Author Topic: Sidecar build  (Read 25640 times)

Offline Powder Keg

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Sidecar build
« on: November 17, 2008, 08:28:23 PM »
I bought a 1984 GL1200 a few months ago and have had a blast with it. I was chating with my wife one evening and mentioned that I thought a sidecar would be fun to try. She got all excited about the idea. Shortly after, I started designing and building one. Here are a few pictures. I'll post more soon.

The springs are salvaged off of an old Snowmobile.


One of the frame mounts I built.


Here is the axle I'm working on.


I bored out a Goldwing wheel to accept Timken bearings.


I laminated the floor out of 3/16" plywood.


Here I'm trying to get it all clamped together. My buddy Lee is helping me.


I got a good start on the body.


Hope you like it so far....

Wes
« Last Edit: November 17, 2008, 08:31:09 PM by Powder Keg »
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline Brass_Machine

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2008, 08:50:25 PM »
It's looking good so far Wes!  :clap: Good job!

One question... that Goldwing wheel on the lathe. 17in? How big is that chuck???

Eric
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Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2008, 09:04:11 PM »
It's a `16" chuck. I had to do that part at work;o) We have 4 20" X 80" lathes there.  I'll try and get a picture of the mill I run also. It has a 25" X 60" table. It weighs 24000 pounds.

Wes
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

bogstandard

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2008, 01:29:30 AM »
Lovely work as usual Wes, it also must be nice not having to worry about getting big bits machined.

I was wondering how you got on with your wing, enjoying it I hope.

The chappie I bought mine off wanted me to have one of the wing sidecars off him. But after a bit of thought I turned him down.

Travelling in the UK is slightly different than in the US. You use a bike to get thru all the continuous traffic jams, which you can't do when you are dragging a chair. I will have to stick with the trailer, but of course you can't carry an extra passenger in that (not legally anyway).

John

Offline Darren

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2008, 01:44:30 AM »
Looks good Wes, that axle looks a serious bit of kit too..
You will find it a distinct help… if you know and look as if you know what you are doing. (IRS training manual)

Offline CrewCab

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2008, 04:23:32 AM »
Nice work Wes  :thumbup:  Look forward to seeing this progress.

CC

Offline Bernd

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2008, 10:35:43 AM »
Nice work Wes.  :headbang:  :thumbup:

Bernd
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Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2008, 08:06:58 PM »
Thanks for the kind words :mmr:

Bogs, The wing is great!!! I'm still riding it and it's been in the 20's here in the morning :mmr: No traffic jams here though? Rural Idaho. I can't even remember if I've ever even been in a traffic jam? Once in a while a train blocks all the roads across town, Is that what your talking about?

I got a few more pieces of wood cut tonight. I'll try and get a couple more pictures.

Later, Wes
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline Bernd

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2008, 01:45:39 PM »
Rural Idaho!  :bugeye:  I didn't know they had trains up there.  ;D.

So you're riding in the cold. Got any snow yet?

Bernd
You can't fix "STUPID".

Offline backyard_cnc

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2008, 01:16:44 AM »
looks good so far. I also ride a GL1200, a minty 1985. Don't think I want a sidecar but I do tow a large teardrop trailer behind it! Check it out.

Gerald

Offline dsquire

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2008, 01:57:17 AM »
Powder Keg

Looks like the start of a nice side car. As a kid living in the country there was an older gentelman that used to come around driving an Indian with a side car always looking for scrap metal. I alway liked when he came as he would always talk to us kids and answer any of our questions and let us sit on his motorcycle. He would never give us a ride as the sidecar was always full of scrap metal. I always thought of it as a beautiful motorcycle. This would have been in the late 1940's.

In my browsing yesterday I came upon another 3 wheeler so will post a link here so you can check it out. Maybe this will be your next build!

http://link.brightcove.com/services/link/bcpid1735797252/bctid1729330625

hope this isn't too for :offtopic:

cheers

Don
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Offline Brass_Machine

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2008, 02:24:27 AM »
...

hope this isn't too for :offtopic:
...

Don

It is the natural flow of conversation. I personally do not feel it is :offtopic: as it concerns a motorcycle, a sidecar and your experience. Now if you had been talking about a parrot who rides a surfboard that you saw on the news last night... that would be :offtopic:

:thumbup:

Eric
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bogstandard

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #12 on: November 22, 2008, 03:57:47 AM »
In my younger days in the last century, a lot of us motorcyclists used to swap over to a different form of wheels for the winter. They used to have a heater (of a sorts), and were grossly unstable over 70mph. But they did allow you to carry the kids in comparative comfort (rearranging internal organs was the order of the day on B class roads).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Reliant_Regal_3-30.jpg

You were allowed to drive one if you had a full motorcycle licence because it weighed under 8 hundredweight (896 lbs) and was classed as a tricycle (bike with a sidecar).

