Author Topic: Log Store  (Read 51426 times)

Offline drmico60

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #50 on: August 22, 2013, 04:07:26 PM »
I lived in Sweden for a few years and, although I was surrounded by forests, the wood from a diy store was about twice the price in Sweden compared with buying in a diy store in the UK.
Mike

Never been to Sweden, though I have been through it on the way to Norway.  In Norway everything was three times the price it is in the UK, it even makes Switzerland seem cheap :clap:

What were you doing in Sweden?  A mate of mine lived there for a while doing some arty stuff, he appears to have found a wife there.  Did you get one of those too? :thumbup:

I already had a wife when I went there. Most Swedish men hanker after a placement in Brazil or Thailand to find a wife.
I was working in the match industry in Sweden.
Mike

Offline DaveH

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #51 on: August 22, 2013, 04:32:44 PM »
Wow, Ross this is going to be a piece of art  :thumbup:
 :beer:
DaveH
(Ex Leicester, Thurmaston, Ashby De La Zouch.)

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #52 on: August 22, 2013, 07:48:11 PM »

 
I was working in the match industry in Sweden.
Mike

You were a matchmaker in Sweden, surely you found everyone else a wife then :)
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #53 on: August 22, 2013, 08:03:09 PM »
“Ladies and Gentlemen, We interrupt the main feature for a brief intermission, choc-ices, Poppets and Kia-Ora can be bought from Gladys, who will come amongst you with her well stacked tray!  Woodbines, Park Drive and Capstan Full Strength can be purchased from the Kiosk.  We will be showing a public information film called ‘a brief review of the Power Craft 370W Bench Morticer”.

I’ve only used one of these things once before, so if anyone who knows what they’re doing can see the “stupids” I’m doing please chip in!!

Many a year ago a friend of mine suggested popping into Aldi/Lidl/Netto? as they had some carpentry stuff on sale, I’m sure nobody on here has ever been taken in by this reckless impulse☺.

So off we popped and an hour or two later and despite my usual desire to buy the best kit I can get, I came home with a bench morticer, table saw, compound mitre saw, a set of morticer “chisels” and a set of dowels and £120 less in the bank.  Anyway most of this has been placed in the “climate controlled store” till such time as it may come in handy, that’s it in the box under the generator;



Having been asked to do this log-store thingy, I thought “aha” the time of handiness has come, so out it got shifted.

Somehow it seemed to be in good nick and this is what you get;



A lump of metal and some bits ‘n’ bobs, loose or in bags, including one 5/16 “chisel”.  It has Omega-Wolf Ltd on the label and is made in China.  This may be a successor in name to Wolf, the old British Machine-Tool company who used to make very good industrial machine tools “back in the day”.  It says the chisel range is 6-13mm and maximum drill size is 13mm.

You need to fit the fence, footie-holdie-woodie-down thing, piece of wood for the table wotsit, pull-the-thing-down handle and you get an extension piece/taper doo-dah (which they call a taper drift, but that aint wot I call a taper drift, one of them is wot you knock one of these out with surely, or am I thinking of a taper drift drift?) and spare chuck to use it as a bench drill.  The machine itself is made of castings, as is the base and feels pretty solid and weighty.  Not too bad for about 30quid thought I!  There are four slots on the “foot plate” for a drill vice or similar and four mounting holes.  BEFORE USE THIS MACHINE REALLY DOES NEED TO BE SECURED TO A STURDY WORKBENCH, YES, REALLY!”

Once (ahem) securely mounted on the machine bench!!!……..

“WARNING WARNING, don’t try this at home children, this man is a trained professional (admittedly not in a wood workshop!), and says he knows what he is doing!  He may not necessarily follow best H&S or machinery practice to the letter!”
 
…..I attached the fence, the foot thingy and the wooden base-plate wotsit.  The instructions are okayish but not overly clear, the machine already had the fence guide fitted which was not how the instructions had it.

