Author Topic: Slightly scary machining  (Read 1387 times)

Offline WeldingRod

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Slightly scary machining
« on: January 26, 2019, 10:17:27 PM »
I scored a facing head on that auction site... who could resist the Copper control ring!  I tried it out tonight.  It works!



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Offline SwarfnStuff

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2019, 11:43:54 PM »
Well, that sure is different. (To me anyway)
       Guess your finish comes with practice on using the copper / brass ring thing?
OH and you are correct in the scary bit. Not sure I would like my fingers close to that gizmo.
Thanks for showing,
John B
Converting good metal into swarf sometimes ending up with something useful. ;-)

Offline Doc

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2019, 10:21:00 AM »
Have never seen any like that but have used a Wolhhaupter which is very capable of doing that plus tappers and facing the bottoms of holes.

Offline Mike E.

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2019, 02:38:03 PM »
I would think that the tool was not designed to be used in a mill, but for milling in a lathe; where the material is rotating in the chuck, and the tool is manually operated in the tailstock.
Mike

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Online seadog

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2019, 02:55:20 PM »
Have you never seen a taper boring head? It's adjusted in exactly the same way.

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Offline philf

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2019, 03:21:54 PM »
I would think that the tool was not designed to be used in a mill, but for milling in a lathe; where the material is rotating in the chuck, and the tool is manually operated in the tailstock.

 :scratch:

Why would you want to do that? What would be the advantage over using the cross slide with a tool mounted in a toolpost?
Phil Fern
Location: Marple, Cheshire

Offline WeldingRod

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2019, 04:26:25 PM »
It's got a once per rev catch, and the lead screw has a ratchet with about 8 teeth.
The control ring has a big flange on the bottom to keep your fingers from sliding down.
I might need to modify it with some sort of adjustable stop.
Its _possible_ that I was running it faster than might be sensible.  It didn't come with instructions ;-)

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Offline WeldingRod

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2019, 04:27:35 PM »
It wouldn't be much use in the tailstock.  Lots more work than a normal boring head's screw.

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Online tom osselton

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2019, 08:47:09 PM »
It is quite interesting though! I probably would have got it just to see how it worked.

Offline velocette

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2019, 10:29:50 PM »
Hi Facing tool I do not think so! It is much more useful as boring bar for quick advance of the cutter without stopping the machine.

Offline WeldingRod

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #10 on: January 30, 2019, 08:50:38 AM »
That's a good point!  Could be handy if you have a bunch of passes to do!

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Offline Alphawolf45

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #11 on: January 30, 2019, 08:52:45 AM »
I see no real use for that gadget. Years ago I heard about such a thing and I may be wrong but the way I understood it the tool would get smaller when grasped so that it could be quickly withdrawn from a bored hole without scoring the bore.
    I have some nice tools that seldom get used. I might have popped for that tool had I seen it.. It is definitely unusual...Ummmmmm I presume that you can grasp the copper ring when spindle direction is reversed and it will then get smaller for withdrawing from a bored hole?
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Offline mcostello

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #12 on: January 30, 2019, 12:55:42 PM »
Have personally used one and it indeed does go in a mill. It is the bees knees for grooves, the ratchet clicks helps to count to the size wanted.
High Speed steel in a Carbide world.

Offline appletree

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #13 on: January 30, 2019, 01:47:26 PM »
Correct me if I'm wrong its a boring and facing head for use in a mill, particularly useful for things like grooves for circlips or bores in things like castings that are too large to swing in a lathe.
Not dangerous if treated correctly and respected, like all things engineering.
This Particular example does not look ultra expensive, but still useful and well worth having, maybe not used every day, but when used with every penny

Regards Phil 

Offline Alphawolf45

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #14 on: January 30, 2019, 02:34:09 PM »
  WeldingRod
 I'd sure like to know how that thing works inside. Can you google up a reference for us ? Is there a name on it ?
 
   To me the scary thing about using a boring head is the possibilty of getting a bad finish/chatter down inside an important part.

  Lathes scare me far more than anything on a mill.
I am not actually retired ,I merely find myself disabled by an intolerance for productive activity.

Offline WeldingRod

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #15 on: January 30, 2019, 04:16:40 PM »
This is a non-fancy one.  Only one feed direction (out), and no adjustable stop.

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Offline WeldingRod

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #16 on: January 30, 2019, 04:17:55 PM »
It's really just a boring head with a toothed wheel added on the screw.  The flying ring has the mating single tooth.
No names on it at all..

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Offline appletree

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2019, 02:35:08 PM »
Here is a very pretty one, I bought it because it was cuddly no 1 mt a thou per devision, I have 2 others (bigger) a big one can do small work but nice to have all the same.





Offline efrench

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #18 on: January 31, 2019, 02:52:13 PM »
It would have been less scary if the workpiece had been properly secured in the vise.  :scratch:

Offline WeldingRod

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #19 on: January 31, 2019, 10:28:24 PM »
Yeah, I thought about getting a v block...

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Offline AdeV

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Re: Slightly scary machining
« Reply #20 on: February 01, 2019, 03:24:46 PM »
I want one!

It's for boring holes to size without all the faff of stopping the machine, adjusting the screw, tightening down, rinse repeat until out to size. Also, as someone above said, ideal for cutting internal circlip/o-ring grooves, with an appropriately shaped cutter.

Each "click" will move the head out a defined amount (how much depends on your device, some are adjustable). So to make, say, a 20mm hole (pre-drilled 15mm) when your rachet moves 0.1mm per click, you'd simply bore to depth using the quill drive - or by hand... - raise the head, grab the control ring, count (say) 5 clicks, release, bore, raise, grab, click-click-click-click-click, bore, 3 more times (if my mental arithmetic is right) and presto - a 20mm hole, in a fraction of the time it'd take with a regular boring head. Now imagine you have a dozen of such holes to make...

You could also use it for roughing out a taper, either way up (but if it's narrow-end-up, don't try to withdraw the tool all the way!); so plunge Zmm at diameter X, raise, click, plunge z-1mm, raise, click, z-2mm, etc. or whatever your measurements are. Also ideal for cutting a hole where a bearing needs to go; endless1 uses!

It's kind of pointless for "accessible surface" facing, as you'd just use the biggest end/shell mill you're comfortable with & do X or Y passes to taste; but good to give you a nice flat bottom on a blind hole you've just bored or drilled... so long as you're good at counting the clicks!


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Ade.
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