I still see a few knocking about, even though they stopped production a fair few years back.

They were affectionally known as 'Plastic Pigs' because of the fibreglass body.

The all aluminium four cylinder, water cooled inline engines started off as 600cc and over the different ranges finished up at 850cc. The engines were used in a class of motor racing, the Formula 700 (the engine converters in the mid 70's were based in Market Drayton, Shropshire, just down the road from where I used to live, and I had mine tuned there, coupled with a higher ratio back axle, I could cruise at 90 if I felt brave enough). I was pulled over by the fuzz a few times, who couldn't believe that a 'pig' could go that fast, I never let on and blamed it on a tailwind or going downhill, they never noticed the large forwards facing Stromberg carb with a big bellmouth (you could only see part of the engine thru the top hatch, and if you wanted to do a lot of engine work, it was easier to drop the engine onto the floor, and lift the body over the top).
I also worked for a while making 'Mountain Range' fire engines (the smaller ones were based on a special six wheeled 'in house' conversion of the Range Rover, one of those would please Crew Cab), and the same basic engines were used on the portable pumps carried on board, two men could carry them easily, because of the light weight.

Getting away from the post slightly, just reminiscing, as we all do.

John

Offline dsquire

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2008, 04:25:58 AM »
John

As long as we are talking about 3 wheelers we're not too far off track.

If they ever outlaw reminiscing as we all do then they will have a fight on their hands.

Cheers

Don
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Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #14 on: November 23, 2008, 01:02:47 PM »
I'm pretty excieted about this project to;o) I got a couple more pieced glued on. Here is the brace infront of where the seat will be. Lots of angles in those little support pieces.


Here I am fitting a couple more braces to the trunk area. They are just sitting on the clamps for now.


I am going to try and get some more done today.

Wes
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #15 on: November 28, 2008, 01:31:27 PM »
I got some new clamps :) at Harbor freifght this holiday weekend. I also have some more pictures to post when I get home. They should be listed elsewhere, but since there pieces for the sidecar, I'll post them here. There is a bunch of machining and a bit of foundry work involved :D

Later, Wes
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

bogstandard

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #16 on: November 28, 2008, 01:38:27 PM »
It is looking real good Wes.

Are you fitting a brake on it, coupled to the bike back wheel brake, so you can pull up nice and straight, or just a straight freewheeler?

John

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #17 on: November 28, 2008, 02:22:11 PM »
No brake. But I have been toying with the idea of adding a altrinator and a spare battery. Since starting to ride the battery and the fuel department has been my only two troubles. both will be solved here :) I have a altrinaror off a Honda Civic that a friend donated and a batery box that I bought because it was on sale a while back. This will fit nicely in the trunk I think? I am also planing on adding a spare fuel tank to the unit. this will extend my range :D

Wes
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

bogstandard

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #18 on: November 28, 2008, 02:55:19 PM »
Luckily mine was fitted with a souped up alternator and battery just before I bought it. I am just rigging up an outside power point to keep the bike on trickle charge permanently while it isn't being used.

I too am a bit disappointed with the range of the bike, especially if I give it a bit of a burn up. I have had a few sweaty moments trying to reach a filling station. I should really keep a gallon can of fuel in the pannier just in case. I have a new timing disk to fit into the engine that hopefully will give me better MPG and more power, as the engine for this bike was derated by Honda, and this mod brings it up into line with the Valkyrie with regards to ignition timing.

If fitting a battery box in the trunk, I would suggest giving the whole area a coat of acid proof paint, the fumes will attack both metal and wood, you don't want the wife to fall out of the back (unless of course she is well insured).

John

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #19 on: December 01, 2008, 10:35:21 PM »
I've been way to busy to work on this project much, but i have been squeezing it in where I can. At school I made this.

It is the start of a tail light for my sidecar. It is 16" wide by 4" tall by 2.5" deep. I drew it up and programed it at school then machined it :) Here is a another shot at a different angle.

I still have to remove all of the material off of the back side. The thickest section will be .300" around the flange. The rest will be .250". I am going to take the sockets out of a commercial unit to light it up. I might try LED's also? I still haven't decided. It took 1 hour to do the machine work so far, including drilling and tapping all the holes.

