Author Topic: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"  (Read 77481 times)

Offline cidrontmg

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 229
  • Country: pt
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #125 on: May 29, 2010, 06:46:40 PM »
Hi MJH,
"sometimes work seems to insist on inserting its self into the day, and interfere with important things like model engineering."
I take that as meaning the bike frame is a customer job, not for yourself?
Immaculate work with the radial. Your skills and patience are way beyond anything I will ever achieve.   :clap:
Iīm very happy that I can still enjoy seeing how things should be done, with your (and many othersī) build logs. Intimidating, many times, but also challenging, and very educative. Being alone, without anyone to ask for advice or to offer encouragement is ok, if thatīs what has to be. But it sure is nice to watch other peopleīs solutions to problems, and just knowing that there really ARE other people there who are similarly affected, who want to machine metal, not for profit, but because itīs fun, is a consolation when people around you express doubts about your mental state  :)
Olli
Penafiel
Portugal

Offline madjackghengis

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 717
  • big engine
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #126 on: May 30, 2010, 12:17:00 PM »
Hi Cidrontmg, the frame is for an old friend, and I've gotten way behind, mostly because I stay way behind.  I really need to finish the frame really soon, just as a personal obligation but there is no end to little things that have to be done "right now", and I'm about the only one around who works on old motorcycles or really old machinery that's used for work and not play, so I get overwhelmed sometimes.  As to what you will achieve, I can only say I never thought I'd be doing what I'm doing now, even twenty years ago, much less forty, when I first started thinking about forever.  What you say about build logs and watching others is my primary means of entering the field, I'm trained in electronics and I'm good at it, but it is something I loathe doing because there's no room for an engine in a radio or radar set.  I think if you dropped me on a deserted island somewhere, all alone, I'd have a lathe built in a bit, a furnace of some sort, and would be machining what ever was available for stock.  I feel sorry for people who don't love what they do so much they resent having to eat and sleep because it takes away from work, they are definitely missing out in my book.  They can question my mental state, but I can question their qualifications for having a question.  Part of my personal faith is the fact I can't live without creating something, which suggests I was created to create, at least in my mind.  As I see it, if you don't LOVE life, you need to go back to where ever it was you lost that love, and figure out how to get it back, and then do it.  When you look at all the great things you can see on forums like this, we are surrounded by people like us who do love life. :nrocks: :ddb: :lol:  mad jack

Offline ieezitin

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 662
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #127 on: May 30, 2010, 01:23:14 PM »
Holy flying chicken feet batman!!! What a fit!

I have welded 1500lbs Extra heavy wall chrome molly high pressure steam piping in nuclear power plants and never had a fit given to me as close as that!!.

You tell your biker buddy his ass is resting on a billion dollar frame.

To my knowledge the navy is the only outfit equipped with a purpose built pipe contour bevel machine for prepping pipe on nuke subs, which is mandatory on all gas & fluid systems on the vessel.

You struck a nerve with me on the topic of loving or hating what you do for a living, I emigrated here to the states back in 1990 and I applied for a machinists job and the guy gave me the position for $9.50 an hour!. I nearly faced punched the guy for the insult.

I next applied for a job at a local mechanical contractor and was asked if I welded and I said yes, he asked if I could pipe weld and I replied yes but prefer not to because I drives me insane, anyways I got the job and my pay shot up to  $27.75an hour. 20 years later I still pipe weld and hate every inch of weld I lay but I make a fortune at it. My real passion is machining that’s what I apprenticed for so I had to build my own shop and stuff it full of goodies to satisfy my desires, I just wish machining paid better then I would be in heaven.

But heaven is 50 feet from my house, I even got a little refrigerator installed the other day it holds a 30 pack nice and snug, my wife told me yesterday she is going to wally Mart and buying me a little trash can for the empties and it will rest next to the fridge. :beer:

Your build on this engine is superb sir!. Your techniques and approaches to solving problems are a great source of learning to all fledgling machinists, ive been doing this for 30 years and learned a couple of neat tricks you have shown in your posts, especially the grease gun while tapping small holes. :clap:


Keep being sane Jack!.   :headbang:             Anthony
If you cant fix it, get another hobby.

