Author Topic: An old bandsaw  (Read 5669 times)

Offline johnny123

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An old bandsaw
« on: August 10, 2010, 08:46:38 PM »
hello all
Made a new post in machine shop with no replies. Anyone know the details of my soon to be metal saw? :poke:

Offline dsquire

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Re: An old bandsaw
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2010, 02:51:30 PM »
johnny123

I can't help a whole lot with your saw other than to say that the "Power King" label was just one of many that was applied to these saws. It was probably made in Taiwan back in the '70s or '80s, maybe even before. The fact that it has 3 wheels on it allows a deeper cutting depth than a 2 wheel band saw. Because of this shorter blade life can be expected because of the sharper bending as it goes over the smaller wheels.

For blades you might find ready made ones at Lowes, Home Depot or Rhona. You could check the yellow pages for saw sharpening shops as many times they have bulk band saw blades and will weld them up for you to what ever size you need.

If you haven't purchased this saw yet you might want to wait until you can find out more about it. Are any other parts required? Spare parts will be hard to find.

Hope that this helps John.  :D :D

Cheers  :beer:

Don

Good, better, best.
Never let it rest,
'til your good is better,
and your better best

Offline Brass_Machine

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Re: An old bandsaw
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2010, 03:07:07 PM »
It has a cool retro style to it I like. Can't say I know anything about it though. Would be a fun project to restore I would think.

Eric
Science is fun.

We're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.

Offline johnny123

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Re: An old bandsaw
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2010, 09:18:23 PM »
I did buy the old machine for $20. It needs tlc and new guide bearings for the back of the blade. Plans are to add roller bearings to guide the blade both above and below the table. Not sure why, but how is the blade life reduced because of a third wheel? I always blamed blade life on quality and heat.

Offline Brass_Machine

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Re: An old bandsaw
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2010, 09:25:18 PM »
Jeez... only $20?? Nice find.

I think what Don is talking about (correct me if I am wrong, Don) is that the third wheel is smaller than the other 2. This makes the blade curve in a smaller diameter. Yes you are right about the quality and heat being issues as well... I know that with a motorcycle, it is better to make your gearing adjustments to the rear sprocket instead of the front. The rear being larger and the front being smaller. The idea is that the smaller radius the chain travels around the front sprocket places more wear on it (when you go with a smaller front sprocket).

Anyway... again $20?? why can't I find stuff like that?

Eric
Science is fun.

We're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.

Offline johnny123

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Re: An old bandsaw
« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2010, 09:59:23 PM »
I want to find my next lathe the same way.....just needs a lil tlc. The wheels are all the same size 6''. I found some  close looking 1940's saws sold by other names but nothing more. It is in pretty good shape for rebuilding.

Offline dsquire

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Re: An old bandsaw
« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2010, 11:14:05 PM »
johnny123

Eric basically has it right what I was referring to as far as wheel diameter. The smaller the diameter the wheels are, the greater the stress placed on the blade as it straightens then bends in a never ending cycle.

At one time I had a 14" band saw and I had some 3/4" wide blades made up for it (previously the widest was 1/2") to make it better for re sawing lumber. I could 't get any decent life out of the blades because they were thicker than the 1/2" blades and were being flexed too much on the 14" wheels. On a 18" or 20" band saw they would have been OK.  :D

Cheers  :beer:

Don

Good, better, best.
Never let it rest,
'til your good is better,
and your better best

Offline johnny123

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Re: An old bandsaw
« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2010, 07:36:37 PM »
hello

The saw is not made in Taiwan,rather by Warsaw ind. USA, Made in USA. That is what is on the power king label. Think you might be confused with King power tools Don? I think it will make a nice little aluminum/brass saw when slowed down with bearing guides both upper and lower the table.

Offline dsquire

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Re: An old bandsaw
« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2010, 09:05:18 PM »
hello

The saw is not made in Taiwan,rather by Warsaw ind. USA, Made in USA. That is what is on the power king label. Think you might be confused with King power tools Don? I think it will make a nice little aluminum/brass saw when slowed down with bearing guides both upper and lower the table.

Your right Johnny, I saw King and figured that is what it was. I wish you well with getting it fixed up and running. I'll be watching for some pictures as you progress.  :D :D

Cheers  :beer:

Don

Good, better, best.
Never let it rest,
'til your good is better,
and your better best

Offline madjackghengis

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Re: An old bandsaw
« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2010, 08:43:12 AM »
Johnny, while you might find it a problem with blade life, you are far more likely to find it a useful accessory and just learn to live with what you get for blades.  Don't forget that you can always make a blade clamp jig and silver braze your own blades, out of band saw stock, so don't worry about length.  I've got one similar, but all fiber filled plastic for a "body" and use it pretty much exclusively for wood and aluminum, as it doesn't have the power to cut through steel at the speed it needs to be at.  It does a bang up job getting through thin aluminum and wood fast and accurately.  If you end up brazing blades up, make sure the lap of the scarf is so the outside edge is trailing, and not leading, for blade life. :poke: mad jack

Offline Rog02

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Re: An old bandsaw
« Reply #10 on: August 20, 2010, 07:18:49 PM »
hello

The saw is not made in Taiwan,rather by Warsaw ind. USA, Made in USA. That is what is on the power king label. Think you might be confused with King power tools Don? I think it will make a nice little aluminum/brass saw when slowed down with bearing guides both upper and lower the table.

Hi Johnny:

I saw your post.  Try over at the Old Wood working Machines site for a bit of history on the Power King.  www.owwm.com

The company does show up in the records there but has been bought out and merged with Atlas and on down the line.  At one time I think those may have been retailed by Montgomery Wards, but that is just a guess. 

As far as bearing guides?  I don't think I would bother.  The guide blocks are available from wood working supply houses and actually give a wider support and anti-twisting action than a bearing.  I could see retrofitting a rolling rear support bearing but the blocks should be fine for the sides.

Roger
Old, Tired, and Grumpy

BTW, you realize that you stole that thing for $20 don't you?  In the vernacular of the OWWM bunch  "You Suck!" (and that's a good thing)
Roger
I'm OLD, I'm TIRED, and I'M GRUMPY!