Wes
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline Bernd

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #20 on: December 02, 2008, 11:25:47 AM »
Looking good Wes. I'd go for the LED's. They are so much brighter.

http://www.trailerpart.com/ check this place for LED lights. Might have something you could use. I put LED's on my trailer that I hauled the mill on. I liked those lights so much I installed LED's on my boat trailer. A bit more expensive but the bulbs last longer.

Bernd
You can't fix "STUPID".

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #21 on: December 03, 2008, 12:20:11 AM »
Well, I hosed my part... I'll have to try something different. I set the Z tool Height wrong on the first tool and cut my flange mostly off..... :zap:
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

bogstandard

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #22 on: December 03, 2008, 02:54:08 AM »
Wes,

Don't get disheartened, even us manual metal choppers turn the handle the wrong way sometimes.

You can't be perfect all the time, and having setbacks reminds us that we are only human.

John

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #23 on: December 05, 2008, 12:51:03 AM »
Well, I aquired anotherpiece of stock and am back to where I was when I messed up earlier this week. I'll continue on it on Tuesday. I also figured out what my problem was. I entered the wrong depth when I was programing it :zap:

Wes
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #24 on: November 08, 2009, 02:00:32 PM »
Well I haven't died. I just fell off the map for a while. I had way too many irons in the fire and had to take a step back. I've been working on my sidecar every chance I get. Sorry I haven't posted any progress I'll try to fill things in here.

I have the body pretty much done.



The frame is all welded up. I went to school last fall to brush up on my skills. here is a test run.



I have the two pieces together.



My rider and some fresh paint.



I'll post some more later:o)
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline CrewCab

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #25 on: November 08, 2009, 02:29:47 PM »
Well I haven't died. I just fell off the map for a while. 

Hiya Wes, good to hear from ya  :headbang:

looks like the passenger approves  :clap:

CC

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #26 on: November 08, 2009, 02:59:05 PM »
I'm working on a turn signal to go along with the brake light that I need to finish. Here are a couple of shots of what I have now. It's all Brass.





I made some pretty things for the sidecar wheel also out of brass.





I still have quite a bit to do. I'm building a windshield. There will be an onboard air compressor. that way I can fill a tire or adjust the shocks. Oh yeah, There's the air horns that are about ready to install :clap: I bought them a while ago at a yard sale. They were in pretty sad shape. I took the trumpets off and polished them up. they turned out pretty nice, so, I decided to take the horn apart and powdercoat it to match the bike. I drilled out the rivets and stripped the old paint off.





I'll get a picture of them all spiffy here soon.
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #27 on: November 09, 2009, 08:19:21 PM »
Some parts showed up today :ddb: :ddb: :ddb:



I need to make a mount for my air bottle, Then I can start figuring out where everything will live. I snagged some Stainless to make an enclose out of. I'll get to weld Stainless :D
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline Bernd

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #28 on: November 10, 2009, 04:55:07 PM »
I like that side car. Something "airy" about it.  :lol:

Bernd
You can't fix "STUPID".

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #29 on: February 27, 2010, 09:25:19 PM »
It's amazing how busy a fellow can get.....

I started mounting some of the stuff. I had a stainless steel refrigerator door that donated some of itself to make a shelf for my air compressor. I just cut out what I needed and drilled the mounting holes. I then TIG welded up a bracket and drilled the holes in it. It holds my air tank\o/



I have some HID lights to help me see where I'm going and a 7 prong trailer plug to wire the bike to the car.


More soon.....
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline dsquire

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #30 on: February 28, 2010, 12:21:58 AM »
Wes

Looking good. Spring is on the way, you will have to keep at it now so you are ready for the good riding weather. Love those air horns, they will be a big attention getter. Keep up the good work.  :ddb: :ddb:

Cheers  :beer:

Don
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Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #31 on: February 28, 2010, 08:35:07 PM »
I forgot to mention that I changed my mind on the honkers. I decided to build some Steam whistles. They'll run fine on air. I saved some brass handrail bits from the recyclers a while back and decided that they would make sweet looking whistles. I started by turning the end pieces to fit the brass tube that I have.



Here Is what I have so far. I'll silver solder them togather and make a manifold this week. A 3 chime whistle will be fun I think :D



I'll be sure to pot a video when I get them working.

Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline J. Tranter

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #32 on: March 01, 2010, 12:16:02 AM »
Do you have plans for the steah whistles or are they your own? I have been wanting to make some but for some reason I just can't figure it out.

