Author Topic: The lathe arrives!  (Read 24352 times)

Offline AdeV

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The lathe arrives!
« on: November 07, 2009, 01:19:21 PM »
 :D :) :D

Dragged the elderly Edgwick home this afternoon, dunno what it weighs but it's right on the limit of my poor car trailer. Well, when combined with a tool grinder at any rate  ::)

No pics of the loading (forgot my camera), but once I'd backed the trailer into the workshop:



The streaks are because it bl**dy well rained. Beautiful sunny morning, and it was lovely & sunny all the way to the M6. Then it poxy rained. I was NOT best pleased. If you happened to be on the M6 today (Sat 7th) & saw me with my preciousssssss on board, then I was probably looking pretty tee'd off (that's the polite version).

Anyway, enough ranting at the oh-so-predictable weather, & on with the photos:



Cor, just look at the motor on that! If I decide to convert this lathe to single phase, that motor will make a great induction generator for my Lister engine :)

A couple of close-ups showing how the lathe is clamped to the trailer, the straps are just there to appease any passing policemen (the lathe didn't move a millimetre/0.0254" on the journey):



Tailstock - and is that a taper turning attachment? Or just the backside of the saddle?:



The space where it's going to live.



Now, before you all get jealous of the masses of space I have, and the fork-lift, let me just say this: The place costs me a fortune in rent & rates, it's impossible to heat in winter or cool in summer, and the fork lift belongs to the welding shop next door.

On the other hand, I do have loads of space, and the use of a fork-lift when I need it  :)


And finally, look what else followed me home:



Althogether, a pretty good haul I think. Tomorrow, I will install the lathe & start on the cleaning/refurbing of it. I'll also stick a fan heater near the motor; I don't know how much rain it ingested, but it's bound to be more than is good for it. Bloody weather.  ::)


Oops, grub time. L8r!
Cheers!
Ade.
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Offline John Hill

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2009, 02:23:34 PM »
I would not be too concerned about that motor getting wet as it looks like a splash proof type?  But I would open every electrical control box and make sure they are dry inside.

Othewise,   :ddb: :ddb: :ddb: :ddb: :ddb: :ddb:
From the den of The Artful Bodger

Offline boatmadman

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2009, 02:54:56 PM »
It was YOU held my wife up on the M6!!!

My tea was cold!

 :)
If it works, take it apart and find out why!

Offline slowcoach

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2009, 03:23:18 PM »
Big lathe that AdeV  :clap: I have one very similar to yours but mines an old Willson 7.5" x  36" beast, she was built in 1949, she's able to swing a piece of material 26" in diameter by 9" thick!
Anyway have fun with your Edgwick, she should serve you well for many years  :thumbup:

Rob

Offline AdeV

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2009, 06:03:30 PM »
It was YOU held my wife up on the M6!!!

My tea was cold!

 :)

How could your tea be cold if it was your missus who got held up on the motorway? Shurly you mean "My tea was late"?  :lol:

I would not be too concerned about that motor getting wet as it looks like a splash proof type?  But I would open every electrical control box and make sure they are dry inside.

Done, and they all look fine  :thumbup: I'll give the motor a closer look before I get it off the trailer tomorrow. If it's splashproof, that'll be excellent news.

Big lathe that AdeV  :clap: I have one very similar to yours but mines an old Willson 7.5" x  36" beast, she was built in 1949, she's able to swing a piece of material 26" in diameter by 9" thick!
Anyway have fun with your Edgwick, she should serve you well for many years  :thumbup:


Mine's not quite that big; I believe she'll take 20" by 5" with the gap removed, and supposedly 40" between centres, but I've not measured. She's 90" from end to end, and about 36" deep. The serial number appears to be "881" - but without knowing how many of these lathes were built, I've no idea what year that makes her. Or, for that matter, whether the "Plant No: 881" plate is actually the serial no, or Perkins' own numbering...

