Author Topic: Boxford lathe...old  (Read 8678 times)

Offline Ian.C

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Boxford lathe...old
« on: March 17, 2013, 09:46:49 AM »
Hi there, I have recently bought this old lathe, the previous owner did not know what model it was, its serial No is DEH 3656/4001, I would like to know what model it is to try and get hold of a manual for it.



I hope that worked.

The first problem I have with it is what I think is a belt tensioning lever which has sheared, I have removed the grub screw from the knurled adjustment collar but cannot withdraw the threaded bar, I thought it would just slide out to enable me to repair it, here is a closer picture.



I have always wanted a lathe but have very limited knowledge so be kind to me! If any one could help I would be very grateful.

Ian

Offline John Rudd

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2013, 10:08:56 AM »
Hi Ian and welcome to Madmodder... :wave:

Looks like your lathe could be a Boxford B variety...

Some more info at www.lathes.co.uk, might be helpful... :coffee:
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Offline andyf

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2013, 10:17:36 AM »
Hi Ian, and welcome.

Chances are someone here will have the answer, but if not you might consider joining this Yahoo Group which is devoted to Boxfords: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BoxfordLathe-UserGroup/

Andy
Sale, Cheshire
I've cut the end off it twice, but it's still too short

Offline RussellT

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2013, 03:11:00 PM »
Hi Ian

It's an early model C.  There's no power cross feed lever on the Apron so it's not an A or B.  It's got a lead screw so it's not a T.  The motor is at the back so it's not one of the underdrive variants AUD, BUD etc.

All that's left is a model C.

The lever you're trying to dismantle moves the motor back to tension the belt and that's the feature that identifies it as an early Model C.  I've never played with one like that but I think the lever moves the rod on it's thread.  Have a look at the other end and see what's going on there.  Can you turn it without damaging the end - if it's threaded it may need unscrewing.

Russell
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Offline Ian.C

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2013, 06:12:00 AM »
Thanks for the replies. The adjustment collar is obviously on a threaded section, where it passes through the casting it exits as a bar rather than being threaded and locates in the motor holding cradle. I still cant understand how moving the tensioning lever in a left to right arc moves a shaft perpendicular to the line of the arc. The adjustment collar nipps up really tight when trying to unscrew it from the thread and the end sheared quite clean. I need a drawing really.

Offline RussellT

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2013, 06:55:52 AM »
Hi Ian

Here's a photo showing the parts.

http://www.lathes.co.uk/boxford/page6.html

If you read the rest of the site you'll see that in spite of my confidently saying it's a Model C it might be a CSB - a cheaper version of the C.

Russell
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Offline Ian.C

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2013, 08:20:03 AM »
Russell,

I can't thank you enough, one of the pictures clearly shows that there's a grubscrew that retains the mechanism in the casting. I will need to elavate the lathe high enough to loosen the grub screw, this might be a small lathe but my God , I cannot believe how heavy it is, it took four blokes to lift it and one of them has still got a bad back...I got my lathe in position though :thumbup:

ian

Offline RussellT

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2013, 12:48:57 PM »
Hi Ian

I'm pleased I could help.

Apparently the bars that stick out the back are prone to bending so probably best not to roll it over to the back.

You might be able to roll it forwards - or slide it off the edge of the bench to get at the grub screw from below (best to have an assistant make sure it doesn't slip on top of you).

Russell
Common sense is unfortunately not as common as its name suggests.

Offline Ian.C

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2013, 04:10:09 PM »
Well my mate with a bad back wouldnt help me tonight lifting the lathe, I can't think why! but I wont be beaten so ended up doing this.



A bit belt and braces but it worked, the grub screw fooled me because when I removed it I still couldnt withdraw housing,so I got a mirror under the bed and I could see that there was another grub screw under the one I had just removed, anyway with the second one out I was able to withdraw the collar bushing, I still cant get the shaft out because of a pin that locates in a spiral bushing that forces the tensioning of the belt. Thats for tomorrow now.

Offline vtsteam

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2013, 08:37:03 PM »
Good work locating that second grub screw!  I've seen that a few times before as a lock or safety screw.

In fact I might just follow suit on an old Sears table saw pulley grub screw that occasionally likes to come loose, no matter how I tighten it on its key. I was just using it today an noticed that rattley sound of the screw starting to get loose and the pulley vibrating on the key. Good to read this reminder of a simple solution!

Anyway that was smart, checking with a mirror!  :thumbup:
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
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Offline RussellT

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2013, 06:16:05 AM »
Hi Ian

Well done spotting the extra screw.  I've been fooled by that somewhere else on my lathe but I can't remember where.

It might be easier to extract the shaft backwards - you'd probably need to remove the headstock belt but they're normally link belts so can be removed without any dismantling.

Russell
Common sense is unfortunately not as common as its name suggests.

Offline Ian.C

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2013, 08:14:45 AM »
I will take a picture of the two grubscrews tonight as the first one you come to is not a normal looking one, its more of cap than grubscrew, I think its clever idea now...but I didnt yesterday!

Offline Ian.C

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2013, 02:00:34 PM »
Well I've had some success tonight I managed to punch the pin out that was preventing me extracting the bar, here's a picture showing all the parts including the little swine of the capping grub screw.



I just need to repair the sheared end and put it back together, that wont be until the Weekend now as I am away for the next few days.

Then the next problem, have I mentioned the backlash in the cross slide!

Ian

Offline RussellT

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2013, 05:02:47 PM »
Hi Ian

I think I understand now.  The knurled knob and thread allows adjustment and the lever puts the tension on and off for belt changing.  That explains why two grubscrews are needed as the first one can't be tightened or it would stop the adjuster moving.  I assume the narrow portion is the bit that's broken off.  It looks tricky to fix.

The cross slide nut isn't adjustable but you might be able to tighten up the knob to reduce the end float.

Russell
Common sense is unfortunately not as common as its name suggests.

Offline Ian.C

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2013, 03:55:15 AM »
Russell,

Yes you are correct regarding the grub screws, I was thinking about it last night, it all makes sense when you have everything apart.

Could you explain a little bit more about tightening the knob to reduce the end float, as I'm not sure which knob your refering to.

I know very little about lathes as you might of guessed.

Thanks

Ian

Offline RussellT

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #15 on: March 20, 2013, 05:20:29 AM »
Hi Ian

The knob I meant is the ball handle you can see at the extreme right of your first picture - the one that moves the cross slide in and out.

The cross slide can have slack in two places.  One end is attached to the cross slide by a bronze nut, there is no adjustment and to remove backlash at that end you need a new nut and possibly screw.  The other end is anchored by the collar around the screw at the ball handle end and if there is room for the screw to move back and forth that will be seen as backlash.  It is easy to adjust - there is a locking grubscrew in the ball handle  (only one :D) and a locknut on the end of the handle.  The handle itself is screwed on. You might need to make a special screwdriver like tool for the locking nut.  The objective is to get the handle as tight as you can without making it difficult to turn.  It may also be worth checking that the collar is tight on the cross slide.

Russell
Common sense is unfortunately not as common as its name suggests.

Offline Ian.C

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Re: Boxford lathe...old
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2013, 12:12:27 PM »
Russell,

Thanks again for your help. I can now tension my belt again thanks to some welding.

The crossslide starts tomorrow.

Ian