Author Topic: 5 axis mill  (Read 3686 times)

Offline j45on

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 380
  • My tiny workshop Location Ashford Kent
5 axis mill
« on: March 14, 2011, 10:31:03 AM »
Do you think I could part ex my mini mill for one of these ?  :bugeye:
Actually I think it might be bigger than my shop
&feature=youtu.be
Jason

Offline jim

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 439
  • Country: 00
Re: 5 axis mill
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2011, 10:56:01 AM »
that's one job i wouldn't want to program!!!
if i'd thought it through, i'd have never tried it

Offline Bernd

  • Madmodder Committee
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3683
  • Country: us
  • 1915 C Cab
    • Kingstone Model Works
Re: 5 axis mill
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2011, 10:15:40 AM »
This may be the machine that started it all. Listen for the date it was designed or built.

                  ]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7TowJZQi-qY]

Imagine the parts you could make at home if a table top model was avialable.

Bernd
You can't fix "STUPID".

Offline Lew_Merrick_PE

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 670
Re: 5 axis mill
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2011, 11:59:58 AM »
Imagine the parts you could make at home if a table top model was avialable.

Back in the 1970's, this system was called the "hexapod."  There are several systems being DIY'ed right now if you Google "hexapod."

Offline Bernd

  • Madmodder Committee
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3683
  • Country: us
  • 1915 C Cab
    • Kingstone Model Works
Re: 5 axis mill
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2011, 05:37:11 PM »
Lew,

That's how I found the Hexapod. I remember a freind talking about it at work. He saw it a tool trade show.

I didn't think of the table top mill untill I posted the message, then didn't feel like going back to searching again.

Bernd

You can't fix "STUPID".

Offline Lew_Merrick_PE

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 670
Re: 5 axis mill
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2011, 10:41:34 PM »
That's how I found the Hexapod. I remember a freind talking about it at work. He saw it a tool trade show.

I didn't think of the table top mill untill I posted the message, then didn't feel like going back to searching again.

The "issue" is stiffness.  While I don't disagree that the hexapod approach is (mathematically, at least) interesting, their cost for capacity is much larger than conventional 6-axis milling machines and their stiffness is really not that much better.  The Sundstrand Series-80/6 is at least as capable for about 40% the capital outlay -- assuming that Sundstrand ever fixed their resolver-feedback issues.  I was doing R&D for DoE and DoD on such beasties in 1984.  I don't believe I was a functionally worthwhile hexapod until (about) 1990.  I did think that it was interesting that G&L is using the (1983-84 development) active inferometer we developed for aligning AWACS antenna system at Grumman and Boeing (NBS development contract).  I will argue that G&L overplayed the tooling/fixture issue in their advert.  The issues are (as always) holding the part securely and allowing the cutter to access it.  That does not change between "conventional" and "hexapod" cutting operations.