Author Topic: Frankinstine needs your help  (Read 453 times)

Offline Coldrolled

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Frankinstine needs your help
« on: August 03, 2018, 04:30:27 PM »
Sorry peoples, but i wondered if anyone had any ideas on this one. I am not tight, i just like learning and making my life hard.

Let me introduce Frankinstine, He is well tanned and did suffer 3rd degree burns while in the workshop fire. After some help, he was removed in one piece and he was brought back to mine for some recovery.

I need to remove his tan and give him a good spray tan to bring him back to life. My prefered method is electrolisys but given his size, the only place i ahve is the pond and the fish dont want any room mates and we have all seen what happed to Frankinstine last time electric passed through him. :zap: I know i could take the easy option and pay to have it blasted but it would be a little more than beer monies. LOL

What ideas do other people have?

Offline PK

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Re: Frankinstine needs your help
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2018, 06:44:10 PM »
That'd be a wire brush wheel on an angle grinder job for me....

Offline vtsteam

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Re: Frankinstine needs your help
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2018, 09:14:57 PM »
Looks like just light surface rust. I'm assuming you'll re-paint. I'm not too fussy for something like that, so I'd probably take sandpaper and wire brush per PK to it and brush on Rust-Oleum enamel.

Alternative -- I once got a gallon of some rust conversion stuff down in Louisiana -- a phosphate of some kind, and it worked wonders from a spray bottle, and made a good primer as well for later paint.

Then the oddly appropriate choice, blast it?  :)
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Offline PekkaNF

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Re: Frankinstine needs your help
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2018, 03:10:44 AM »
Sheetmetal mostly, Sand balastig cabinet?

How far you gong to go to fix it? Just to make it usable (replace burned hardware and outside paint that does not attract layers of grime) or pride and joy?

I as PK I would give it a fast go with wirebrush or maybe these nylonbrushes or such that are more gentle and integrate less rust into structure. I am pretty confident that wirebrush with powertool beats the rust into metal surface and also easily stretches sheetmetal. Needs care and soft touch.

Then I would remove all hardware, latches and parts I need to replace.

Then I would detail the parts I keep first with hand brush (you really hate when wire brush in the agle grinders grabs the edge of the steel plate).

I tend to use a liquid plumber or such to remove paint from cast iron lumps and such bucket size objects, most paint comes off with a scraper after that. I never had badly burned metal to paint, I would imagine that if the paint really sticks there after wirebrushing it is pretty stable (if the new paint does not chemically attack the old paint).

Last thing is to use those soft abrassive sponges:


And then fast wash with warm water, druing with hot air gun or leaf blower (there will be water in the crevises, unless you give it a little hurricane), followed with an immediate aplication of mild phosphoric accid (many primers, paint washes and such have the right amount) and then paint.

Some "etch" base paints need to painted over while still wet or tacky. These paints are intended new base painted or cold rolled steel surface (usually new sheet metal has some oil from rolling and/or rust preventative, it is washed before use, but there will be little left, most car paint systems have an etch primer....usefull for the parts that you just fabricated from new sheet metal). These etch paints are not generally comptatible with polyester resin hardeners, they pretty much prevent hardener from working. You either avoid etch primer, or coat it with with "block", let it dry and then bondo.....probably not a problem here, but is good to know.

Pekka

Offline Coldrolled

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Re: Frankinstine needs your help
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2018, 09:11:23 AM »
Looks like just light surface rust. I'm assuming you'll re-paint. I'm not too fussy for something like that, so I'd probably take sandpaper and wire brush per PK to it and brush on Rust-Oleum enamel.

Alternative -- I once got a gallon of some rust conversion stuff down in Louisiana -- a phosphate of some kind, and it worked wonders from a spray bottle, and made a good primer as well for later paint.

Then the oddly appropriate choice, blast it?  :)

I do have some oxalic acid, i have only used a small amount on a small piece to test but no more than that. i may just do that and put some in a spray bottle. Thanks for the idea

Offline Coldrolled

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Re: Frankinstine needs your help
« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2018, 09:22:23 AM »
Sheetmetal mostly, Sand balastig cabinet?

How far you gong to go to fix it? Just to make it usable (replace burned hardware and outside paint that does not attract layers of grime) or pride and joy?

I as PK I would give it a fast go with wirebrush or maybe these nylonbrushes or such that are more gentle and integrate less rust into structure. I am pretty confident that wirebrush with powertool beats the rust into metal surface and also easily stretches sheetmetal. Needs care and soft touch.

Then I would remove all hardware, latches and parts I need to replace.

Then I would detail the parts I keep first with hand brush (you really hate when wire brush in the agle grinders grabs the edge of the steel plate).

I tend to use a liquid plumber or such to remove paint from cast iron lumps and such bucket size objects, most paint comes off with a scraper after that. I never had badly burned metal to paint, I would imagine that if the paint really sticks there after wirebrushing it is pretty stable (if the new paint does not chemically attack the old paint).

Last thing is to use those soft abrassive sponges:


And then fast wash with warm water, druing with hot air gun or leaf blower (there will be water in the crevises, unless you give it a little hurricane), followed with an immediate aplication of mild phosphoric accid (many primers, paint washes and such have the right amount) and then paint.

Some "etch" base paints need to painted over while still wet or tacky. These paints are intended new base painted or cold rolled steel surface (usually new sheet metal has some oil from rolling and/or rust preventative, it is washed before use, but there will be little left, most car paint systems have an etch primer....usefull for the parts that you just fabricated from new sheet metal). These etch paints are not generally comptatible with polyester resin hardeners, they pretty much prevent hardener from working. You either avoid etch primer, or coat it with with "block", let it dry and then bondo.....probably not a problem here, but is good to know.

Pekka

I was looking at the nylon rust pads but have never used one. As for the wire wheels, i must agree with you they do like to grab and also fling little wires in the direction of my face mask and i am sure its with anger. lol. The plan is to use etch primer then a good coat of the old black. My wife says i have to paint Frankinstine down the side of it in some form os snot green colour. He has been sat in the garden for a year now so i think it may be time to retire him from bing a garden piece and get cracking.