Author Topic: Raising the boxford  (Read 472 times)

Offline Coldrolled

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Raising the boxford
« on: August 02, 2018, 03:44:40 PM »
Howdi,

I have got my first ever lathe up and running a boxford BUD, well sort of.

I feel that it is a little to low for me when using the lathe and would also like to remove the wooden wedges from underneath it for someting a little more robust.

What are peoples ideads on adjustable feet (have to be adjustable due to my floor in the workshop)? My plan is to weld a plate over some 2" tube, tap a m16 hole and use some bolts as the adjusters. Only lifting it around 70mm. Would anyone advise bolting it down or would just sitting be fine.

I chose the desing listed as thats what i have kicking around the workshop.

Cheers

Offline seadog

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Re: Raising the boxford
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2018, 04:09:53 PM »
This was my solution

Offline Coldrolled

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Re: Raising the boxford
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2018, 05:09:14 PM »
Cheers seadog,

Wow, I must commend you on the clenliness of your workshop floor. Do you find that stable enough? I am judging from the picture that they are M8 at around 50mm lift?


Offline seadog

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Re: Raising the boxford
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2018, 07:24:16 PM »
If only. That was just after I'd built it and was in the process of refurbishing the lathe. They're 16mm if I recall and they raised it by about 4" and I had to open out the holes in the cabinet slightly to get them to fit.
I was lucky to come across four new ones on eBay, I think they're made by Bosch. I paid around 24 including postage, which is probably a quarter of list price.

Offline RotarySMP

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Re: Raising the boxford
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2018, 08:37:31 AM »
I used the 60x60mm version of these to raise up my lathe, and especially to stabilise the lathe on the uneven tiles of my basement.
https://www.ebay.at/itm/Maschinenschuh-Maschinenfus-Maschinenfuse-MFSL-Serie-Schwingelement-NEU-OVP/331774261417?hash=item4d3f4978a9:m:mnrNTlaHH1PI0RQ0__836kw
They are excellent. The rubber damping makes a subjective difference to the smoothness of the machine.
Mark

Offline Coldrolled

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Re: Raising the boxford
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2018, 03:37:38 PM »
I did do some measuring and yes i do need to ream out the holes to tap them so i am on the right path. I did look at feet but given the price of them, i thought i would aid my addiction and make some. One section of my problem is to raid skips, my job sites and keep it for later use and found some stuff.

"its not junk, its for an unknow project that you have not told me about yet" Famous line to my wife. Be warned, does not work everytime.

RotarySMP, Thank you for your input on the rubber feet, once again, i have some cattle mat - Dont ask but i have some. I think i will weld a small plate on the inside and use the rubber to dampen it.

It does do a lot of chattering at the moment as it is only wedged with some old scraps of wood, well mdf if you call that wood

Offline beeshed

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Re: Raising the boxford
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2018, 11:06:18 AM »
Don't stick a lathe up on wibbly-wobbly stalks. Git a bit of 4x4 fencepost out of a skip long enough to stick out a few inches each side for extra stability with little 1/8 in pad feet at the headstock end and a central pad at the tailstock end if you are moving it around a lot, or same as the headstock and take 30 seconds to shim it to not rock.