Offline madjackghengis

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 717
  • big engine
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #128 on: May 31, 2010, 11:13:19 AM »
To ieezitin, I have been welding up custom frames for about twenty years, ever since I bought a decent mig welder, and had the shop to do it in.  I was not happy with the quality nor the choices offered in "custom" frames, and I've welded up too many repairs in stock frames, so there had to be a third choice when I finished raising my children, and got back to building bikes, engines, and the like.  I've gone through many changes, two previous designs of tubing benders, different tube and many methods of making things fit.  Grinding will get you close enough, but machining gets you right on.  Grinding takes just as long, and the test fits always piss you off.  Becky, my biker buddy, knows she's getting a great frame because she wanted mine, and I told her I'd build her a duplicate, but mine's not for sale.
   For twenty years, I worked when I could where I could doing what ever I could get for outside work, while I served in the Marine Corps.  I was medically retired due to the onset of Multiple Sclerosis in 97, but had served some four years with it before it got bad enough I couldn't lead from the front, so I had plenty of time to get ready to be retired out.  My wife and I bought our "farm", about sixty acres out in the country, the shop is about fifty feet from the house, and I walk to work every day.  I barely make enough to cover the electric and other "costs" of running the shop, but I can't sit, there's things I want but can't buy, and there's jobs to be done no one else wants to do, mainly repairs to old and antique machinery, being used still, because that's what's around, and I like fixing things.  The best part about this forum is that I get to watch what other people love to do, and thus do a great job at it, and see and learn, and I get to share my own trials and tribulations, taking the hints and ideas I get, and improving my tool kit as I go.  As I see it, if you can't learn something every day, you're not trying.  Being better than yourself tomorrow than you are today is the best way to build a good perspective of yourself, and gives you a challenge you can fulfill each and every day pretty much, and people who know they know how to do things are generally happy people.  I've done pretty much the same thing my whole life because there's never an end to broken old things that people want back because the new replacements aren't as good.  The pay's not great, but the people are, I make a living, and I'm happy, they're happy, the taxman is happy, and I sometimes even get to town more than once in a month.
    In working on the oil pump body for the engine, I ran into a small snag.  The sump pump, which extracts the used oil and returns it to the tank via a filter, went fine, with little problem as the inlet is a groove "routed" with an 1/8 in end mill on the working face of the pump body, which goes against the rear main bearing, and the outlet goes out through the side of the pump body, through a matching hole in the crank case, and returns to the oil tank.  The pressure oil pump, which takes oil from the tank and feeds it in to the rear main bearing, through passages in the crankshaft, oiling the master rod directly, and the slave rods with spray flung by the crank, then on to the front main bearing, after which it seeps out into the front gear cavity where the gear train driving the cam are housed.
   To get the pressure fed oil to the crank, I drilled an 1/8th inch hole through from the outside of the pump housing, aligned across the middle of the pump its self, and through the body in, where it will guide the drill to open a hole in the side of the rear main bearing, and thus apply the pressure to that bearing, and thus all the way through the oil system as described.  The problem is the hole to feed the pressure pump should be going under the pump cavity, with a hole drilled to connect it to the inlet side of the cavity, a hole connecting it to the output side, and with the quarter inch or so of space under the cavity, blocked off after drilling the hole in the bearing, to separate the gravity feed to the pump, from the pressure output which should be going to the bearing.  In following the design drawings, I found that I ended up drilling the 1/8th inch hole with perhaps .025 of the hole penetrating the gear cavity, allowing pressure oil to flow back to the inlet side without ever leaving the pump, via the slot in the gear cavity.  I should have done the math, simply subtracting the depth of the gear cavity (.188) from the total thickness of the pump body (.468), and calculating the stated entry point on the side of the body, which would have led me to see the drill would end up through the gear cavity.  The eighth inch oil port is counter bored for a quarter 28 thread for the oil fitting and I could have kept the counter bore on center of the body, and drilled the 1/8 in port off center in the counterbore, allowing it to pass under the gear cavity, and putting a plug directly under the gear cavity, held in with loctite, to separate the inlet from the pressure feed outlet, but this is all consideration after the fact.  I have two choices, and the first does not eliminate the second.  First, since the pump body is line reamed with the rear main bearing, I can attempt to fix it by putting a piece of 1/8th inch aluminum rod in the drilled hole where it penetrates the gear cavity, weld a quarter inch piece in place, blocking inlet from outlet, and milling the weld down to the bottom of the gear cavity.  If I can do that without distorting the pump body, it will be the best answer, I think.  The other choice is to turn a new blank pump body, set it up as the first one was with the rear main bearing, and do my best to align ream the shaft holes in the new pump body without distorting the reamed holes in the rear main bearing, and from there, taking lessons learned, and getting the pump feed passage beneath the gear cavity and thus only needing plugging.  The key issue is not distorting the reamed holes in the rear bearing, as that chunk of bearing bronze was about fifty bucks, and I don't want to buy another chunk, and make a new rear main bearing.

