Author Topic: Casting, safety equipment  (Read 7177 times)

Offline ChadA4MG

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Casting, safety equipment
« on: September 06, 2013, 08:17:24 PM »
Are regular leather welder gloves really not good enough for casting aluminum?   I'm seeing $80 a pair for gloves that aluminized. 
Will a firemens fire jacket be sufficent for protection from the blistering heat or do i need to invest in something else?

What type of boots are preferred, I know they need a steel toe but is there a specific type that is desired?
Where do you buy the face shield with the mesh embedded into it. Seems overkill but maybe I should have 1 for the gas axe too.

Any US suppliers that have better prices on some of this equipment?

I am trying to draw up enough ambition to go sweat my arse off outside to start the furnace build but I wanted to have the safety equipment on hand in case I got a bug up my pant leg and fired it off before being equipped.

Offline S. Heslop

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2013, 10:30:42 PM »


Here's a video on making overshoes I thought was novel, but I'm not sure how it'd hold up against contact with molten metal. It'd melt through the mylar and aluminium pretty quick, and the ceramic blanket looks pretty porous. The whole suit probably just limits mobility and visibility too, creating more of a hazard. Aluminized stuff is for reflecting radiated heat, which could be useful when melting white hot iron, but molten aluminium barely glows. Aluminized gloves might keep your knuckles more comfortable though.

I've read in the past that there aren't really any boots that'd hold up against dropping a crucible of molten metal on them, and difficult to remove boots with fancy soles and steel caps would serve to contain the metal around your foot. Supposedly the foundry boots you can buy are more to stop hot bits of metal from melting up through the soles and reaching your foot if you step on them. It's probably best to just avoid holding the crucible directly over your feet if possible and regular leather shoes would protect from small droplets (and be easier to get off in a hurry).

Offline vtsteam

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2013, 11:16:20 PM »
I doubt you'll get much response if asking what you should do, for obvious liability reasons. Better to ask what other people do, listen to a range of experience, and then decide for yourself.

I'll answer the latter question, in my case. When I melted aluminum, in quantities of under 5 lbs, I did so on a 8" bore charcoal furnace. I always wore an arc welders helmet with clear glass when actually pouring, welding gloves, and a heavy shirt, or jacket if cold, and leather work boots.

I wear considerably more now that I pour iron from a waste oil furnace. Charcoal is much safer than liquid or gas fuels, and aluminum is much lower temp pour than iron. I now wear a full length leather shop apron, leather welders snap on boot covers, and a welding cape, besides the arc welders helmet, and welders gloves.

I don't wear aluminized gear -- the amount of radiant heat generated is shielded well enough by the leather gear, for me.  This isn't a commercial foundry.

But for spills or splatters, leather will not hold up long if iron lands on it. My philosophy is that it has nowhere to stay on with my outfit -- it should roll off of what I am wearing before it has a chance to penetrate. All seams overlap, like roof shingles.

Boots without boot covers are capable of trapping metal on the tongue. The boot protectors cover that up with a smooth leather surface. They aren't expensive -- something like ten bucks. If I'd known about them back when I was just pouring aluminum, I probably would have worn them -- I think foot damage is the most likely danger from a spill, and face shielding is essential for splatters. The hands need radiant protection, but welders gloves seem adequate to me for that.

Again, you have to decide for yourself what is adequate for you. This is just what I do.

I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
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Offline tom osselton

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2013, 02:07:12 AM »
I just picked up a welders split leg type apron and have cowboy boots ( no laces)  and still have  my old leather jacket to wear. I haven't yet picked up a face sheild although in a pinch I could use a welder's helmet. I think the main thing is how full of metal, and how well your tong's fit the saftey should start there.

Offline ChadA4MG

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2013, 12:44:57 AM »
Okay.   I never really paid attention to alum melt temps vs steel when I weld on other one, just enough to know when I got good penetration.  Maybe I'll just go w/ some good boots since I need something rugged I have the covers but havent figured them out on tennis shoes(maybe thats the reason) and some new gloves and other leather things. 