Having loosely put this together I tried to square the fence up to the two pillars that the morticer moves up and down on;





 I found that the guide that the fence moves in and out on has a fair bit of slop and if you’re a perfectionist, you’ll have to square the fence every time you move it, plus I doubt whether it’ll stay square when used.  The travel on the fence is locked with a lifty-handley thing and the foot wotsit is adjusted and locked by a turney-wheel handle.  Having tried it, I think they would be better the other way round, but they have different thread sizes so can’t be.  You need to get more force on the foot to hold the wood down, particularly when withdrawing the chisel after the first cut.  After the first cut, the wood grips onto the chisel quite hard and lifts with the chisel, pushing the foot back up.  As it is, I had to lean down hard on the timber and pull the handle up, or apply a mallet!  The motion is also very stiff and you have to put a lot of force on the handle to move it down, or pull it out of wood.  This may be because it doesn’t have a normal spring, but a piston-rod-thingy like on the hatch-back of a car.

It has a depth-stop(?)  Which you need to set by rule-and-eye or by lowering the mortice chisel to the required depth, but it’s a bit tricky as I can find no lock for setting the lowered morticer at a fixed height.  I also first set this by eying through to the body casting, which is where I thought it would contact, but found a panel on the base of the casting actually touched the stop first;



Unfortunately this is all a bit irrelevant, as the depth-stop(?) does not bite onto the pillar very well.  The amount of force required to lower the machine and cut into the wood is so high that the depth stop will slide down the pillar when the morticer gets to it.  I found I had to lean down to look at the depth-stop to see when the casing came to it, cos I had it on a low bench.  The low bench was an advantage as I had to lean on the handle very hard to get it to work, the handle is made of thin-walled tubing held by a small screw and I’m concerned as to how well it will stand up to the force placed on it.

Next thing I did was mount the chisel.  This is a squared hollow piece of steel, machined to have four sharp points and sharp edges to cut a “square hole”into the wood, there is an auger bit up the middle to cut most of the wood out.  I was using the largest bit, 19mm which is (ahem!) bigger than specified (oops!) But it came in the set wot were on sale in the same shop from the same brand!!!.  This may have caused some issues, which smaller chisels won’t, so bear this in mind when reading this review.

Due to clearance issues, I could not put the chisel in followed by the auger, so I put them both in together pushing them up using my finger tip, as stated in the instructions, there’s probably a much safer way of doing this!  Please someone tell me!

I realised I had to open the Jacob’s chuck first as the auger shank was pretty thick.  The chuck itself is fully enclosed in the casting, and there are two “windows” you can open to tighten and loosen the chuck with a “safety key”.  However it’s very easy to leave the key in the chuck as it can stick in the window.  Remember “EITHER THE CHUCK’S IN THE HAND OR THE BOX, NEVER LEAVE IT IN THE B****Y CHUCK OR YOU”LL BE B****Y SORRY!” as an instructor I know is fond of saying;



The chisel itself is held in the collar of the machine with a hex socket screw and “Allen Key”;



There doesn’t seem to be anywhere to clip the key to the machine, which is a bit of a pain, however the chuck key can be clipped to one or other of the windows.  When you drop the “Allen Key” under the bench, which you will do, often, this is an excellent opportunity to find all those other little wotsits you couldn’t seem to find earlier☺;

I think the chisel should be squared to the fence; sliding the fence forward and setting it to the front face of the foot thingy could do this;



Mind you this showed up another problem; the footy thing slides down in front of the fence, this means you can’t get the chisel closer to the fence than about 19mm, ¾”.  If you’re doing smaller mortices you may want to have a smaller gap to the fence and can’t.  I thought you may want to put some hardwood, nylon or something on the fence, either side of the footy thing to do this.  You could use carpet tape or glue to do this, but there are no holes in the fence to screw something to the face.  You’d have to do this yourself.  If I’m missing an obvious trick here please tell me, (gently of course).

