Author Topic: Gloves in a Bottle  (Read 500 times)

Offline Jim Dobson

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Gloves in a Bottle
« on: September 16, 2020, 01:55:54 AM »

Gloves in a Bottle....its great stuff and now I wouldn't be without it!

Hope this helps someone out who hasn't heard of it.


Offline Brass_Machine

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2020, 02:02:06 PM »
Interesting. Never heard of it.

Might have to give it a try. Thanks!
Science is fun.

We're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.

Offline timby

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2020, 04:18:15 PM »
15.39P    for a  240 ML  bottle.


https://bit.ly/35GH9n1

Offline philf

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2020, 08:35:21 AM »
15.39P    for a  240 ML  bottle

Have just bought a 240ml bottle from Superdrug for 9.99.

I hope it works!
Phil Fern
Location: Marple, Cheshire

Offline Jim Dobson

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2020, 07:07:54 AM »
A little bit goes a long way. Just rub it well in and let it dry.

I put it on in the morning and then again after lunch if I'm in my shed in the afternoon.

Totally stopped my skin cracking and makes clean of paint, grease, oils and all the other stuff we get on our hands so much easier.

Offline awemawson

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2020, 08:11:05 AM »
Years back there was a product called "Rosalex" or something similar sounding that did the same thing. Came in a tub and you scooped out 'just a bit' and rubbed it well in, especially under nails, cuticles  etc and it made hand washing after pulling engines apart much easier.
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline awemawson

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2020, 08:29:34 AM »
Seems that it is still available, but spelt with a Z not an S:

https://www.rozalex.co.uk/
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline Muzzerboy

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2020, 09:10:16 AM »
It's certainly a nice little earner for them. Being a Mercan outfit, they get away with an MSDS that tells you almost nothing whatsoever ("Ingredients are proprietary or non-hazardous"). That usually indicates that the product is a very simple and low cost, hidden behind a slick marketing front.

https://www.glovesinabottle.com/wp-content/uploads/download/SDS_GIAB.pdf

What you CAN deduce from the MSDS and the description is that this is almost certainly a simple emulsion of something like a silicone oil in water. It's "non flammable" but "Oxides of Carbon and Silicone can be released". Silicone oils are often added to cooking oils, so you can understand they are considered safe to slather over your skin.

You wouldn't want to use this if you are handling electronics products in your work. Certainly, there are situations where they would not be considered welcome, eg are blanket banned from use in many products such as automotive components.

Offline WeldingRod

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2020, 02:56:45 PM »
And, do not even think of getting it near something you are going to paint!
That stuff is banned in paint shops because a fingerprint from somebody wearing it will not take paint!

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk


Offline Jim Dobson

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #9 on: September 18, 2020, 05:36:12 PM »
And, do not even think of getting it near something you are going to paint!
That stuff is banned in paint shops because a fingerprint from somebody wearing it will not take paint!

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

I've stripped and repainted many steel steam engines (probably around 40) and never had the slightest problem using this product.

Offline philf

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2020, 05:07:09 PM »
Tried it today for the first time and I'm suitably impressed!
Phil Fern
Location: Marple, Cheshire

Offline Jim Dobson

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #11 on: September 21, 2020, 06:33:37 PM »
Tried it today for the first time and I'm suitably impressed!

Glad you liked it Phil.

Offline kayzed1

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #12 on: September 21, 2020, 07:49:34 PM »
Years back there was a product called "Rosalex" or something similar sounding that did the same thing. Came in a tub and you scooped out 'just a bit' and rubbed it well in, especially under nails, cuticles  etc and it made hand washing after pulling engines apart much easier.

We used to use that when we did main cable joints in the good ole GPO, in Poly cables and epoxy puty was used to close the joint we had a green tub and a pink tub, one was to remove the other.  worked well as i never had a problem with my sink.

Offline philf

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #13 on: September 22, 2020, 03:13:01 AM »
Tried it today for the first time and I'm suitably impressed!

Glad you liked it Phil.