Offline krv3000

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2013, 05:15:14 PM »
well in the good old times they had clogs for working in fawnderys the wooden sole is so thick you wood have to stand in it for ever befor it burnt thruw and the tops was thick lether with lether laces you can still get them but at a price ask john  doubleboost wher he got his clober for casting

lordedmond

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2013, 08:54:02 AM »
How do mean old days they used those clogs ( stores issue ) on the front side of the base exchange units ( blast furnace ) and in the moulding shops in the 1960 at Stanton Iron works, coupled with wool coats with a long tail like a penguin suit to protect the lower back wid and rain but above all metal splashes ( wool will not burn it just smoulders and makes a stink )


so not so long ago

Stuart

Offline S. Heslop

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2013, 11:50:08 AM »
How do mean old days they used those clogs ( stores issue ) on the front side of the base exchange units ( blast furnace ) and in the moulding shops in the 1960 at Stanton Iron works, coupled with wool coats with a long tail like a penguin suit to protect the lower back wid and rain but above all metal splashes ( wool will not burn it just smoulders and makes a stink )


so not so long ago

Stuart

Oh yeah definitely make sure you aren't wearing any cotton or polyester. Cotton burns fast, and polyester melts and sticks to you.

I caught myself on fire wearing a cotton polyester mix shirt while using an angle grinder. I'm lucky I caught it early but it still stuck to my fingers when I patted it out. I've got a few cool scars now where all that plastic was stuck.


Offline mattinker

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2013, 12:27:54 PM »
How do mean old days they used those clogs ( stores issue ) on the front side of the base exchange units ( blast furnace ) and in the moulding shops in the 1960 at Stanton Iron works, coupled with wool coats with a long tail like a penguin suit to protect the lower back wid and rain but above all metal splashes ( wool will not burn it just smoulders and makes a stink )


so not so long ago

Stuart

Oh yeah definitely make sure you aren't wearing any cotton or polyester. Cotton burns fast, and polyester melts and sticks to you.

I caught myself on fire wearing a cotton polyester mix shirt while using an angle grinder. I'm lucky I caught it early but it still stuck to my fingers when I patted it out. I've got a few cool scars now where all that plastic was stuck.


Forty years ago, I used to buy steel workers clogs, they sold for a pound a pair in Camarthen market (Wales), they were great, steel toe caps hobnail boot  uppers with a wooden sole! I wish I could get them now. Amongst other things, they were very good on ladders, standing on a flat surface.

I wouldn't go as far as ruling out cotton, it's the polyester that melts

Regards, Matthew

Offline vtsteam

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2013, 02:24:16 PM »
Haven't caught any shirts on fire (yet -- never say never), and don't usually wear polyester, but good information to know.

I do wear welding gloves when using a hand grinder. Saves a few personal nicks, and mistaken grabs of hot metal. And probably would have helped in putting out the shirt fire.

Sounds like wool is the way to go.
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
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Offline S. Heslop

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2013, 03:19:53 PM »
I wouldn't go as far as ruling out cotton, it's the polyester that melts

Regards, Matthew

From what I read, it's supposedly difficult to set polyester on fire on its own, but cotton sets fire relatively easy. The blend of the two combines both features into a dangerous mix.

Offline awemawson

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2013, 03:32:13 PM »
I have polyester cotton workshop / warehouse coat for the machine shop, but a brown pure cotton one for the welding shop for exactly that reason - nasty burns that stick like s@@@ to a blanket. Just infact replaced it and had quite a bit of difficulty finding pure cotton.
Andrew Mawson
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Offline mattinker

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2013, 04:10:04 PM »


From what I read, it's supposedly difficult to set polyester on fire on its own, but cotton sets fire relatively easy. The blend of the two combines both features into a dangerous mix.

I'm not so much afraid of things catching fire as getting burnt from contact with molten plastic! Molten metal doesn't need to set things on fire to burn you. I prefer heavy cotton to polyester mixes. For foundry work I have an ankle length leather apron, a leather short cape (both made from a cow skin rug I found in the rubbish!) leather spats  (over boots) high temperature leather gauntlets and a full face shield. For welding it's the leather apron again, long sleeve cotton "T" shirt (UV protection) cotton Bib and Brace (US Bib overalls) and welders gauntlets. If I don't use the apron whilst using my angle grinders, cotton sweat shirts, end up with holes, I've yet to set cotton on fire!

Regards, Matthew

Offline ChadA4MG

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #13 on: September 11, 2013, 03:02:24 PM »
I usually only wear polyester when I'm on the mountain bike. 

I'll refrain from wearing cotton blends though.  I had another heat stroke a month ago because what i thought I was wearing was a cotton shirt turned out to be 60/40 poly/cotton blend, sucked the water out of me and held in the heat. :palm:  I have cotton sleeves that are fire retarded.