Cheers!
Ade.
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Offline chuck foster

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2009, 08:24:54 PM »
WOW..................now thats a lathe  :bugeye:

can't wait to see the projects you will be making with that  :clap:  :dremel:

chuck  :wave:
hitting and missing all the way :)

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Offline trevoratxtal

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2009, 05:08:58 AM »
Hello Adev.
What a beautiful mature lady !, with a lot of T.L.C it should serve you a lifetime.
My advice for what its worth is keep the three phase motor and invest in  phase converter for speed adjustment.
I done that last year on my two lathes and one Mill and now I wonder how I ever managed before.
The model you have looks like the Mark 1.
http://www.lathes.co.uk/edgwick/page2.html.
If so the flange fitting for the chuck may be your first Modder project.
I am sure many of us will look forward to your progress.
My Great love of life is My Harrison L5A,
http://www.lathes.co.uk/harrison/page6.html
a similar size to your  Edgwick, my wife tells me I spend more care on it than I do her, My reply is that the lathe  is older so should have more care, PS my wife is the eldest but don't tell her.
The Grinder looks a great acquisition as well, I am sure we will hear more of it in due course.
Trev
« Last Edit: November 08, 2009, 05:54:57 AM by trevatxtal »

Offline AdeV

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2009, 05:18:21 AM »
Hello Adev.
What a beautiful mature lady !, with a lot of T.L.C it should serve you a lifetime.
My advice for what its worth is keep the three phase motor and invest in  phase converter for speed adjustment.
I done that last year on my two lathes and one Mill and now I wonder how I ever managed before.
The model you have looks like the Mark 1.
http://www.lathes.co.uk/edgwick/page2.html.
If so the flange fitting for the chuck may be your first Modder project.
I am sure many of us will look forward to your progress.
My Great love of life is My Harrison L5A, a similar size to your  Edgwick, my wife tells me I spend more care on it than I do her, My reply is that the lathe  is older so should have more care, PS my wife is the eldest but don't tell her.
The Grinder looks a great acquisition as well, I am sure we will hear more of it in due course.
Trev

The welding shop next door have a Harrison L5, circa 1950s. Originally, I'd tentatively agreed to buy it off them for a song (all they use it for is to wind welding wire from BIG (cheap) reels to little reels (that fit on the welding machines) - a disgraceful mis-use of a lathe IMHO. Unfortunately, the old boy dithered too long, so I ended up with Egdy instead. Their loss, my gain.

 :proj:

You're right that an early project will be the chuck mounting; I'm thinking a camlock system, but my machining skills may demand a threaded adapter to start with. I also need to make the morse taper sleeve that's mentioned on the lathes.co.uk site, as it's not come with the lathe.

Also, a quick-change toolpost; I'll have to make it because the current tool turret is HUGE, and I'll want the QCTP to be of a similar size.

First job, however, will be a couple of chuck keys, 'cos neither are with the lathe, and they're both different (one square, one hex)  :lol: Luckily, the mill is already up & running, and I have a dividing head, so lathe project #1 will be under way, possibly as early as this afternoon  :D
Cheers!
Ade.
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Offline trevoratxtal

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2009, 08:04:05 AM »
Hello again ref
""Also, a quick-change toolpost; I'll have to make it because the current tool turret is HUGE, and I'll want the QCTP to be of a similar size.""
I was forced to do an upload to follow on
http://madmodder.net/index.php?topic=2154.0
Perhaps not such a bad thing as I am always slow with the documentation.
Trev

Offline AdeV

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2009, 11:55:33 AM »
Now, I know you guys love photos, but this post is going to be VERY heavy on them. I apologise in advance to those of you on dial-up connections...

After a spot of farting around on a fork-lift truck, the machines are all in their final (for now...) locations:



I've still got the tooling "benches" (an old office desk & an old computer desk) to put in place, and the main workbench to put back, but I'm happy with the machines where they are. One problem, the floor under the lathe turned out to be not quite as level as it appeared; the headstock was free to wobble about quite a bit. So I fired up the mill & bullied a piece of 1/2" flat into a taper, which I hammered under the lathe. Result: No more wobble - although I do need to check to make sure the bed's not twisted:


Interestingly, the Edgwick wasn't made by Edgwick, but by George Swift & Sons Ltd exclusively (no less) for Alfred Herbert Ltd. Unfortunately, the green paintwork belies the age & condition of the lathe; it's been very badly & excessively painted IMHO. A job for "when I get a round tuit" will be to strip & re-paint, somewhat more sympathetically than just lashing the pea green on. If anyone knows what colour a 30's Edgwick would have been, please do let me know.

