Author Topic: storing change wheels  (Read 6275 times)

Offline wheeltapper

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storing change wheels
« on: July 20, 2010, 03:39:11 PM »
this is one of the best ideas I've seen in Model Engineers Workshop mag.


basically sheets of chipboard with half circles bolted together.
so much better than a tower.

Roy
I used to be confused, now I just don't know.

Rob.Wilson

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Re: storing change wheels
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2010, 01:38:36 PM »
Hi Roy

Nice one  :clap: :clap: :clap: ,,,,,,,, me thinks i will have to make one a few  :dremel:

Thanks for showing Rob

Offline Tinkering_Guy

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Re: storing change wheels
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2010, 03:17:51 PM »
How did he make the slots? Or are they pieces of chipboard with saddles cut in 'em, and separated/joined by thin bits of wood?

Please tell me he didn't use the gears as keyseat cutters to make their own slots.  :bugeye:
Tinkering_Guy
Hobbyist machinist, electron-pusher, software dude, and experimental chemist

Offline wheeltapper

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Re: storing change wheels
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2010, 04:06:01 PM »
right first time, chipboard with half circles separated by hardboard.

using the gears as cutters eh, now why didn't I think of that  :lol: :lol:

Roy
I used to be confused, now I just don't know.

Offline fatal-exception

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Re: storing change wheels
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2010, 01:41:57 PM »
That's a fantastic idea. Thanks for posting...now off to model up my change gears in Solidworks....

Paul

Offline RichardShute

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Re: storing change wheels
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2010, 09:34:06 AM »
Here's one I made a couple of years ago. Two differences, I used plywood as it's much less prone to absorbing moisture and the pockets are rectangular in section with back stops so that the gears are just under flush at the front, not halfway out. I put 1/4in dowels across the bottom of each pocket located so that the gear almost rests against the dowel when touching the back of the pocket. It is so that the gears don't just roll out. The advantages are that the box stands up and thus keeps the crap from falling into the box and you can even put a door on the front and it's obviously less footprint area. There's just room for it to stand in the lathe cabinet.



I also built a mini 'cabinet within a cabinet' into the side/end behind the small gears which has a small door and is sized to exactly accommodate the two extra changewheel studs that are part of the whole set. If I were doing it again I would balance the pocket heights for the small gears a bit better - the second version is always better.

This example is built into the base of the machine by the manufacturer (Smart & Brown Model M):


That way round there's no chance of them rolling out...

Richard
For every fool-proof solution, there is a fool greater than the proof

Offline Spurry

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Re: storing change wheels
« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2010, 07:16:35 PM »
My version for Harrison M250 wheels.

Pete


Offline John Rudd

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Re: storing change wheels
« Reply #7 on: October 07, 2010, 04:42:13 AM »
Hi Pete, (its Chippie btw...)

Nice looking storage rack..
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Location:  Backworth Newcastle

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Offline Spurry

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Re: storing change wheels
« Reply #8 on: October 07, 2010, 08:42:11 AM »
Hi John

Thanks for comments.

There's certainly some star machinerists round here. Trouble is I'm not getting much done, reading all the interesting posts.

Pete