It was now time to get the thing going, smoke was plumbed into the machine through a piece of electric string via a standard 3 pin plug and the start button was pressed.  The machine has a start button and stop button, the start button being guarded by raised edges, the stop button not, which is a “safety feature.  At this point I realised I’ve probably set the thing up wrongly.  I think the auger should be inserted quite far into the chisel, but I seem to have pushed it in too far.  With the power on the motor hummed but did not turn the auger.  It was fouling inside the chisel.  I stopped and restarted the motor and there were some grindy, crunchy noises and then it seemed to run smoothlyish.  Have I missed a trick here?  Or is this a normal bedding-in process.  Should I have locked the chisel in place first and then dropped the auger a tad, or is there some quick way of setting a clearance?

I then applied some brute force to a piece of treated pine (CLS?).  This is where I found you need a lot of force on the lever and you definitely need to have the thing bolted down to a solid bench.  There is a lot of resistance in the mechanism, which may be simple to “fettle” out but I haven’t had time to look into that.  This may have been in some point due to using too large a chisel, but it was very stiff even before the chisel got to the wood.  I can’t see the auger pulling the chisel through the wood with the current set up.  The working surface is quite small and there are no outriggers.  You’ll need to have supports for wood of any length.  I also realised that if you were going to put this on a smaller bench, you’d probably benefit from pre-drilling mounting holes at each end and the middle of the bench and maybe using wing-nuts to secure it.  You can then easily move it around for longer lengths of wood.  I SUGGEST YOU DON’T GET TEMPTED INTO USING IT WITHOUT SOME FORM OF SECURING!  Also; THE CHUCK KEY SHOULD ALWAYS BE IN YOUR HAND OR IN THE TOOL BOX, NEVER LEAVE IT IN THE CHUCK!!

To sum up:  This is not a serious machine for serious carpentry.  It seems to be suitable for light craft-work and occasional use.  It is limited to a13mm cut.  It is a pretty solid machine, which could be much improved if you’re a good fettler.  I think it needs a certain amount of fettling out of the box to be usable or safe, but that may be because this one has been in storage for a few years.  I’m not sure if these things are on sale at the moment, but this sort of thing comes around every so often in Aldi/Netto/Lidl (still can’t remember which one!).  Also I’m sure idiots like me are putting them on ebay now and again.


“Ladies and Gentlemen, please return to your seats as the main feature is about to start.  Gladys also asks that the young gentlemen in the back row stop pinching her Kia-Oras or she’ll give ‘em a right what for!”








Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #54 on: August 22, 2013, 08:05:58 PM »
Wow, Ross this is going to be a piece of art  :thumbup:
 :beer:
DaveH

Ta Dave :)
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #55 on: August 23, 2013, 10:03:03 AM »
Hennyway (as they say in Croydon!)

I’d completed all the tenons on the front frame pieces and cut the lap-joint (“I say sir, how much for a gin and tonic!?  When I wandered in here I was thinking it was like any other normal pub!”).

I  thought I’d fit the lap-joint first and then offer all the other tenons up to see if I’d got anywhere near with the marks for the mortices.  First thing I noticed was that it wouldn’t fit together straight away, which I think is a good thing, apparently it’s harder to put wood back on with a chisel than take it off, so if anything I’d tried to cut “inside my lines” As I’m not particularly good at holding the saw “square or plumb” or following the line.

I got out the chisel and pushed down, shaving the “sides” of the joint, particularly where I could see I was inside my marked line;



I kept doing this to see if the joint would fit and tried to look at which “face?” of the joint was wider.  Whilst doing this I somehow remembered some good advice wot a “proper chippie” had told me ages ago.  Instead of offering the joint, open hole to open hole;



 I did each one at a time, offering the joint up to the “back” of the joint, i.e. the other side of the timber, where it was whole.  With doing this I got the two to match up and they slid together as a firm sliding fit, but I did have to resort to the hitting stick to get it all the way in, but this was “tapping it” and not “bashing” it.  The last time did this I think I offered the joints up face to face and ended up with somewhere to park my bicycle!