Right, on with the pictures. Here's a bit of an overview of the carriage/tailstock. I've slapped a bit of "general purpose" oil on the ways, just to stop them from rusting any more (there was the tiniest hint of surface rust, but that seems to have been from swarf rather than from the bed). The allen keys were to remove the aluminium casting from the front of the carriage (not seen here), which had collected some swarf in a ball between it & the ways. By the time this pic was taken, the carriage & tailstock both slide smoothly and easily up & down the ways, although the carriage does seem to start binding up a little towards the tailstock end: I guess that's either a twist in the bed, or wear in the ways.


What I though might be a taper attachment IS a taper attachment  :beer: :beer: :beer:

I just need to figure out how to use it. Doh!

That tool post: It'll take upto 2" thick tool steel. Which is just monsterous in my opinion.

It has some kind of rachet type mechanism in it: As one swings the lever anti-clockwise, the toolpost kind of picks up & rotates 90 degrees, where it latches. The lever is then pulled clockwise to tighten. Repeat until bored... I guess it'll pass for a toolpost until I've made a QCTP.

The top of the headstock lifts off to reveal a gearbox of many gears:


...but not much oil:


It also revealed the first problem:


The picture's not terribly clear, but that's a chipped tooth. There are several chipped teeth on that gear; it's the main drive for the mid-range settings. To get from High to Low range (& vice versa), a gear carrier has to be moved past that gear. As there's no way of disengaging, it has to pass through in mesh. Obviously, over time, the gears have been banged into; maybe an operator not waiting until the gears have come to a complete stop, or maybe just being violent with the gear lever. Anyway; I can turn it all by hand from the chuck, and there don't seem to be any completely missing teeth. I can probably just avoid using the mid-ranges to begin with. Eventually, I will have to strip the headstock & replace that gear.

The only other issue is almost entirely cosmetic: A broken guide between two of the screwcutting gearbox settings:


If those two issues turn out to be all that's wrong with it, I will be a properly happy bunny :)


And in case you thought I'd forgotten, I managed to get the tool grinder stood up & put in place too:


It's much niftier than I thought when I first looked at it: The tables can be wound in & out using the knurled screw visible in this pic:

The fence just drops into the slot, so I'll be able to make the perfect HSS cutting tools with it. The table can be angled with a screw underneath. You can't see the screw, but the angle gauge is pretty clear:


As it stands, there's no abrasive material on those wheels, they're just steel wheels. I'm not sure what that's about; maybe I'm supposed to put some kind of disk on there? Anyone got any ideas? Here's a couple of detail shots of the right-hand grinding wheel:



Oh, and it has a nifty little coolant tank with dinky drain tap at the back. I guess this should normally contain water, when grinding Carbide; will water also suffice for HSS?





Anyway, having done all that & a little bit of cleaning on the lathe, my back called time on me. So, just a couple more photos to keep you entertained...

This is the mill I made the tapered wedge on. I hadn't cleaned it up when I took the photo, although I have done now. Nothing worse than leaving a bunch of chips lying around.:


And just to prove I still have a load of tidying up to do, this is what's waiting behind me when I'm stood at the milling machine:




Now, for ${deity}'s sake, please don't ask me WHY! Because I might have to mumble & think of an excuse....
Cheers!
Ade.
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Offline John Stevenson

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2009, 12:11:34 PM »
Ade,
I used to have one of these, still have the original tooling cabinet for it [ no I use it ] but I reckon I may have some backplates and possibly a face plate.

John S.
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Offline AdeV

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #11 on: November 08, 2009, 12:14:28 PM »
Ade,
I used to have one of these, still have the original tooling cabinet for it [ no I use it ] but I reckon I may have some backplates and possibly a face plate.

John S.

PM sent, thanks!
Cheers!
Ade.
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Offline sbwhart

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #12 on: November 08, 2009, 12:25:37 PM »
Some real nice  beefy kit you've got there Ade
 :thumbup:

Thanks for showing

Stew
A little bit of clearance never got in the road
 :wave:

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Offline John Stevenson

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #13 on: November 08, 2009, 12:48:21 PM »
Reckon I may have a steady as well but need to get a rope round my waste and a pocket full of breadcrumbs before I go start looking.

