Author Topic: My new foundry  (Read 17671 times)

Offline NormanV

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #25 on: October 03, 2013, 09:31:05 AM »
The lid is complete, there is a good seal around the edges. I know that it won't affect the performance of the furnace but it will prevent surprises when I am standing next to it.
I obtained 60kg of scrap aluminium castings today, the crucibles are being welded today also.
I will be doing my first melt this weekend. I will be using charcoal as a fuel as I have spent enough already over the last few weeks and a gas cylinder will have to wait.
I'll just be making ingots at first as I still have to get the sand and also make some flasks.

Offline vtsteam

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #26 on: October 03, 2013, 09:37:06 AM »
Norman I know you've cast already so pretty sure you already know this, but if not, take a thin sliver off of those wheels and other castings and try to light those individually with a torch to see if they burn white -- a check for magnesium. Apologies for the presumption if you already have done this, or know about it.
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
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Offline NormanV

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #27 on: October 03, 2013, 02:10:27 PM »
 I will check them but I am pretty sure that they are not magnesium. I've only ever used wheels in the past and never had a problem but there is always a first time.
thanks, Norman

Offline NormanV

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #28 on: October 04, 2013, 04:25:07 PM »
My next task is to obtain some sand for making my moulds. The two suppliers that I have located charge 15 for 25kg. That is not much sand for the money! Can anyone suggest a supplier in UK that are cheaper and won't charge an arm and a leg for delivery? I am not even sure how much I will need, my biggest moulding box will be 30" x 12" x 8", what weight of sand will I need to fill that? As I understand it I need sharp sand, the grains of sand from the beach will be too rounded, is that correct?
When I was casting before I used sand from the local sand dunes and bentonite cat litter, it worked fine.
Norman

Offline awemawson

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #29 on: October 04, 2013, 04:45:27 PM »
Conventionally Mansfield sand is used in the UK being a self bonding sand with good porosity and refractory properties. Have you tried John Winter in Halifax?
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline vtsteam

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #30 on: October 04, 2013, 05:34:47 PM »
I am not even sure how much I will need, my biggest moulding box will be 30" x 12" x 8", what weight of sand will I need to fill that?

About 170 lbs dry if you'll be mixing in clay. If using pre-mixed greensand and with moisture, figure on 200 lbs. But you'd be well advised to have more on hand than will fill the flask.
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
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Offline NormanV

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #31 on: October 05, 2013, 11:38:05 AM »
Andrew, I had seen the John Winter website but unfortunately he does not list prices, come to that nor do Mansfield sand. I will give them both a ring on Monday. thank you for the info.
Steve, thanks for the figures, 4 bags of 25kg will do it then.
I live right next to a sandy beach, it is so tempting!
Norman

Offline awemawson

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #32 on: October 05, 2013, 11:42:43 AM »
When I used to travel around the country muchly for my job I called into John Winters several times to collect stuff - very friendly and helpful. But this meant that the carriage cost was zero (unless you count the wear and tear to the company car with several sack of sand in the boot  :ddb: ) I seem to remember that the approach to their place is up a very steep hill - but then most of outlying Halifax is up a steep hill come to think about it !)

If the sand on your beach is nice and fine why don't you consider the sodium silicate process. Dry sand, add up to 4% by weight of sodium silicate, mix well then pass CO2 through it. Sets nice and hard but permeable. It's total loss as far as the sand is concerned but then you have the beach ! JW stock sodium silicate. When I was last casting I mainly used silver sand and sodium silicate as it saves faffing about with collapsing moulds! Mind you the garden was starting to fill up with the detritus of knocked out moulds!
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline NormanV

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #33 on: October 05, 2013, 12:35:13 PM »
I suppose I won't know if it is any good unless I try it. There are dunes at the top of the beach where the sea doesn't reach so it shouldn't be so salty. I'll gat some sodium silicate and give it a try.
Norman

Offline DavidA

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #34 on: October 05, 2013, 01:15:40 PM »
Norman,

This may be of interest to you.

http://mistralni.co.uk/products/sodium-silicate-solution-q70

Dave.

By the way,  how did the first firing go ?

Now the flue is abating I will be over to collect the bits next Saturday.

Offline vtsteam

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #35 on: October 05, 2013, 02:12:55 PM »
Well, if it was me, and the sand looked good and fine I'd go get some, mix it with some bentonite and cast someting small to see how it worked. Why not?
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
www.sredmond.com

Offline NormanV

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #36 on: October 05, 2013, 03:19:39 PM »
There's probably some bylaw about taking sand from the beach, I will have to be discrete.
I haven't done a firing, can't find any charcoal!!!!!
Glad you're feeling better Dave, see you next weekend.
Norman

Offline awemawson

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #37 on: October 05, 2013, 04:08:12 PM »
Usually from high tide mark down to the sea is common land, and from high tide mark up to first property boundary, field etc belongs to the Crown. You could always reverse the WWii  POW trick where they lost sand from bags down their trousers - just don't release the knot :)
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline vtsteam

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #38 on: October 05, 2013, 04:40:44 PM »
There's probably some bylaw about taking sand from the beach, I will have to be discrete.