John T.

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #33 on: March 01, 2010, 06:37:56 AM »
These are my own design John. For some quick plans, Here are some that I found on the net. They were drawn by my buddy Birk Peterson.



Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline J. Tranter

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #34 on: March 01, 2010, 08:54:54 PM »
Thnk you for the help. This project looks beautiful bt the way.

John T.

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #35 on: March 07, 2010, 12:43:18 PM »
I powder coated the air tank Chrome :headbang:

Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #36 on: March 14, 2010, 12:32:05 AM »
I think LED's are confusing? So far I think I need about 90000 mcd's for turn/brake lights and around 20000 mcd's for running lights. Does this sound about right? Or am I on my own? I'll get my lights from http://www.superbrightleds.com/cgi-b...Fled_prods.htm I found a calculator that helps design the circuit. I'll be getting the stuff this week\o/ I want to get these lights wired up and on my rig. Can they be too bright?

Stay tuned.....
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...

Offline BobWarfield

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #37 on: March 15, 2010, 04:37:11 PM »
Cool sidecar, Wes!

BW
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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #38 on: August 27, 2010, 05:19:59 AM »
4 months since posted but maybe I can add something after the fact for the next bits n bobs to think about  :)
I used to run a watsonian double adult sidecar outfit (its in my field at the moment, but on the wrong side for my current location) and dabbled in that side of things a bit, two things, first if you swap out your forks for leading link forks instead, you will be amazed at the difference in handling and steering and general manageability. The tele forks tend to lock up under the different demands and forces the chair places on them. Its well worth considering and you should snag a ride on a outfit thus equipped to see what I mean. If you must keep the tele's for solo use, there are dedicated chair dampers which can tame the tankslapper that sooner or later may happen. I removed mine for testing one day and got into a uncontrollable slapper at 20mph and had a moment trying to kill the engine while it was thrashing about wildly...

Also if you fit a brake to the chair make it independent from the bike's brakes. I don't know how much road time you've had on it it, but you must have had the problem on long sweeping slow bends curved in the direction of the sidecar, where while you'd normally accelerate gently round shorter ones, you run out of acceleration near the apex on a long curve to do this and end up fighting the bars wrenching your back maybe (or maybe I just rode too hard on the thing!). If you have a independent chair setup you can touch the chair brake and drag the chair slower gently instead and that will pull the bike round the curve a lot easier and more in control, no fighting bars at all, and you can still do the same for bends the other way with the bike only rear brake. Just another string to the bow of how to control. If you ride the bike solo, you can mount the pedal etc on the chair so it stays with the chair.

Last one, if you loose your mind and take it up the drag strip (which we did for a laugh), pull up to the line skewed so the chair is ahead slightly of the straight position, then when you get the go light you can dump the clutch and get on the throttle and itll naturally pull straight. By which time your launched and charging down the track while your compettition gets their wits together still :) My watsonian was on a 750gt kawasaki, and we took it run-what-ya-brung at the bulldog bash one year for a laugh and came within a hairs bredth of taking the sidecar class (and would have if a 9 second 7L blown dedicated 3 wheel drag car with no electrics/bodywork/lights running on methanol hadn't been allowed to race in our street legal class, but hey he was a guest of the organizers and we were nobodys so what to do...)

My chair was good fun, sometimes I consider dragging it out and bolting it the 750 turbo which has the same fitments and chassis as the gt and maybe Ill do that when my family gets a bit older to take them out in it... But you might sometimes think the same things why not to, that is you get wet when it rains still, and still get stuck in traffic. Worst of both worlds of car and bike in one for day to day use.
 

Offline Powder Keg

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Re: Sidecar build
« Reply #39 on: August 27, 2010, 10:59:00 AM »
I've been riding the wheels off it. :med: When the weather cools down I'll get back to work finishing up the last few things that need done. I've thought of making new front forks, but for now I'm getting buy. Most of the roads around here are really straight. So It's not that big of an issue. A brake would be nice once in a while, but it's not bugging me bad enough to re do the wheel for brakes.

I mainly ride solo. But my wife enjoys going for the occasional ride.  :ddb: The drags would be fun.. I'll have to try that someday.
Wesley P
A Gismo ??? If it has a flywheel or spins and is made with small parts. I'll take one! If it makes noise, moves, or requires frequent oiling and dusting it's a better deal yet. It's especially right if its shiny and bright; but if it's dirty and dull it wont mater at all...