BTW mine was badged up as Herbert and Edgewick, only got rid of it because it wasn't big enough.

John S.
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Offline steve

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #14 on: November 08, 2009, 03:29:40 PM »
The steel wheels you have are probably diamond lapping wheels for touching up carbide tools if i'm not mistaken.

regards   Steve

Offline John Stevenson

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #15 on: November 08, 2009, 06:54:09 PM »
Who's a lucky boy then ?

Found these.
'Cuse pics, crappy cell phone.



Steady buried under a lathe.





20" faceplate, 12" face plate, 12 " catchplate, 7" swiss cheese plate, 12 " 4 jaw Pratt chuck in good nick but not the backplate with the rule on it, that's a big threaded one, very early Colchester ?

John S.
John Stevenson

Offline AdeV

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #16 on: November 08, 2009, 07:04:26 PM »
 :jaw:

Wow, John, that's some haul! That 20" faceplate looks huge (and heavy)!



The steel wheels you have are probably diamond lapping wheels for touching up carbide tools if i'm not mistaken.


Steve; should I expect to feel any roughness on the wheels? Because they just look like plain steel to me (you can even see a touch of surface rust)?

The "Carbide tools only" notice on the light post certainly suggests you're correct. If anyone knows where I might get an 8" wheel suitable for side grinding, that will fit that grinder, I'd be forever grateful.  Will exchange :beer: for info...  :thumbup:
Cheers!
Ade.
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Offline John Stevenson

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #17 on: November 08, 2009, 07:08:50 PM »
:jaw:

Wow, John, that's some haul! That 20" faceplate looks huge (and heavy)!


 If anyone knows where I might get an 8" wheel suitable for side grinding, that will fit that grinder, I'd be forever grateful.  Will exchange :beer: for info...  :thumbup:

Plate isn't that heavy as it's not got a thick rim, the 20" one on my TOS is about 2 1/2" thick and bloody heavy.

Got a stack of wheels I'll check what's there, got loads of 8" white tool and cutter wheels, probably about 50 or 60 or so, have to do this tomorrow as I'm not sure which shed they got thrown in.

John S.
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Offline AdeV

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #18 on: November 08, 2009, 07:16:52 PM »

Plate isn't that heavy as it's not got a thick rim, the 20" one on my TOS is about 2 1/2" thick and bloody heavy.

Got a stack of wheels I'll check what's there, got loads of 8" white tool and cutter wheels, probably about 50 or 60 or so, have to do this tomorrow as I'm not sure which shed they got thrown in.


You'd better tell me what beer you like.... I have a feeling I'll be bringing some over   :thumbup:
Cheers!
Ade.
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Offline dsquire

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #19 on: November 08, 2009, 10:38:30 PM »
AdeV

Looks like you have picked up some seriously nice equipment there. Once you get it all settled away it should provide many hour of enjoyment. Thanks for providing the many pictures of it all. Happy Machining.  :ddb: :ddb: :ddb: :ddb:

Cheers  :beer:

Don
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'til your good is better,
and your better best

Offline steve

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #20 on: November 09, 2009, 08:33:10 AM »
The wheels will feel smooth to the touch but will cut carbide tools very well.you will not be able to "rough out" carbide tips very easily as the lapping wheels will only remove carbide slowly so you may need to get some green grinding wheels for a standard pedestal grinder for that.the lapping wheels must be used wet though or they will deteriorate quickly,it can get a bit damp when you do them so a waterproof apron can be a godsend(better than wet plums if you get my drift).

   regards Steve

Offline steve

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #21 on: November 09, 2009, 08:46:00 AM »
Ps  if it has been used proprly in the past one wheel will be of a coarser grade than the other,hard to tell just by looking but when you start to grind tips it should be apparent which is which.
   regards  Steve

Offline AdeV

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #22 on: November 09, 2009, 11:29:43 AM »
Thanks Steve - I'll need to get a different plug for it (4 conductor instead of 5), then I'll give it a whirl. The coolant tank is obviously for water, then; unfortunately, one of the taps is broken off, so I will have to repair it somehow.