As I said, it went together with a bit of force and I’m quite chuffed with how it turned out.  No big gaps;



That looks pretty square to me;



And the front faces seem fairly level;



Next up, putting the frame loosely together to check the joints against each other, before committing to more “butchery”;



I’d put a wee bit of effort into levelling the frame, with some (ahem) off-cuts (okay, they’re going to be the side beams and braces, but let’s not worry about mere details here);



The bottom “beam” and middle “post” were fairly square so I used these as my “reference”.  I put the top “beam” across and the side posts, trying to match tenons to mortice marks, this was a bit tricky as I haven’t followed standard practice here.  Normally (or at least when building a house or barn!) the posts have tenons at each and the beams mortices.  As I have little legs underneath the bottom beam (floor plate?) the mortices are in the bottom of the posts.  This means I’ll have to slide the top beam across when checking each joint.

Once I’d sorted out where the bits went, I thought I’d just check the top beam for “square”;





I’m not sure how clearly the electric Daguerreotype shows it, but you can probably see that there’s something not right here and it looks like the top beam is bowed.

“Ladies and Gentlemen, we have another brief intermission, the feature will restart presently, young gentlemen in the back row, if Gladys comes in here once more telling me what you are doing, we will have to remove you from the theatre!”

I tried to use the square the other way round to check the beam too and then started to think the square wasn’t!  So I went to check the square.

An Engineer told me (“before he died, tiddy boom, tiddy boom, tiddy boom!”), that a quick way to check a square was this, Get a nice straight bit of desk or something, hold the stock of the square to the edge of it, firmly and mark a line up the “blade,rule, long-bendy-thingy; 




Flip it over and check to see if the blade-wotsit follows the line,




If it does, it’s fine, if not it’s time for them “fettling” files, or if you have a fixed square, you’ll need what I think AndyT refers to as a “Birmingham screwdriver”.  This square seemed okay for government work, so I went off back to the “workshop”.

“Ladies and Gentlemen please regain your seats as the main feature is about to restart, YOU LOT IN THE BACK ROW GET OUT NOW OR I’LL HAVE THE ROZZERS ON YA!”

Just going out for a walk with the apprentice and his aunty.  I’ve just had a chat with the neighbour over the fence, so I’d better get on with the work soon and stop blathering with you.  See you later, byeee.



Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #56 on: August 23, 2013, 11:53:03 AM »
Hello again peeps!  It’s all gone a bit quiet out there, have I bored you all or have you all gone to work or else found something useful to do instead?

Please just say hello now and again as it’s getting a bit lonely in the “workshop”.  The only company I get is “the apprentice” and his aunty, and they don’t pop in much, and when they do they just end up shouting at the neighbours!

I’ve come on a bit since I last blathered on so let’s see where we are then.  Oh yes, tenons and lap-joint done.  I think I laid the frame out again and this gave me the opportunity to check all the marks were lining up etc, I seem to find the more times I check, the more mistakes I find, I suppose that’s better than finding the mistakes after sharp thing hits wood!  I’d had a bit of a problem trying to square the top beam about the top of the middle post, cos the beam was bowed and I found there was a bit of deformity in the post too.  What I needed, thought I, was a big Austrian, so I popped out to the porch and found him hanging around in a corner behind several years worth of cobwebs. this is the big Austrian here;



I call him the big Austrian (TBA) because…well, he’s over six foot tall and from Austria.  (He’s also fairly well built, spends most of his time leaning against walls and seems pretty quiet and miserable, but I don’t mention that to his face!)

