.

Just out of idle curiosity, how much beeswax were you able to get dissolved in the turpentine?

Don
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Online awemawson

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #30 on: May 07, 2018, 05:11:22 PM »
Don, I only went as far a 25 grams in 500 millilitres

I'm quite sure I could have dissolved more given time and more warming, but I only wanted to lay a very  thin layer on the machines.

Beeswax, boiled linseed oil and Turpentine mixed 1:1:1 are the components of traditional furniture cream which in that ratio forms a paste.
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline PekkaNF

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #31 on: May 08, 2018, 02:27:31 AM »
Pure beeswax looks pretty on fourniture and can be buffed to luster repeatedly, the turpentine (or other solvent) is there to help spreading, but it spread without it on just a slightly warmer than room temperature. Pure beeswax softens at body temperature and if it used to finish chairs, your pants will absorbe wax while you widget in family function. Linseed oil (especially boiled linseed oil) will oxidize, harden and stabilize. Good news on fourniture finish, bad thing on metal objects if you ever need to move anything appart. It makes pretty good glue most of the times if it seeps in close fitting surfaces.

Pretty much all vegetable oils will "harden" given enough time. Been reading of Camelia oil being used traditonally for japanese hand tools to prevent rusting....
https://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/Camellia-Oil-Spray-Rust-Protection-P407.aspx
Bought a little bottle of different brand. Really can't tell if it any better or worse of any other vegetable oil or wax. Scent is milder and it hardens slower than most oils, including raw linseed oil IMHO.

Main thing is to buy "raw" not cooked linseed oil, if you dont't want it to set. Cooked linseed oil is basically a warnishs. How I did found out? Long time ago I read how great linseed oil is, renovated bedroom, put very nice wall papers and made all mouldings from plank up. They looked very nice, "painted" them with raw linseed oil and dried them with a rag. Really nice, smooth lustre. Few days later I fitted them in place and admired my handiwork. Few months later I noticed that on many places the linseed oil started to seep into light blue wall paper. Yellowish blobs don't go well with light ble floral patterns. That prompted me to study a little deeper.

Pekka

Offline Will_D

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #32 on: May 10, 2018, 05:18:22 PM »
When I was shearing sheep on a Welsh hill farm in the late 60s after a week your Levis were totally waterproofed!

Has no-one mentioned Waxoil? Car I built in the 80s was full of it! Chasis rails were 4 x 2 by 3 mm steel box.
It was a Burlington Arrow built on a Triumph Vitesse donor. Straight 6, triple Webber 40s!!
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Offline nrml

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #33 on: May 26, 2018, 10:17:17 AM »
It's a bit of a late suggestion, but I'll add it anyway in case someone else comes searching someday. I use this https://www.bilthamber.com/dynax-uc for corrosion protection. It takes a few weeks to lose the tackiness but the performance cant be faulted. I have never had to re-spray it on a machine yet. The price isn't too bad either as a little goes a long way.


Online awemawson

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #35 on: May 26, 2018, 11:57:05 AM »
I bet none of these commercial alternatives smell as good as my Genuine Turpentine and Beeswax concoction.  :clap:
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline mcostello

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #36 on: May 26, 2018, 02:59:19 PM »
Do They make bees wax like They make baby oil?
High Speed steel in a Carbide world.

Offline appletree

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #37 on: May 27, 2018, 04:44:37 AM »
Back in the 70s when I was an apprentice we used to wash the lathe down wit an oil/paraffin mix, maybe 10 to 20% oil.
These days I mix slideway oil and automotive panel wipe mixture.
The panel wipe cleans the machine then leaves a very thin film of oil.
Obviously no use on wood working machinery, but would beeswax dissolve in panel wipe, to be fair I have only "speed" read this thread, but just wondered.

Phil     

Online awemawson

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #38 on: May 27, 2018, 07:26:45 AM »
Phil, I'd be surprised if it didn't - it seems to dissolve in most spirity solvents - just the time taken seems to vary
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline PekkaNF

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #39 on: May 27, 2018, 10:31:39 AM »
Pretty much all common oils, waxes and solvents work in rust retardant. And pretty much the only problem is with "wax" residue with finishing system. Best to clear off all silicon and such....problem being that many incredients are "trade secret" or low quantity (impurities etc.) that does not interest concotion marketer, but interests the person that sprays paint/laccure and it has million blisters.

Once I was renovating daugter's room and had considerable problme painting radior....after washing, stripping the pain, matting and the paint developed silicon tell tale blisters....had to ditch the paint, roller, brush and tray, lett the paint dry, wash it with silicon remover, mat, repaint. Clacking bell.

I have heard may times someone spraying the first dry lubricant or such "universal oil" on the garge on the thicknesplaner and then had troublem with laquere.

I would trust pretty much on besswax and "natural" solvents if my finish has same incredients.

Pekka

Offline Fergus OMore

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #40 on: May 27, 2018, 01:11:26 PM »
Do paint and resin manufacturers still use silicones dissolved in carbon tetrachloride to stop modified resins foaming in gas kettles? :bang:

Anyone with practical knowledge comment on what happens today?

Regards

Norm

Offline russ57

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Re: Sprayable Wax - does it exist?
« Reply #41 on: May 30, 2018, 01:31:11 AM »