Well, for just a test of the usefulness, maybe even just a quart container or two would do, or a small child's bucket. Can't imagine anyone would have a hard time with that. Now if you brought a wheelbarrow and started carting loads to a pickup truck, I imagine there might be some nitpickers aroused.

Who was it -- someone here, I think, was bringing out sand from a beach in their shoes. Must have taken a lot of trips to the car.
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
www.sredmond.com

Offline awemawson

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #39 on: October 05, 2013, 05:01:41 PM »
Safest way is a tipper truck with rotating yellow flashing beacon, and wear high viz jacket with 'EU Beach Sampling Team' on the back. Take as much as you want and I'm willing to bet NOBODY would challenge you !   :clap:
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline vtsteam

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #40 on: October 05, 2013, 05:25:52 PM »
How about "Decontamination Unit" if there are too many bathers about?
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
www.sredmond.com

Offline SwarfnStuff

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #41 on: October 06, 2013, 01:58:27 AM »
Sand from the beach? Here in OZ they probably have a law requiring a permit for the sand in your shoes when you leave the beach. Understandable really  :lol: considering we only have 35,887km of coastline on the mainland and another 23,895km round our islands = 59,736km altogether. (depending on how you measure the coastline.) That's 37,119miles in the old (more familiar to many of us) measurements. Wonder how many sackfulls that would be?  :smart: Ah well, what were we discussing again? Oh yes Awemawson's new foundry. :coffee:
Converting good metal into swarf sometimes ending up with something useful. ;-)

Offline awemawson

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #42 on: October 06, 2013, 02:29:56 AM »
No not MY new foundry - it's NormanV's new foundry.

My foundry is still all packed away after a move six year ago, now where are those 'roundtuits'  :scratch:
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline vtsteam

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #43 on: October 06, 2013, 10:16:10 AM »
Norman, sorry, back to the subject, how will you roll your largest flask of about 100 kilos? Or will that particular pattern not require a roll?
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
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Offline NormanV

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #44 on: October 06, 2013, 01:52:12 PM »
I haven't thought about that yet! I might get some help or make some sort of crane.
Norman

Offline vtsteam

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #45 on: October 06, 2013, 02:54:48 PM »
Norman, maybe some kind of rolling frame? Like two plywood disks with a rectangular cutout in the center?

Maybe it is split, and latches together to do the roll, then latches are released to lift the cope?
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
www.sredmond.com

Offline awemawson

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #46 on: October 06, 2013, 03:28:47 PM »
I ran a 10x6 rsj across the roof of my last foundry and had a trolley running on it with a chain block.Not only useful for lifting large crucibles, and pouring them, it was handy for lifting the furnace, which I had in a pit in the floor. You could easily jury rig something similar over your furnace. A horizontal scaffold pole and runner would probably be enough with an 'A' frame either side.
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline NormanV

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #47 on: October 06, 2013, 04:29:56 PM »
Up to now the biggest casting I have made is the bed for the Gingery lathe, most of the castings for my milling machine will be around that size so I know that I will be able to handle them. It is only the main table that is so big that it will be a problem. It will need to be rolled twice, I was thinking of fitting a pivot each end of the flask and support it with a frame similar to what Andrew is suggesting.
I am intrigued by Steve's idea but it sounds as though it would need a lot of space to roll it over, which I don't have. I am going to build a moulding bench that will have to live outdoors. First I have to find some old pallets that I can dismantle for the timber.
Norman

Offline vtsteam

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #48 on: October 06, 2013, 05:06:36 PM »
Norman, another possibility is to make your bed in a couple of pieces rather than one, with flanges that bolt together. The flanges will actually help stiffness and act as webs. If it's anything like the Gingery, it will scraped (or milled) after, and then be covered with a full length slab of cold rolled steel anyway. It will easily be as strong and stiff as a full length bed, and the molding, melting and casting will all be easier.
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
www.sredmond.com

Offline SwarfnStuff

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Re: My new foundry
« Reply #49 on: October 07, 2013, 02:27:28 AM »
OOPS My error. Didn't look far enough into the posting.  :hammer: Apologies to both Awemawson  NormanV. Better get me glasses checked - Again.  :doh:

John B
Converting good metal into swarf sometimes ending up with something useful. ;-)