I squared off TBA at the middle post;



 …and then lined everything up.  I could now check the mortices against the end of the tenons and see whether I needed to adjust owt.  This one seems okay, so I marked it with a tick (just need to remember what that means when cutting!);



I then started making chips and dust with the morticer as mentioned somewhere earlier, resulting in;



Just like wot a proper chippie might do with an auger and chisel, only rougher and about twice as slow, I might get quicker with practice!

I’m making the mortices three “chisels” long, cos the chisel is about a third of a timber-width square and I think there’s generally a “rule of thirds” or something when doing mortice and tenons, well it makes sense to me!  The mortices at the end of the beam are two “chisels” long, as the end of the beam is going to be flush with the side of the post.  I don’t want the end or “sides,edges?” of the tenons showing so all these mortices are “blind?” is that the word?, well they don’t go through the whole timber anyway.  This doesn’t leave much “end grain” in the beam, but I’m hoping that won’t be a problem.

Brrrr, Graunch, Whizz, not many minutes later, all the mortices are done.  Next step, fitting the tenons into the holes, or is it fitting the holes around the tenons?

For this I was going to use two chisels, bevel edge ones.  Here’s one I’d prepared earlier;



…and one I hadn’t;



This is me realising the thinner one probably wasn’t up to todays job!;



The second one is essentially as it came when new (these had had the “secondary bevel” cut at the factory, possibly with a mill file!!), apart from where I’d been bashing some wood with a nail in it or something, I think that was when I was “easing” the old back door frame out a couple of years back.  You can also see how well I keep my tools from this shot!!  (okay, I admit it, it was a bit shinier when I got it.  It was also lacquered, but I came up with some good reason to strip that off.  B******d if I can remember what that reason was now, I even stripped off the numbers wot told me how wide they were!  It had better be a b****y good reason is all I can say now!

And this is it after a couple of swipes across a sharpening stone (or two!);



I think the glint of sunlight off the “fettled” bit means it’s approaching “sharp enough”  Here’s a shot in the shade showing it’s not quite as “sharpened” as it could be;



Next step was fitting the mortices to the tenons.  Both chisels were reasonably sharp so only needed a firm push to shave the sides of the hole.  I didn’t need to do much wiggling and took a little bit off at a time.  As the auger in the morticer chisel was a bit proud of the edges of the chisel it had left ridges down the holes, so I only really needed to shave these plus a bit extra on some, depending on how badly I’d butchered the tenon.  I felt it better to shave the holes than the tenon as there was more wood in the mortice lump of wood than in the tenon, though someone who knows what they’re doing may wish to chip in here with better advice.

Most of the mortices were “long?” enough to not need the “ends” shaved, which was lucky, as the thin/narrow? Chisel was a very tight squeeze in the hole.  (eight Swedish chisels, all in metric!  All exactly the wrong size for any proper work!!!).

I’m making a rustic store, so I’m letting most of the tenons go full width of the timber.  If I was more concerned with neatness, I might make the holes (mortices) less long/wide? And shave a tad off the “edges?” of the tenons.  I think this might make the joint look a bit better.

“Oh! You’re here then!!”  This is the “apprentice” again;



He’d taken me for a walk round the park earlier, found one of his balls he’d lost in the fight yesterday and was most pleased to have a pair again!  And then, like most apprentices, mooched off when he was needed and couldn’t be found (I’m sure any trades-people here know exactly what I’m talking about!).  This photo was approaching lunch-time and he’d come to the workshop looking for some Hobnobs.  I’d just asked him to clamp summat up with the handy clamp, he looked down at it, then up at me and said “Wot! Me! With my thumbs, you know I aint gonna be doin’ that!!”

I think it’s time to rest my eyes again, I’ll be back a little later, remember to say hello if you’re still interested.









Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline PeterE

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #57 on: August 23, 2013, 12:16:19 PM »
Oh yes I am still interested!

It will be a well built log store that one. Not many nails or screws needed and still I think it will be well sturdy enough for use.