using an 1/8th in ball mill to mill the inlet passage for the pressure pump feed

using the same cutter to mill the pressure pump output port to provide pressure to the rear main bearing, note the long groove machined on the left side angled slightly from the center at its base, to the scavenge pump cavity at the top of the groove, this is milled with an 1/8th in ball mill, to intersect with the passage from the oil sump

drilling the 1/8 inch port feeding the scavenge pump, this port will intersect the groove milled in the face of the pump body leading to the scavenge pump.

counterboring the oil feed for 1/4-28 infeed oil fitting, this is counter bored at 5/16ths .032 deep for a sealing o-ring between pump body and crank case, the 1/8th inch hole has been drilled through to the center hole which slips over the rear main bearing, and this hole will guide drilling the oil hole in the main bearing allowing pressure to flow through the crankshaft feeding all the bearings and gears

the working face of the pump body, with the gear cavities showing.  Note the groove in the middle of the gear cavity on the right, this is where the feed drilling broke into the gear cavity and needs resolution.

another picture of the pump working face with the pump cavities showing.

a close up showing the pump gear cavities with the scavenge on the left, with the angled slot feeding it, the pressure pump gear cavity on the right, note the groove across the middle of the gear cavity, this cannot remain and the pump move oil.

picture of the scavenge pump up close, with the feed groove visible, and the hole for the outfeed visible on the left edge of the cavity centered on the side, this intersects with a drilled passage from the left edge of the pump body which is also counterbored for an o-ring, to seal against the crankcase when the pump and main bearing are in place.

showing the whole of the unfinished pump body, with the feed groove of the scavenger pump seen leading to the pump cavity, and the bottom end of the groove having a hole connecting it to the drilled passage that comes up from the bottom edge of the pump body.  This picture shows the unwanted groove in the feed pump clearly, on the right side.  When the pump body is finished, most of the metal will be gone, with it being approximately "T" shaped, scavenging up through the vertical of the "T", pumping used oil out, through the left arm of the "T", to a filter to the external tank, and taking in fresh oil through the right hand arm of the "T", and pressure feeding it through the rear main bearing, through the crankshaft, to all the bearings and the gears to fall to the sump and be cycled through again.  I expect the fix of welding up a plug for the groove to work otherwise I will be machining a new body out of new material, with a different "take" on the feed intake oil passage, one not requiring welding up the body hopefully.  This may appear a setback, but no project moves to completion without glitches, and this is really a rather minor one and just a slight pain, not a worry.  I'm looking to see the end of this little aspect hopefully today.  Ta Ta for now,  :ddb: :nrocks: :headbang: mad jack

Offline ieezitin

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 662
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #129 on: May 31, 2010, 12:20:12 PM »
Oh lord.

We must be lost brothers from time long ago. I too own a 10 acre farm here in Maryland, I too am the go to guy for repairs for farmers, dump truck operators builders and such. I don’t set the world on fire making a living at it but we too scrape buy, god provides just enough for what we need.

Our kids have gone and in the last year I have become a little insular and just want to tinker and fiddle in my shops and never leave the homestead so my local community supplies all my needs, bale spears, snow ploughs, manure spreaders, tractors and combines are now my life, I just machined up and made a whole new power take off for a Massey Ferguson 1952 hydraulic pump, the owner was going to be charged around $1000 for the set up my charge was $250 and a 30 pack of Natti Ice. Whata deal uh!. But I never had to hit I95 and risk getting killed by some flaky tart applying make up while talking and texting on her $250 a month phone contract. Plus I had the added pleasure of company from my faithful pit bull who loves to sit and watch me work.

Jack I feel we are both the same in nature and motivated by the same things, its great and a pleasure coupled by being honored to know you.

Here is my Sanctuary from 2000ft.




Here is some links from past builds
http://s721.photobucket.com/albums/ww212/ieezitin/John%20Deer%20Bale%20Spear%20Crush%20bar/

http://s721.photobucket.com/albums/ww212/ieezitin/tractor%20pull%20project/

Here is my machine shop
http://s721.photobucket.com/albums/ww212/ieezitin/Machine%20shop/The%20Machine%20shop/
If you cant fix it, get another hobby.