Meanwhile....

There's a lube chart on the back of the switchgear which recommends/requires "Evco HG 100" oil, for basically everything. Unfortunately, according to Google, there's no such stuff.

Anyone got any idea what Evco HG 100 might be, and where I might get some - or a suitable alternative??
Cheers!
Ade.
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Offline tinkerer

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #23 on: November 09, 2009, 12:22:31 PM »
My research gives extra virgin coconut oil. EVCO. I would think HG means high grade and 100 would be the viscosity. I could be wrong.
Tink

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Offline AdeV

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SHE LIVES!!!
« Reply #24 on: November 09, 2009, 12:34:34 PM »
:D :D :D SHE LIVES!!! :D :D :D
I didn't run her for long, due to the lack of headstock oil, but tried a few gears out. Runs nice, a bit noisy but I think that's to be expected. I just need to make me a chuck key now so I can have a quick shot at turning some metal, to get a feel for her. Or of her. Oooer.

Eeeeee, I could crush a grape!  :ddb:

Mind you, I'll not win any awards for sticking to the electrical code...  :zap:

My research gives extra virgin coconut oil. EVCO. I would think HG means high grade and 100 would be the viscosity. I could be wrong.

Yeah, that's as close as I got to oil, I just find it hard to believe they'd recommend coconut oil? Surely one of the Mobil Vactra range would be better?

Cheers!
Ade.
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Offline tinkerer

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #25 on: November 09, 2009, 02:53:49 PM »
I have no idea what a good substitute would be. The 100 may mean 100%. Amazon sells it by the gallon for $38.00 US.
Tink

The desire accomplished is sweet to the soul.
Prov 13:19

Offline AdeV

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #26 on: November 09, 2009, 03:40:41 PM »
I have no idea what a good substitute would be. The 100 may mean 100%. Amazon sells it by the gallon for $38.00 US.

Not in the UK they don't - it's all ultra-expensive "health" stuff, or hair conditioner, or similar, and comes in little tiny pots or bottles... Anyway, I had a slightly closer look at the lube chart, and did a bit of deductive reasoning (probably entirely wrong, knowing me  ::)), which leads me to believe it may be a lube supplied by Houghton Edgar Vaughan  ::):



I've sent them an e-mail... hopefully they'll reply. Thanks for taking the time to try to puzzle this one out for me  :thumbup:

Meantime, I couldn't resist a little play. The first job was to make a chuck key, there being none supplied with the lathe. I couldn't find my square bar stock, so I decided to use one of the arms on the chuck key I made for my dividing head. The bar only needed about 0.020" shaving off to make it fit the 3-jaw chuck - and accuracy wasn't mad important, so I lobbed it at the vice & took very light (0.005") cuts with an end mill:



I invite you to count the number of errors/bad practices I'm indulging in here. I can think of at least three.

Anyway, managing to avoid launching lumps of metal across the shop, I milled down 3 sides by 0.015" each (who can't count? me?). The 4th side wasn't possible with the key in the bottom of the vice due to the right-angled bit. And it's slightly narrower than my parallels. A trial fit showed it was OK anyway, so I left the 4th side un-milled. This is the result:



Nasty, but it allowed me to chuck some bar into the lathe to have a little play.


Oh boy, now the learning begins....

I won't show the results of the first bar, because frankly it's dreadful. I managed to chip the carbide bit that was in place, and mounting a new tool will be a major pain in the posterior - a QCTP is definitely right near the top of the agenda. At first, it seemed that the lathe was in a massive hurry. Observe the chart below:



I wanted the slowest possible feed rate for either sliding or surfacing. 14 is the smallest number, so I set the gearbox accordingly. Banzai!!!  :bugeye: The carriage shoots off across the room, and it looks like I'm cutting a really naff thread. WTF??? Shurely this isn't right? I try facing the end of the bar & get a lovely spiral pattern. What's the deal here, do I need some uber-wide bit here? Have I made a massive mistake buying this lathe? I do recall that the minimum number of threads per inch was a comparatively low number. 28, in fact.


Hmm. 28tpi is all the way over the other side of the gearbox.