/Peter
Always at the edge of my abilities, too often beyond ;-)

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #58 on: August 23, 2013, 12:39:43 PM »
Oh yes I am still interested!

It will be a well built log store that one. Not many nails or screws needed and still I think it will be well sturdy enough for use.

/Peter

Thankyou Peter :thumbup:

Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline waggle

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #59 on: August 23, 2013, 04:36:57 PM »
Can't speak for anyone else, but I think you have a great writing style and a good subject.

Butchering the brown stuff has always been a black art to me, you are making it fun to learn.

I will be watching avidly.

Tony

BTW.  Great work so far!

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #60 on: August 23, 2013, 05:12:09 PM »

Butchering the brown stuff has always been a black art to me, you are making it fun to learn.

Tony

BTW.  Great work so far!

Thanks Tony.  The current day job involves making iron filings and swarf, so I'm used to a certain amount of stability in the material.  With wood, particularly pine that's been left out in the rain, you can actually see it move before your eyes!  That creates a different set of rules when trying to fit bits of it together.  Glad you're enjoying it.
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline dsquire

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #61 on: August 23, 2013, 08:10:56 PM »
Ross

You and the apprentice seem to be making good progress. I also like your writing style.  :clap: :clap:

I know what you mean about the difference in stability between metal and wood. Sometimes it can be very frustrating.  :bang: :bang:

Cheers  :beer:
706
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and your better best

Offline mosey

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #62 on: August 23, 2013, 08:45:50 PM »
Hello people

I have just joined this site and am planning to build a timber framed log store for the lady next door.  This is Mark 1 which I made for our house;





I need to rethink the front row of shingles to make them more robust and try to improve the quality of the joints.  She'd also like it to be wider so I'm going to make two bays instead of one (or at least fake it with a middle post).

These are my plans, which should be good enough to make a cutting list and get the job done;



If anyone can see any flaws or omissions please tell me.

I'm thinking of making all the joints in traditional British Timber frame style, pegged with wooden dowel.  It'll be made of pressure treated pine with the odd screw maybe and nails, but no glue.  I'm yet to think about chopping all the mortices by hand or possibly using a bench mortiser.  There's also the option of using a brace and bit or Mr Makita.  I'm in two minds whether to go the full hog and do everything with mandraulics or give in to modernity and use the mighty electron!
I admire the professionalism in your freehand sketches, and I should know. Very nice.
Mosey

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #63 on: August 24, 2013, 02:58:58 AM »
Ross

You and the apprentice seem to be making good progress. I also like your writing style.  :clap: :clap:

706

Thanks again Don.  Being from where you are, you may at least understand some of the "British" humour.  I'm rather hoping most people are missing some of the jokes, they'd be chasing me out of here with a big stick! :wack:
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #64 on: August 24, 2013, 03:19:52 AM »

I admire the professionalism in your freehand sketches, and I should know. Very nice.
Mosey

Thanks for the comment Mosey :thumbup:, I did cheat a bit by doing the sketch freehand in pencil first and then put the ink and marker on after though.  I think I prefer sketching straight in biro.

It sounds like you do a bit of sketching yourself, care to elaborate!

Here's a cartoon I did for my brother last week if you're interested in that sort of thing (If any Greeks are watching, please note this is done with much admiration and not intending to offend!);

Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #65 on: August 24, 2013, 04:18:44 AM »
Now, then youngsters, I popped downstairs to get on with the wotsit, but noticed we’d got more damp in the “workshop”;



I think it’s also spreading near the “climate controlled” storeroom;



Thought I’d have to look into that before carrying on, but decided to turn the heater on instead, to see if that’ll dry it out.

In the meantime, I’ll just “develop” some more photos to show you where I’d got to.  I’m running ahead on the work now and I’ll forget where I am if I’m going to keep you lot up to date!
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #66 on: August 24, 2013, 05:42:26 AM »
Hello again chums, I’ve just got the photos off the dryer, so I can show you a bit more progress.

