Author Topic: Grades of brass  (Read 19428 times)

Offline DavidA

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Re: Grades of brass
« Reply #25 on: January 17, 2011, 03:31:06 PM »
Ade,

Afraid not.
 Just Harold keeping abreast of the name game.

Dave. :D

P.S.  en1a, also known as 230m07. a low carbon mild steel, free cutting, suitable for machining using both automatic and cnc machines.

Offline 1hand

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Re: Grades of brass
« Reply #26 on: January 17, 2011, 05:23:37 PM »
Thanks guys!

I took a chance on my first scrappy bought unknown!


Offline bry1975

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Re: Grades of brass
« Reply #27 on: January 17, 2011, 05:26:36 PM »
Very true Steel and Aluminium or Aluminum thermal properties are very different


Aluminium/Aluminum thermal conductivity 75-235 W m−1 K−1 and  thermal conductivity for steel has values in the range 10-55 W m−1 K.


Stainless steel generally conducts 1/3 that of plain steel.


Lew so are you a fan of Industrial press literature like machinerys handbook etc etc?


Bry
« Last Edit: January 17, 2011, 05:29:10 PM by bry1975 »

Offline Lew_Merrick_PE

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Re: Grades of brass
« Reply #28 on: January 18, 2011, 12:14:14 PM »
Lew so are you a fan of Industrial press literature like machinerys handbook etc etc?

It's not so much that I am a "fan" of Industrial Press as it is that I am a huge fan of Franklin Jones.  I had the great experience of sitting between Frank Jones and Leroy Grumman at an ASME dinner in New York City many years ago.  Frank signed my third edition of Machinery's Handbook.  I believe that I have a copy of every book he ever authored -- and a fair collection of the articles he wrote.

Industrial press has changed since Frank Jones died.  His (Frank's) rule was that the basic edition of Machinery's Handbook was to sell for no more than four hours of apprentice's wages.  A quick look at the cost today will tell you how far away from that ideal things have gotten.  My first copy cost me 5.5 hours of wages in 1967 -- but I also bought the onionskin paper, thumb-tabbed, leather bound version.  It was just starting to wear in very nicely in 1974 when it fell into a tracer mill's hydraulic sump.

My "design library" runs to (about) 700 feet of bookshelf.  I have a solid 4 feet dedicated to machining-specific texts.  I have many of the WWII vintage "How to Run..." texts for lathes, milling machines, jig borers, and various types of grinders.  I also have everything I could track down written by: Den Hertog, Carlo Castigliano, Lionel Marks, and Joseph Shigley -- as well as hundreds of other less-well-known authors on the subjects of mechanics, engineering, and technology.  Yeah, I am an information junkie.

Offline bry1975

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Re: Grades of brass
« Reply #29 on: January 18, 2011, 02:11:51 PM »
Very impressive certainly like your technical info.

Ebay must make a small fortune with all them old machinerys handbooks plus all the others.

Bry

Offline Lew_Merrick_PE

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Re: Grades of brass
« Reply #30 on: January 19, 2011, 12:34:04 PM »
Bry,  -- Going WAY off topic --  There was an Isaac Asimov story about an engineer who leapt from a burning building with his Handbook of Robotics and only wearing his underpants.  Had the timing been "tighter," he would have foregone his underpants.

I have tried to start lists based on this theory several times over the years.  You are in a burning building.  You have the choice of pants (under or otherwise) or grabbing a book before you leap out the window.  What book do you grab?

Offline Ned Ludd

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Re: Grades of brass
« Reply #31 on: January 19, 2011, 07:29:18 PM »
Hi Guys,
Stuff the books, I would look for an umbrella, and a soft landing. You can always buy new books. :lol:
Ned
I know enough to do what I do, but the more I know the more I can do!

Leafy suburbs of NW London

lordedmond

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Re: Grades of brass
« Reply #32 on: February 07, 2011, 02:20:30 PM »
Bogs,

...Try silver soldering (you call it silver braze) a bit of ali bronze, you will find it is almost impossible....


That made me smile.  A few month ago I had a bit of 'copper alloy' that I had turned up and drilled.  I needed a length of copper pipe brazing into it,  and as it was easier to get it done at work that to set up my own gear,  I dropped it off with out copper jig making chap.
Later the brought it to me saying "Rotten bit of brass you got there.  had one hell of a job brazing it."

That's when I remembered it was ally bronze.  Thought it best not to tell him at this stage.

Dave :doh:


It can be silver soldered with ease just add some table salt to your flux mix and all will be OK
http://www.cupalloys.co.uk/fluxes-c59.html

see hint 3

MrFluffy

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Re: Grades of brass
« Reply #33 on: February 08, 2011, 04:24:41 AM »
I have a lump of mystery metal Im fine with calling it ally, steel, brass etc. However occasionally I knock up fork yokes and wheel spindles and other high stress bits of motorbike, so I look up the properties then seek out and buy a specific grade of alloy or en graded steel for these bits probably for my own peace of mind as Im likely to be doing xyz mph on the thing later on, so there its really useful to have developed a feel for what grade will be right for that job.
I wouldn't dream of trying to get graded stuff from the scrappy, or worry about not taking if it wasnt, Im too busy filling my bucket excitedly at my find and mystery metal is just fine in most applications, although I have destroyed a few cutters on mystery grades of stainless in the past :D

Offline Engraver

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Re: Grades of brass
« Reply #34 on: May 19, 2011, 06:29:38 PM »
My first post, so I hope everything is in the right place! :wave:

http://www.columbiametals.co.uk/products/list.php?category=3

A useful site for the comparison of and the make up of all sorts of metals.
There is a section on brass.

They supply the product, but I am not sure in what quantities!

I have off cuts of sheet brass and stainless steel, and anodised aluminium.

CZ120 in 3mm and 1.5mm as well as nominal 1.0mm (usually 0.9mm!) and recently started using 0.7mm

I am an engraver - and I hate throwing away bits that somebody else could use!

Offline SPiN Racing

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Re: Grades of brass
« Reply #35 on: May 21, 2011, 10:46:13 PM »
Ya know.... on the subject of all the metal types, and or whats what. Yep. I do know some of the numbers of metal I need to know when ordering something specific.

BUT.

Even though I am on this side of the pond, I found that getting to know the manager of Alro metals near me, as well as one of his key guys.. names Guy actually.. really helps. I say.. heya.. they say HEYYY what you making now?? I say I need a chunk of metal about this big by that big.. and some sort of brass bronze thing. What do you have in drops??
THey dig around and show me things.. ask what Im gonna do to it.. and then produce something for me. If they dont have it.. they sell me the brand new stuff at a good rate. And they have a ultra happy return customer. And they know it. :D

Make friends with the guy who sells the metal, and they will take care of you, if they know you are a artisan/craftsman/fabricator.. not just some big company buying a specific quantity of material to sell to someone else.

Doesnt hurt to know the numbers.. but its much nicer to get along well with the supplier. I need X metal for these reasons. Ohh we dont have X but try Y.. its a better version, or different version.


Scott
SPiN Racing