 :med:

 :smart:

I remember reading about this on Tony's lathes.co.uk site. Edgwick didn't quote their surfacing/sliding speeds in thousandths per revolution; they described it in cuts per inch! So I'd managed to pick the MAXIMUM speed of the lathe, instead of the minimum!

 :wack:

Adjusted over to 200 "cuts/inch", and got a MUCH better surface finish. Still rough as a bear's arse, but that's because I've chipped my carbide bit.  :hammer:

Oh, and when I clamped the bit in the chuck, I broke the (really really crappy) weld on my chuck key. So I can't get the bar out now.

Hey ho. Tomorrow I shall make a whole new chuck key. One that doesn't have welding on it.



That's all for now!
Cheers!
Ade.
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Offline AdeV

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Help! Need grinding wheels
« Reply #27 on: November 23, 2009, 06:56:05 PM »
Well, the machining practicing continues apace. No photos I'm afraid, because everything I've produced so far has either been garbage, or just a thinner bar than it was before I started  ::)

Lacking a thread cutting bit, I figured I could get away with using my carbide cutter, as the angles weren't a million miles out, and this was just a practice piece. As mentioned above, I'd chipped the cutter, but being indexable meant I had two good cutting faces left. Well, a couple of dig-ins later, I didn't have any cutting edges left.  :hammer: That'll teach me to use the wrong shaped bit incorrectly (I should have set the compound slide to 22.5 degrees & advanced that way, instead of trying to cut corners & use the cross slide). Lesson learned, but now i'm clean out of carbide cutting edges. Doh. Most of the other bits of tooling I've got are either HSS, or brazed carbide - all of the brazed tools have chips or dings.

So; I pick the best shaped piece of HSS I've got & free-hand grind it on the grinding wheel. It cuts OK, not the best finish on the planet, but I've probably not ground it too well; and the pointy bit cut theads just about well enough to screw into the Lister's exhaust pipe, which is what I wanted to try out.

As a result, I really need to find a suitable grinding wheel for my fancy Abwood grinder... so I can cut nice accurate angles without worrying about whether my freehand technique is any good or not (that can come later). I think I need 8" cup-type wheels (so I can grind on the face, rather than the edge), but can I find any? Not likely....

Anyone got any idea where I might get such a wheel? Or have I bought a lemon?
Cheers!
Ade.
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Offline trevoratxtal

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #28 on: November 24, 2009, 04:35:04 AM »
for large cup wheels Try
http://www.mscjlindustrial.co.uk/CGI/INSRHM
some times expensive but have a huge range,
If you find the item you are after google it to see if someone else does it cheaper.
  :wave:

Trev

Offline AdeV

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #29 on: November 24, 2009, 07:47:02 AM »
Thanks for the link Trev  :thumbup: Unfortunately, they don't seem to do any 8" cup-shaped wheels  :(

So, I've just gone & taken one of the steel wheels off & measured it.


 :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh:

It's 6"!

What an idiot.

I now need to find a 6" cup wheel with what appears to be a 2-5/8" hole for the hub. I suspect this will be a much easier task...
Cheers!
Ade.
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Offline AdeV

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #30 on: November 24, 2009, 05:09:58 PM »
Only one pic tonight: I've got one carbide tool that sits too high in the toolpost to cut on-centre (even when located in the lowest toolpost slot); so the only option is to reduce the height of the tool holder.

Here it is having 0.005" milled off the base using a shell mill:


Even after 3 trips to the mill, it's still just a sensation high, so I'll whip another 5 thou off it tomorrow. It cuts quite badly at the moment, presumably due to this issue.
Cheers!
Ade.
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Offline John Stevenson

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #31 on: November 24, 2009, 05:35:07 PM »
Thanks for the link Trev  :thumbup: Unfortunately, they don't seem to do any 8" cup-shaped wheels  :(

So, I've just gone & taken one of the steel wheels off & measured it.


 :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh: :doh:

It's 6"!

What an idiot.

I now need to find a 6" cup wheel with what appears to be a 2-5/8" hole for the hub. I suspect this will be a much easier task...


Yup just found a brand new 6" cup wheel, white ali-oxide for HSS tools.