I seem to remember that I’d “fitted” the holes (sorry, mortices) to the tenons.  The next step was fitting the tenons to the h..mortices.

Due to variations in cack-handedness, some of the tenons needed a minor tap with a hitting-stick, some were push fits and a couple had associated “priest holes” and plopped in with no help at all.  I’ll have to knock up a bit of “wooden shim” to cover those up before the “roundheads” pop round to check.

Remember, as I’m trying to fit each joint separately, this is a bit time consuming, but I’m learning a lot.  I started this job Monday, it’s Saturday now and the total time of wood-bashing has been less than an hour (possibly not more than 10 minutes!).  Hopefully the back frame will go together a lot quicker.

First off, offer the tenon up to the mortice and simply insert (as the chippie said to the Bishop☺).  Making sure that the timbers are level and square.  As I’ve made the tenons long (“It’s easier to take the wood off with a saw than put it back on, so err on the side of caution” I seem to remember being told at night school!), they don’t go all the way and I’ve marked the tenon where it meets the face of the other timber;



What I’m trying to do here is make the tenon fit the hole as fully as possible (“ooh-er missus I don’t know if I’ll be able to achieve that” says Justin Welby, Grief, I just hope he isn’t watching!).   As the joint is going to be pegged, I want as much “end-grain” on the tenon as I can get, so that it doesn’t get “torn out”.  Nextly I transferred the marked line down a bit to give me a line to cut the end off.  I’m using a rule for this, but you don’t need anything so modern, a bit of stick would do. What I did was hold the rule so that one end was on the marked line, I then marked where this met the end of the tenon;



 I’m using some “milling engineer’s adhesive setting shim” here.  (If any “millers’ are watching, I’m using the stuff in the green packets, a true professional uses the blue packets!).  Then I just slide the rule down to where it touches the “shoulder” of the tenon and mark where the “shim” has got to;




I did this both ends of the line, and ruled across between the marks (I think I had a good reason for this at the time but I'm not sure if I got it right now).  I could have squared across, but then I’d have to mark from the bit of the line closest to the tenon shoulder  Then I marked where the waste was and cut the end off the tenon.  REMEMBER, CUT ACROSS THE LINE CLOSEST TO THE END OF THE TENON, NOT THE LINE YOU DREW FIRST!  Don’t ask me how I know this!
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #67 on: August 24, 2013, 07:31:24 AM »

Haunched Tenon:  For the end of the “beam”  I was going to put one of these in the top of the post, so that it was secure and you wouldn’t see much “choppery-pokery”.  I’ve since had a look in me books and all the pictures of these look different to mine!  Hey-ho, with any luck no-one’s going to be poking around in there to see (and if they are I’m gonna have to tell Father O’Reilly to scarper sharpish first!).

I offered the tenon up to the mortice.  I’d left this the full width of the timber, as I can’t remember where I’ve left me glue! Then I marked the width of the h…mortice onto the end of the tenon, remembering to hatch the bit I didn’t want,;






Next I cut the spare bit off  the tenon and I shaved the inside of the mortice as close as any barber round our way(something for the weekend sir?).  The picture shows another mortice, these ones aren’t so long remember;



I could now wiggle the bit of the tenon to see if it would fit in the hole.  It was a bit too long/wide? So I shaved a smidge off with the big Swede (I call him that because he’s bigger than the other chisel…….and he’s from Sweden.  (Great people the Swede’s, but Cross & Blackwell call them Rutabagans?);



Nextly, I bunged the wood in the hole, marked a line, chopped the end off and hey Presto, job done (speaking of which, I’ve not seen a Presto for ages, probably gone the same way as Lyon’s cornerhouse!).