Offline madjackghengis

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 717
  • big engine
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #130 on: June 01, 2010, 07:21:03 PM »
Hi brother tool makers, I wanted to say how hard it is not to fill this log with personal comments since so many people comment and they are all interesting, unique, instructive, all in all, very hard not to simply go on and on with the dialog, but this is supposed to be a build log so I do try to keep the commentary brief although it might not seem like it.  Among the things that had to be done, is to drill and ream out the four gears which comprise the two pumps, as they come with an eighth inch bore and need to be three sixteenths, to fit.  The plans called for two different "jigs", each a piece of aluminum round stock with a hole bored and slot cut to clamp the two different size gears in the three jaw, and do the job in the lathe.  I ran into my 5C collet rack, and realised I could do two gears in the 7/16th collet, and two in the 1/2 in collet, so I put the first collet in a square block, with the gear held tight with a knurled nut holding the collet in, clamped the block in my mill vise vertically, using a good square and put an eighth inch pin in the first gear bore and centered the spindle over the pin.


from there, I drilled a .180 through the gear and followed with the .1875 reamer.
 
  Yesterday, while waiting for someone coming over, I turned a piece of aluminum rod down to an eighth inch for about a half inch, the cut off a piece about a quarter of an inch long, pushed it through the feed hole until it was centered in the space where there wasn't supposed to be a space, and managed to tig weld it in place with only a bit of melting of nearby sharp edges.  With a nice sharp quarter inch end mill, I put the pump body in the vice on parallels, nicely hammered down on them snug, brought the tip of the mill, not running, to the bottom of the other pump cavity and zeroed my z axis.  I then put the cutter in the cavity with the large (comparatively) lump of aluminum in the middle, kind of like a dump truck backed up to the cavity and dumped a load, and proceeded to take the lump down to half a thousandth off zero, and then twiddle the X and Y feed handles until the bottom of the cavity looked pretty much clear of all the weld that had been sticking up.

one view of the cleaned up cavity

and one more of the cavity

I ordered a lump of 4140 heat treated an inch long and three and a quarter inches in diameter after finding out an inch cost exactly the same as half an inch, so when it showed up today with the man in the brown truck, I put Joe, my hacksaw man on to cutting the lump in half, since that's all I need for the cam.

He's pretty reliable, gets a bit off track now and then, but just put a bit of cutting oil in the cut ever once in a while, and he'll get the job done.

He's about done, and I'll have a spare piece of steel as well as the piece for the cam.  Well, that's about all I got done in the last day or so, Rob, I'll be milling the back bone of the frame for the neck, so I'll post pictures of how I do it, that's to get the neck nice a plumb with the frame.  Those are not Suzuki wheels, they're off Buell's, and are going to end up on something or another, I just haven't figured out what yet.  I've got one, a seventeen, going on the back of a custom bike I'm building, but haven't a clue on the ones you see at least not yet.
    Ieezitin, I haven't got to look at your photos yet, but I will, and send you an e-mail, the arial view is absolutely gorgeous, I like that shade of green, and like being surrounded by it.  I tried to post something this morning, but I must have rushed it, getting out for my monthly infusion at the doctor, and it didn't post.  I'd call it brothers of a different mother, myself.  Life goes a lot better if you're pro-active and flexible.  I expect we'll be conversing more as time goes on.  ttfn, mad jack the Irishman, out in the noonday sun :ddb: :lol:


Offline Mad_Grasshopper

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 7
  • Faceting Machine
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #131 on: August 14, 2010, 03:45:10 PM »
Greetings all,

I have known Jack for about 13 years. There is not a time I have left his workshop without having learned something new. There are ALWAYS interesting projects to see. Even the lounge chair in his shop is an interesting story.

I remember a few years ago when jack showed me the magazine ad for plans of this engine. I had been discussing my self-study of WWII radial engine vibration with him. I considered the model an incredibly interesting but daunting project. He told me he was going to make one one day.

Boy, was I blown away when I first laid eyes on that crank case! Amazing work.  :bugeye:

Regards,
Jamie

Offline dsquire

  • In Memoriam
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2275
  • Country: ca
  • Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #132 on: August 14, 2010, 04:59:27 PM »
Greetings all,

I have known Jack for about 13 years. There is not a time I have left his workshop without having learned something new. There are ALWAYS interesting projects to see. Even the lounge chair in his shop is an interesting story.

I remember a few years ago when jack showed me the magazine ad for plans of this engine. I had been discussing my self-study of WWII radial engine vibration with him. I considered the model an incredibly interesting but daunting project. He told me he was going to make one one day.