John S.
John Stevenson

Offline trevoratxtal

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #32 on: November 26, 2009, 05:49:08 AM »
Hello John
I thought 8inch was on the big side but kept quiet, someone is bound to have used bigger.
Personal I have never come across any thing more than 4inch cup wheel and even that is ofttimes to big for some tool grinding.
I mostly use the diamond 3 inch cup wheels they seem to do the job well and do not need dressing.
Then I am a lazy b***r.
To my way of thinking, cup wheels have far more centrifugal stress than a similar standard wheel.
Trev 

Offline AdeV

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #33 on: November 28, 2009, 08:44:07 PM »
Today's task has been to clean and understand the taper turning attachment. Liberal doses of WD40, scrubbing with paper towels, rinse & repeat, and this is the result:



I was mainly concerned with the sliding bits, which is why it's not 100% spotless and sparkling

Here it's set up to do a 5 degree taper (not sure if that's 5 degree included angle, or 10 degree included; when I cut my first taper with it I'll know), with the fat end towards the headstock:


And 5 degrees the other way:


The markings go up to about 8 degrees in each direction.

It took me a while to suss out exactly how it works; partly because it was all stuck fast with grime, and partly because there's a bit missing... Specifically, the bit that locks the taper unit to the lathe bed. As it stands, the whole thing just travels along with the carriage, which is a bit useless when it comes to cutting tapers...

So:  :proj:

Along with the QCTP, cam-lock chuck system, morse spindle adapter, now I have the Taper Attachment Missing Piece Project. I can't see anything on the lathe, headstock or tailstock end, which looks suitable for locking the taper slide down. I even took a photo of the back end of the lathe to see if anything showed up under the flash. It didn't:



However, there's provision for a couple of screws in the bottom slide (you can just about see them in the photo), so I'm thinking a couple of bars coming back out of the taper unit, to some kind of clamp device. The thing is, I don't really want to modify the lathe if I don't have to (at least, not permanantly); although ultimately if I have to drill & tap into the tailstock end casting, then that's what I'll do. But... there's no sign of that being done, so presumably Edgwick had a better method.

Can any ex-Edgwick users remember how the taper unit is locked down, John S?  :wave:
Cheers!
Ade.
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Offline Davo J

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #34 on: November 28, 2009, 11:18:03 PM »
From what I have seen on other taper attachments, is that they attach to the ways with a clamp on unit. That way you can move it up and down the bed were ever you are working. The link below shows what they look like.
http://grizzly.com/products/Taper-Attachment-for-G4016-Gear-Head-Lathe/H0775
Dave

Offline John Stevenson

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #35 on: November 29, 2009, 06:05:52 AM »
My Edgewick never had the taper turning but two of my present lathes have, Ivan the Terrible, a Russian tool room lathe and my CVA.

Not sure what's on Ivan as it's buried [ literally ] but the CVA was also missing it's clamp so I made one very similar to the Grizzly one posted.
Works fine.

John S.
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Offline AdeV

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #36 on: November 29, 2009, 06:09:23 AM »
Thanks Dave, I do believe you're right.  :thumbup: That looks like the best option to me.

I should have thought of it myself really  :doh:  Obviously, my path to being a machinist is only just beginning....

John - you replied as I was writing the above... I need to go to the workshop now & check how much of that square edge of the ways are available to me. I can then do a c-o-c to check I'm not doing anything stupid.

Then it'll be Miller time :) Bridgeport, that is...
Cheers!
Ade.
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Offline Darren

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Re: The lathe arrives!
« Reply #37 on: November 29, 2009, 06:43:10 AM »


I should have thought of it myself really  :doh:  Obviously, my path to being a machinist is only just beginning....



Nobody can think of everything, hardly any of us  can come up with much at all. But what we are good at is looking at what has gone before us and adapting to our present requirements.

Machining and developed ideas have been going on far too long for one brains lifespan  :ddb:

I have a taper att, but it won't help you much as mine runs on it's own ways. Not that I'd have a clues as how to use it  :scratch:
You will find it a distinct help… if you know and look as if you know what you are doing. (IRS training manual)

Offline trevoratxtal

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« Last Edit: December 12, 2009, 06:19:05 AM by trevatxtal »