I never thought about split leg apron, good ideas are found here.
Havent seen wooden clogs in a size 13 mens, muchless have I seen them outside of a historical display, No one knows what an ash can is around here.   

Offline vtsteam

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #14 on: September 11, 2013, 08:19:16 PM »

For foundry work I have an ankle length leather apron, a leather short cape (both made from a cow skin rug I found in the rubbish!) leather spats  (over boots) high temperature leather gauntlets and a full face shield.

Matthew, sounds like we wear exactly the same outfit -- although i didn't make mine! Good work.  :thumbup:

ChadA4MG you guys have kinda got me wondering about gluing on a sheathing of plywood to the bottom of some old workboots I have. Yeah, okay, I've gone off the deep end......  :loco:
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
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Offline Chuck in E. TN

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #15 on: September 12, 2013, 01:55:51 AM »
well in the good old times they had clogs for working in fawnderys the wooden sole is so thick you wood have to stand in it for ever befor it burnt thruw and the tops was thick lether with lether laces you can still get them but at a price ask john  doubleboost wher he got his clober for casting
Well, John, what is your casting clober?
Chuck
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Offline doubleboost

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #16 on: September 12, 2013, 04:45:29 PM »
Hi
Lads
If you have watched any of my videos you will notice I take casting safety seriously
Most of my safety gear came from car boot sales & ebay
Starting at the top
Flame retardant balaclava (ebay)
Full face visor (ebay)
The orange overalls are made from flame retardant nomex (boot sale)
Leather welding coat (ebay)
Leather arm protectors (boot sale)
Nice leather / reflective welding gloves (boot sale)
Leather foundry type boot steel toes and a steel plate in the sole  slip on no laces (boot sale)
I would like a full length leather apron
In this high tech world simple cow skin gets the job done
When I am casting I have a hose pipe ready and a bucket full of water (well away from the molten metal)
All tools and ingot moulds that come in to contact with molten metal
Are considerd wet unless they have been pre heated
John

Offline ChadA4MG

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #17 on: September 12, 2013, 09:29:06 PM »
Hi
Lads
If you have watched any of my videos you will notice I take casting safety seriously
Most of my safety gear came from car boot sales & ebay
Starting at the top
Flame retardant balaclava (ebay)
Full face visor (ebay)
The orange overalls are made from flame retardant nomex (boot sale)
Leather welding coat (ebay)
Leather arm protectors (boot sale)
Nice leather / reflective welding gloves (boot sale)
Leather foundry type boot steel toes and a steel plate in the sole  slip on no laces (boot sale)
I would like a full length leather apron
In this high tech world simple cow skin gets the job done
When I am casting I have a hose pipe ready and a bucket full of water (well away from the molten metal)
All tools and ingot moulds that come in to contact with molten metal
Are considerd wet unless they have been pre heated
John
Car boot sale, is that a car parts sale or yard sale. 

Believe it or not you are part of the reason I had questions about safety stuffs, I saw one of the videos and the orange suit. But I couldn't remember who the video belonged to.  I'm trying to do too many things at once, I dont always remember everything.

Offline vtsteam

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2013, 09:50:37 PM »
Car boot sale, is that a car parts sale or yard sale. 

Always wondered -- I think it's like a flea market here, but substituting car trunks for booths?
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
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Rob.Wilson

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #19 on: September 13, 2013, 04:21:41 AM »
Hi Lads

Car boot sale , or if it were in the USA ,auto mobile  trunk sale  :)  ,,,,,,,,,,,,, basically you pitch up in your car and sell any old crap you have , basically its like 200 house holds having a yard sale in a field .


Bollocks to this casing safety gear  lark ,  :lol: :lol:     




Rob

Offline vtsteam

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #20 on: September 13, 2013, 09:04:48 AM »
Wow, 200 households -- good idea!  :thumbup: Wish we had them here.

How do they get started/organized?  :dremel:

I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
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Offline awemawson

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Re: Casting, safety equipment
« Reply #21 on: September 13, 2013, 09:16:11 AM »
You put a big sign up by the road advertising a 'Boot Sale' on the coming (usually) Sunday morning. You charge sellers about 10-15 per pitch. You charge a 1 entrance fee per car for buyers. You pay a few kids in yellow jackets to marshal the traffic on the field, put a few 45 gallon drums around as liter bins.

Then you work out what to do with the loot while the local authority works out how to stop you doing it again.
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex