Author Topic: Small sawmill  (Read 7001 times)

Offline mhh

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 74
  • Country: dk
Small sawmill
« on: February 19, 2013, 01:44:25 PM »
Hi! A bad case of  :proj: On top of all the other projects!  :doh:

I'm currently drawing up a 'small sawmill' with about 12m capacity. (Portal type for saving space)
My first thought was to have the feed driven by a rollerchain, but looking at the prices I suddenly changed my mind!  :D
Racks an pinion also comes to mind but they of course is equally expensive!
Just having two rubber wheels make contact to the frame do not appeal to me because of the possibility of one wheel slipping and the portal twisting.

Wire seems in my mind the way to go! I'm thinking of putting one motor on each end let one do the feed and then the other do the return (also a way of having a rapid return by letting one motor go faster on the return)


Are there any other clever ideas from the wise people in here?
 

Offline Alan Haisley

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 68
  • Country: us
Re: Small sawmill
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2013, 02:06:46 PM »
A quick sketch of what you have in mind could help.

Alan

Offline mhh

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 74
  • Country: dk
Re: Small sawmill
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2013, 02:26:14 PM »
A really quick sketch of the general idea.
Nothing fancy

Offline Alan Haisley

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 68
  • Country: us
Re: Small sawmill
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2013, 02:51:48 PM »
I assume that the idea is to hold the log on some form of cradle or fixture and use the cables to pull the horizontal bandsaw through it, cutting off a slab. It might be better if the bandsaw were vertical so that the weight of the slab being cut doesn't pinch the blade, but the commercial units all seem to have a horizontal blade.

By the way, there are commercial band mills that use a hand fed blade. You might start there and then add power feed.

Alan

Offline Bert

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 18
  • Country: ca
Re: Small sawmill
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2013, 02:58:33 PM »
Hi

Worth a look, may be some ideas here.

http://www.homemodelenginemachinist.com/f31/model-sawmill-dreaming-19319/

Regards ..bert

Offline mhh

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 74
  • Country: dk
Re: Small sawmill
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2013, 03:01:26 PM »
I assume that the idea is to hold the log on some form of cradle or fixture and use the cables to pull the horizontal bandsaw through it, cutting off a slab. It might be better if the bandsaw were vertical so that the weight of the slab being cut doesn't pinch the blade, but the commercial units all seem to have a horizontal blade.

By the way, there are commercial band mills that use a hand fed blade. You might start there and then add power feed.

Alan

Yes there will be 'hooks' on each end of the log.
And there is going to be some kind of separator behind the blade to avoid the pinching
I think (And I am not sure) that they cut horizontally to avoid the slab from 'falling' and breaking the end of.

I have tried cutting slabs with a handheld chainsaw sawmill and that is something you really get tired from fast!  :D Of course with this setup it will be easier, but being so damn lazy that I am I think that adding the powerfeed from the beginning is the way to go!  :D

Thank you for your input!    :thumbup:

Offline vtsteam

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5010
  • Country: us
  • Republic of Vermont
    • www. sredmond.com
Re: Small sawmill
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2013, 05:38:17 PM »
I just push mine through by hand. Takes 60 seconds for a 16' long 16" wide pine slab.




I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
www.sredmond.com

Offline Jasonb

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 451
  • Country: gb
Re: Small sawmill
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2013, 02:38:46 AM »
The bandsaw leaves a much smaller kerf than a chainsaw so you will find it a lot easier to push through even compared to a chainsaw fitted with a rip blade.

Again the set of the teeth will give you enough clearance just behind the blad so unlikely to pinch. Cutting horizontally also makes it a lot easier to dog the log.

You say hooks in the log. Are you intending to pull the log through a stationary bandsaw? You would be far better moving the saw through the log thats how most bandmills work like woodmizers, logosol, etc. Also takes up half the space.

Offline mhh

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 74
  • Country: dk
Re: Small sawmill
« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2013, 02:46:28 AM »
The bandsaw leaves a much smaller kerf than a chainsaw so you will find it a lot easier to push through even compared to a chainsaw fitted with a rip blade.

Again the set of the teeth will give you enough clearance just behind the blad so unlikely to pinch. Cutting horizontally also makes it a lot easier to dog the log.

You say hooks in the log. Are you intending to pull the log through a stationary bandsaw? You would be far better moving the saw through the log thats how most bandmills work like woodmizers, logosol, etc. Also takes up half the space.

By hooks I mean hooks to keep the log in place and then move the saw. Clamps is most likely a better word.

I actually think you all have me convinced to forget the powerfeed and just push the saw.

Offline S. Heslop

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 930
  • Country: gb
  • Newcastle Upon Tyne
Re: Small sawmill
« Reply #9 on: February 20, 2013, 09:52:23 AM »
http://woodgears.ca/bandmill/index.html

Edit: Whoops somehow hit submit reply early.

Yeah this might be of use. This guy's 'gimmick' is woodworking machinary made mostly from wood, but more because of price and availability rather than for the novelty. He sells plans for this but even if you're working with metal you can still borrow ideas.

A thing I quite like about him is that even though he's selling the plans, he still more or less tells you exactly how he made it. I'll probably buy the plans for and build his regular bandsaw if I ever get time for it.

Offline vtsteam

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5010
  • Country: us
  • Republic of Vermont
    • www. sredmond.com
Re: Small sawmill
« Reply #10 on: February 20, 2013, 02:19:44 PM »
Saw dogs is the term I use for that. Here are some I came up with -- they not only immobilize the log but they also jam fit on the cross beams. I just tap at the bottom and it locks on the cross beam (I think mine are 3"channel set on edge) then tap in the top into the log. To release just tap away from the log at the bottom.

They are nice because they aren't a permanent part of the track way, and can be moved around wherever needed. I pt them at the far edge when rolling a log onto the track to serve as stops. These are much faster to work with than permanently attached dogs. Kind of proud of this design.






I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
www.sredmond.com

Offline vtsteam

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5010
  • Country: us
  • Republic of Vermont
    • www. sredmond.com
Re: Small sawmill
« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2013, 02:27:51 PM »
My saw is a "Simple Saw" designed by Bill Rake. another unsung mechanical genius -- much like David Gingery (though he at least is well known now).

Unfortunately I'm afraid Bill Rake may not still be with us, as his website disappeared. Last I spoke to him about 10 years ago he'd just had a triple bypass operation. I've been trying to find out if he is still okay, but haven't been able to.

The best website devoted to his saw design, with tons of good information added by Phil Kruppt is here:

http://kruppt.tripod.com/

I think Bill Rake built and designed over 30 different saw mills, both band and circular, and built many more. I sure hope he's okay. Best to you Bill wherever you are.
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
www.sredmond.com

Offline mhh

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 74
  • Country: dk
Re: Small sawmill
« Reply #12 on: February 21, 2013, 07:17:07 AM »
My saw is a "Simple Saw" designed by Bill Rake. another unsung mechanical genius -- much like David Gingery (though he at least is well known now).

Unfortunately I'm afraid Bill Rake may not still be with us, as his website disappeared. Last I spoke to him about 10 years ago he'd just had a triple bypass operation. I've been trying to find out if he is still okay, but haven't been able to.

The best website devoted to his saw design, with tons of good information added by Phil Kruppt is here:

http://kruppt.tripod.com/

I think Bill Rake built and designed over 30 different saw mills, both band and circular, and built many more. I sure hope he's okay. Best to you Bill wherever you are.

Aaaand now I have to design a set of wheels for it!  :D

Do you have a picture of how you use your saw dogs?


Offline vtsteam

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5010
  • Country: us
  • Republic of Vermont
    • www. sredmond.com
Re: Small sawmill
« Reply #13 on: February 21, 2013, 08:19:08 AM »
I don't mhh, and right now my saw track is buried under about a foot of snow and ice, so I can't take a photo. If we get a thaw any time soon, I'll take a pic.
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
www.sredmond.com

Offline mhh

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 74
  • Country: dk
Re: Small sawmill
« Reply #14 on: February 21, 2013, 09:33:18 AM »
That would be great.