I could now stick the whole thing together to see where I’d gone wrong so far;



Now then, some of you lot weren’t watching properly when I made my lap-joint (“pay to leave?  What do you mean I’ve got to pay to leave?  This is the oddest pub I’ve ever been in, and some of those girls over there are going to catch their death of cold!”), were you?  One of you at least could have told me I’d cut a hole in the wrong side of the bottom beam couldn’t you?  I was b****y chuffed with that joint too.  Never mind, they say pride always precedes a fall, shoulda been paying attention me’self I suppose.

Anyway, I’m still reasonably pleased with all the joints and there’ll be some bodging I can do to save the day with the bottom beam;









Think I’ll tell Toni it’ll look nice with a lick of paint on, it’s only knotty old carcassing after all, so at the end of the day it’s not supposed to be seen anyway.

Ooh it looks like the heater’s dried out the workshop so I can go and start sorting out me braces.  “about time too” says the beloved “you’ve been wandering around all week with your trousies round your knees, with you’re a*** hanging out and your Jockey shorts on display, you look like a flippin teenager you do!”

TTFN See you later.
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline mosey

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #68 on: August 24, 2013, 08:56:00 AM »
Ross,
I recently retired from architectural practise after 50 years and now paint watercolors full-time when not in the shop. I'll be painting in Oxford in 2 weeks. See you there. Also did some cabinet-making.
Mosey

Offline DaveH

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #69 on: August 24, 2013, 09:28:26 AM »
Hi Ross,
Still here, looking and learning although most of it is well beyond my capabilities  :scratch:

My prowess to wood work is the "Two S's" Saw it, Screw it and that's about it  :)
 :beer:
DaveH
(Ex Leicester, Thurmaston, Ashby De La Zouch.)

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #70 on: August 24, 2013, 09:51:08 AM »
Ross,
I recently retired from architectural practise after 50 years and now paint watercolors full-time when not in the shop. I'll be painting in Oxford in 2 weeks. See you there. Also did some cabinet-making.
Mosey

Ah, Oxford?  Is something happening there, I'm new to the site so am not up on much yet?  PeteW, if you're still watching can you fill me in?

It would be great to see you there. If you know anything about ink pen & wash, I'd love to learn that, I've just started using "magic markers" after a long break and I'm sure there must be an easier way to get things done!
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #71 on: August 24, 2013, 09:56:06 AM »
Hi Ross,
Still here, looking and learning although most of it is well beyond my capabilities  :scratch:

My prowess to wood work is the "Two S's" Saw it, Screw it and that's about it  :)
 :beer:
DaveH

Thanks for the appreciation.  You're probably giving me too much credit re capabilities.  I'm learning as much as you doing this, if not more!  I've done a couple or three courses in wood-butchery and knocked up a few bits of stuff round the garden is all.  Like most things in life, I think it's 80% confidence and 5% skill wot gets the job done.  The other 15% is tea, hob-nobs and the manual! :coffee:
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline mosey

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #72 on: August 24, 2013, 10:06:41 AM »
Yes, fond recall. Ice climbing, drinking beer, and nude hiking in the snow. I miss them.

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #73 on: August 24, 2013, 10:19:44 AM »
Yes, fond recall. Ice climbing, drinking beer, and nude hiking in the snow. I miss them.

Hmmm, we have at least one hobby in common then :beer:  I knew a chappie from Gateshead who liked Ice climbing, but being from Gateshead, he'd only put on a long sleeved shirt when the mercury froze in the thermometer.  I'm not a climber, even though I lived in Sheffield for a while, where they're mad for it!  I've walked up Snowden a few times, Ben Wyvis (not Nevis), that tall hillock in the Lake District and I did try hoisting myself up a string in the peaks at Stanage Edge.  I can't even climb a ladder to clean the upstairs windows!
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline mosey

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Re: Log Store
« Reply #74 on: August 24, 2013, 10:29:44 AM »
The chappie I knew was a chappette...Gunilla was her name, from northern Sweden. She taught me to swear as well, in Swedish. This makes me smile :beer: :) :)
Mosey