Just going down to the workshop now so I'll be trying it again. Thanks for the tip Jim!
Phil Fern
Location: Marple, Cheshire

Offline vtsteam

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #14 on: September 22, 2020, 10:21:51 PM »
SBS-46 is what we used to use in the 70's and 80's when doing epoxy work in boat building:

https://www.walmart.com/ip/SBS-46-Protective-Cream-1-Each/742230713
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
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Offline Fergus OMore

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #15 on: September 23, 2020, 05:21:10 AM »
Comments on another web have been very mixed.
Regardless of what was used as hand protection in the past, we, at least we in the United Kingdom have received endless strictures about trying to minimise or eradicate the Covid-19 virus by repeated handwashing with soap or where this is impractical, by using an alcohol gel.
This advice comes from medical and scientific recommendations fed to us from the highest level of Uk Government.

For my self, I am simply following Government guidelines which contradict what the OP is trying to influence us on what I am assured is on a number of web sites. Me?? , I have a B-13 deficiency at the age of 90-- and have a major skingraft on the inside of my left palm.
To assist in what seemingly is adherence to government guidelines, I use refined lard oil for machining- and appear to be non the worse for this.

For a bit of light reading, I read the safety instructions for this product and note-- can you actually crdit it- the use----of GLOVES.

Whatever next?


Norman

Offline Muzzerboy

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #16 on: September 23, 2020, 06:04:29 AM »
That MSDS tells you almost nothing. This "commercial secret" defence allows the true makeup to be concealed. Some of the products I've seen on sale (partic in the US) are a marketing triumph, reselling bulk commodities at fantastic markups. Things like cleaners, oils and solvents are particular favourites.

Offline vtsteam

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #17 on: September 23, 2020, 10:20:16 AM »
Along those lines (and I once mentioned it here), I find the best oil base (enamel) paint brush cleaner is:

After you're finished painting, add a small drip of salad oil and a squirt of ordinary liquid dish soap directly onto the brush, and work it in well.

Then rinse with water. Repeat a second time, sling off excess water, shape and let dry. The bristles stay nice and pliable, and the brush is truly clean. The cost is nil, and you always have the ingredients on hand.

You don't need brush cleaner, paint thinner, turpentine, mineral spirits, etc. all of which nowadays are very expensive, are themselves difficult to dispose of, are toxic, have high VOCs, are environmentally unsound, and usually sit in a tin can until spilled or evaporated. Worse still are the brushes (some of us  :wack: ) forget and leave in the cans, which end up with a clotted mess on the ends, loose bristles, and are never quite clean anyway.

I don't know how many thousands of re-usable brushes I've thrown away in my lifetime or gallons of paint thinner paid for and evaporated before I realized that oil paint can be thinned by tiny amount of salad oil, and dish soap emulsifies that combination (it doesn't by itself work on modern enamels, you need the salad oil as an intermediate). But since then I've saved both money, time and aggravation, and I have long lasting re-usable brushes when I need them.

btw if you get a drop of paint on your shirt, you can prevent the spot, by applying a drop of salad oil first, rubbing it into the cloth, and than adding dish soap to the mix. Launder as usual, and the paint will disappear. This doesn't work if the paint has dried, obviously. However if you catch it in time, the oil/soap combination will prevent it from drying, and you don't have to launder right away.

If you try to treat a spot of paint with paint thinner, it merely spreads the stain in to the fabric. Oil and dish soap is a far superior treatment.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2020, 10:44:33 AM by vtsteam »
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
www.sredmond.com

Offline philf

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Re: Gloves in a Bottle
« Reply #18 on: September 23, 2020, 05:44:20 PM »
After you're finished painting, add a small drip of salad oil and a squirt of ordinary liquid dish soap directly onto the brush, and work it in well.

Then rinse with water. Repeat a second time, sling off excess water, shape and let dry. The bristles stay nice and pliable, and the brush is truly clean. The cost is nil, and you always have the ingredients on hand.


Vtsteam,

What constitutes salad oil? Will olive oil work?

I have recently taken to wrapping brushes in cling film if I know I'm going to use them in the next day or so. If not I've been binning them! Paint brush cleaner is so expensive and doesn't work anywhere near as well as it used to do. The effective active ingredient was probably something now considered unsafe.

I will give this a try soon.

Cheers.
Phil Fern
Location: Marple, Cheshire