Boy, was I blown away when I first laid eyes on that crank case! Amazing work.  :bugeye:

Regards,
Jamie

Jamie

Welcome to MadModder. I haven't known Jack near as long as you but I look forward to reading every post that he makes as there is always something to learn in each one.

I would like to invite you to start a new post in the "Introductions" thread and tell us a bit about yourself. Looking forward to hearing more from you.  :D :D

Cheers  :beer:

Don

Good, better, best.
Never let it rest,
'til your good is better,
and your better best

Offline madjackghengis

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 717
  • big engine
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #133 on: August 15, 2010, 08:40:05 AM »
Well, for those who have been so graciously following this log, and are probably impatient with me now, with my flame sucker engine running, I will be getting back to the main job at hand, this here radial.  I am waiting on getting the cylinders back, I gave them to an automotive machine shop to be "pin honed" for better accuracy, they're charging me two bucks a hole, so I can't touch that in time, and with their machine the rings break in straight away, and the cylinders are straight with the bores being round and straight within about a tenth of a thousandth.  I've got 2021 aluminum stock for the pistons, arrived last week, and some bearing bronze stock to turn for lifter bearings, and I've got the cam blank machined out round, and set up on the rotary table, and just got in the woodruff key cutter to be used to cut the cam lumps, or rather leave the lumps high, and cut the valleys, so next step is either shafts for the oil pumps, and oil pump testing, or milling the cam so it has lobes.  I should get the cylinders back next week or so, and start on pistons, as each cylinder will be unique I expect, as far as finished bore.  I don't even want to think about what comes after that, too much thinking.  Jamie has been a willing accolyte for lots of years and has added much to my shop, as he's a sheet metal worker, on C-130's, and has brought sheet metal into my shop, and taught me more than a little bit about that separate subject.  His "study" of radial engine vibrations" was about a fifty page review of Pratt and Whitney's work in bringing a four bank radial engine into a reliable working engine for the bombers and eventually the freight and passenger aircraft.  I learned most of what I know about crank harmonics and the art of crank balancing from his printed copy of Pratt and Whitney's review, and our mutual discussions of the meaning of the details in that analysis.  I suspect you will see Jamie's work on this forum before too long.  He's left the Corps to go to school, and get his credentials as an engineer with lots of background experience.  A close friend and top notch mechanic and metal worker I look forward to seeing what he ends up producing when he's ready to show his paces.  He's got a few tales of his own to tell worth listening to.  I'm happy to have such good friends as he.
   This thread will be alive again and the progress moving forward, haven't gone a day without looking at it and waiting on tooling, material, and of course, getting an old failure running, as I should have long ago. :nrocks: and the folks on it are always ready to  :poke: you when you need one.  Top notch gang to hang out with. mad jack

Offline Artie

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 293
  • Country: au
  • Down here in the Aussie sunshine/heat :-)
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #134 on: August 20, 2010, 08:24:57 PM »
Gday mate..updates? Following this one with much interest....... im off now to make chips on my marine twin...... cheers Rob T  :poke: :poke: :poke:
South Wales, wait...NEW South Wales... Batemans Bay.

Offline sbwhart

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3522
  • Country: gb
  • Smile, Be Happy, Have Fun and Rock Until you Drop
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #135 on: August 21, 2010, 01:06:06 AM »
I'm Quietly watching this Jack

I've always bin fascinated by radial engines.

I really like that that power saw thats one bit of kit I badly need.

Stew
A little bit of clearance never got in the road
 :wave:

Location:- Crewe Cheshire

Offline madjackghengis

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 717
  • big engine
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #136 on: August 21, 2010, 09:17:39 AM »
Hi Stew, I inherited that when the man who made it passed on, and I named it after him, he must have used it thirty or forty years before I got it fifteen or so ago.  I just ran across a set of plans for a power hacksaw using a pair of connecting rods from an auto engine, to give the vertical movement necessary, and at the same time keep the bar carrying the saw frame aligned, I think its in the tools section of the forum.  "Joe" is a bit loose, and needs to be set right, and watched for the first couple strokes, and some cutting oil added on occasion, but he cuts very efficiently, and rather straight, the cut shown is splitting a one inch piece of pre-heat treated 4140 in half, and the finished results gave me two useable pieces, one for the cams of the radial, the other for when I screw up the cams for the radial.  I've got one of the never ending four by six chinese band saws, and while it's done yeoman's service, being almost twenty five and still cutting, it's giving out signs it may be near the end of its life.  I had to spend about four or five hours fixing the bearings in place in their bores, and getting the shafts fixed, when it was brand new, as they used no snap rings, or set screws and didn't leave any room for the same, but 680 locktite has held it unmoving ever since, and all that I've done for it otherwise, is weld the blade guide plates back on their arms, and make them actually straight instead of slightly angled as they were with only one tack, as original.  I sawed an anvil out of a piece of regulation railroad track once, about eighteen hours of hacksawing, a pack of a dozen cheap blades, done in by the first hour, and one Sandvik blade finishing the job and still sharp at the end of it, but I wouldn't want to ever do that again.  The big deal with a power hacksaw is getting the direction of rotation of the final gear or sprocket right, and getting the link placed right, so it tends to lift the blade on the return stroke, and pull down on it during the cutting stroke.  My hacksaw took forever to cut until I figured out it was running backwards, and lifting on the cut stroke.  Cheers  :nrocks: mad jack

Offline AdeV

  • Madmodder Committee
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2233
  • Country: gb
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #137 on: August 25, 2010, 07:25:48 AM »
Jack -

Although I've looked in on this thread occasionally, I must have accidentally missed big chunks of it. I just spent the morning re-reading the whole thing from start to finish - and I have to say just one word:

Wow! Amazing work, just fabulous....

OK, 5 words....

I love the way you can see the parts in the raw stock. I've looked at your oil pump over & over again & I just can't figure out how it works.... but I know it will, and that it'll be absolutely bob-on when it does.

 :nrocks:
Cheers!
Ade.
--
Location: Wallasey, Merseyside. A long way from anywhere.
Or: Zhengzhou, China. An even longer way from anywhere...
Skype: adev73

Offline Artie

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 293
  • Country: au
  • Down here in the Aussie sunshine/heat :-)
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #138 on: August 25, 2010, 07:28:46 AM »
So, no updates?
South Wales, wait...NEW South Wales... Batemans Bay.

Online Brass_Machine

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5281
  • Country: us
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #139 on: August 25, 2010, 10:17:34 PM »
Nice job! Love the frame work. You shoudl start a seperate thread for the custom bike work...

Gotta wipe the drool off the my laptop.

Eric
Science is fun.

We're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.

Offline madjackghengis

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 717
  • big engine
Re: a nine cylinder radial engine, plans by "ageless engines"
« Reply #140 on: August 26, 2010, 09:30:00 AM »
Hi all, I know how frustrating when a thread goes quiet, but rest assured it will be moving again shortly.  I have my cylinders being "pin honed", at an automotive machine shop, at two bucks a hole for eleven cylinders, and being able to achieve a finish I can only envy, I chose to use them, rather than work with my own taper and oval holes, so I'm waiting for their return.  I just got the cutter I needed to cut the cam lobes on the cam without having to flip it over to machine the second cam, and have to re-align zero, and work the rotary table and the y axis backwards, for having flipped the cam.  The cutter is a regular woodruff key cutter, which allows me to cut both cams, even though there is only about fifty thousandths of separation between the two, and I'm to use one degree angle changes while moving the y axis to generate the actual cam lobes.  I kept an extra piece of the pre-heat treated 4140 I'm using for the cam blank so I can make the good cam after I screw up the first one.
     With regard to the motorcycle frame, as soon as I get back to that project, which is right after I finish with the engine swap in my lawn mower, and intermingled with the radial engine, I will separate it, and put it in its own log.  I also have a frame I'm building for myself which is far more interesting, because you can do more interesting things when you have no concerns about liability.
    With about seven acres of "lawn" out front, lawnmowers are a high priority for us, and I spend much time and work keeping the several different sorts needed, running and keeping spindle bearings in them.  We live right on a creek, and have to deal with stumps and other such things, including wetlands, and working right up to the edge without falling over and in.  I generally have at least three different types of lawn tractors I'm maintaining at any given time, and one is always either "down", or about to go down, usually for worn and then broken parts if I don't catch it in time.
    I expect the cylinders back home any day now, and will start on pistons for each, once they come home, but will get on with the cam, and finishing up the oil pumps as soon as I can.  (that break taking my old flame sucker that never ran, and getting it running didn't help the time table any, but it sure helped my ego and piece of mind a lot).  With a bit of luck I should have some good pictures to post in the next day or two, and get moving forward.  I can't express my full appreciation for all the interest shown, and the ample encouragement.  More soon :headbang: mad jack