Author Topic: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox  (Read 28222 times)

Offline awemawson

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #25 on: October 05, 2013, 02:55:10 PM »
Ross, you are welcome to run your plane irons and chisels through my Viceroy Sharpedge any time you want. Dead easy to get a good sharp and square edge on them.

Andrew
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East Sussex

Offline vtsteam

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #26 on: October 05, 2013, 05:43:49 PM »
Take your cupped board and lay it cup side down on the lawn in the sun for about half an hour and check it. Repeat until straight.

I don't know whether it is traditional for Japanese tool chests, but oil based paint or varnish does wonders to stabilize wood, For obvious reasons, water based paints aren't a good idea if you are having this kind of trouble.

Next time when picking out lumber for this kind of wide flat use, look for quarter sawn grain (vertical bands, end on) rather than flitch sawn (horizontal), or as close as you can get.

Fast growth hard pine will tend to warp more than better woods, also.
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
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Offline Pete49

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #27 on: October 05, 2013, 11:09:49 PM »
here I was thinking I have had a bad week and then I read your tales of woe and now my week doesn't seem so bad :beer:. I can see that you drive nails just like me ....do you borrow my hammer while I'm asleep? Keep at it its been an entertaining read so far.
Pete
oops..........oh no.........blast now I need to redo it

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #28 on: October 08, 2013, 12:08:14 PM »
Very little to report so far.  Motivation levels are at a low ebb, not helped by having 35quids worth of stone commit Hari-Kiri.  The edges of the cracks have crumbled too much for a glue-back-together exercise so it’s now relegated to the kitchen knife and axe department.

The other end cap for the tray was suffering from a little too enthusiastic paring so was suffering from a Positional Instability Slope Situation :doh: :Doh:;



so I inserted a bit of angled wood shim;



…threw some glue at it and bashed some pins in;



Even though all the side and end bits were supposed to be uniform in width etc, there’s a fair amount of not-quite-the –right-size-when-put-together-ness but nothing that a pass or two with a plane or flame-thrower won’t solve.  I shall return if motivation picks up, really shouldn’t take too long to finish this, should it? :scratch:
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline vtsteam

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #29 on: October 08, 2013, 03:04:33 PM »
That's a tough one. The point of everything is to enjoy yourself. And the only way to learn a difficult skill is to make mistakes. If you can't enjoy even those mistakes, the desire to continue can disappear.

When learning to draw as an artist, you do rapid gesture drawings of say 1 minute each on newsprint. You don't attach to them. If they come out badly, who cares, you just do another one in the next minute, then another, then another. Gradually and eventually something good comes out of it. And you find facility. And your drawing gets better until you surprise yourself -- it starts to become unconscious and innate as an ability.

But if you start out trying to draw a figure like Davinci did, buy the most expensive paper, and supplies and just go at it as the only shot you have, and it goes badly, as it will, that can stop you in your tracks, and discourage you from actually acquiring skills.

Why not try taking your shelf apart, and cutting it down into a smaller box with thinner but straight sides. You will find a use for it, but besides that, just think of it as a practice piece. It isn't important. What is important is learning.

And then after that, try again to make a shelf with some new lumber. You will have had more practice by then, and will be aware of the potential problems in planing sawing and making fits. And when finished with it you will satisfy yourself about the quality of what you do and your own abilities. And you will have a good shelf, too.

Taking care of your own enjoyment and pride in your work is much more important than any other aspect of acquiring a skill. Your mistakes are okay, just part of learning, and convertible into something else.

If you can maintain enjoyment in learning, everything else will follow.
I love it when a Plan B comes together!
Steve
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Offline dsquire

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #30 on: October 08, 2013, 06:14:28 PM »
Ross

I fully agree 100% with what Steve just posted. Enjoy the work, it's the journey that's important. In the end you will have that nice tool box that every one will be envious of.  :clap: :clap:

I myself am more of a woodworker that a metal worker, but I enjoy both. I enjoy the journey and the compliments when it is finished. I was always taught that "Haste makes waste" so try to slow it down and plan and double check before making a cut.  :smart: :coffee: :smart: :coffee:  :thumbup: 
:D :D

Cheers  :beer:

Don

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and your better best

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #31 on: October 09, 2013, 04:22:19 AM »
Thanks for the encouragement and advice Don and Steve :thumbup:

My motivation issues are caused by nasty and protracted issues with my employer :(, not the toolbox, which is one of the few things still keeping me sane :med:.  My current approach is that by making mistakes I am learning all the time and actually enjoying overcoming these.  The other thing is that I'm trying to use as few tools as possible in a primitive environment, which I think makes me less careful than if I were in a workshop with bench etc.  I don't think the tray (shelf) is going badly and looks like it'll do what was intended.  My perfectionist side may wince at a couple of errors along the way, but the whole project is generally as good as, if not better than I could have expected.  Hopefully others are enjoying the journey as much as me.

Ross
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline redshift

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #32 on: October 09, 2013, 04:55:06 AM »
Ross, love you style of writing and the humour!  Have you thought of making a youtube video of your projects, I am sure they would
complement Doubleboost's  productions down to a tee.
Best of luck with the employment issues, don't let the barstewards grind you down !!
Regards
Dave

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #33 on: October 11, 2013, 01:45:56 PM »
Once again not a lot of progress.  The Hampshire Monsoon started at lunch time, but at least Hurricanes Hardly Ever Happen Round here (or so they say).  However, I did finish the main body of the tray;





that’s the detail of the b********d corner.  I put a couple of strips of quadrant in, wot I found hiding in the outhouse, this’ll support the tray;



…and luckily the tray fits in;



….I’m sure I don’t need to show you the spacer I had to fit in to stop the tray falling through due to miscockulation on the width of it!  We’ll take it as read that that was “planned”.

…one hand braided handle later;



……. and I think we’re on the final straight.  Must admit, it’s getting a bit heavy now, not sure if I’ll be able to pick it up with tools in it, but we can’t have everything can we?

Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #34 on: October 11, 2013, 05:40:19 PM »
Ross, you are welcome to run your plane irons and chisels through my Viceroy Sharpedge any time you want. Dead easy to get a good sharp and square edge on them.

Andrew

Andrew, I've just remembered.  I tried to make one of these myself a few years ago.  It involved my gramophone (record player), a glass platter, double sided carpet tape and some wet n' dry.  Dare I say it was not particularly effective, even when left overnight.
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline awemawson

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #35 on: October 11, 2013, 05:46:11 PM »
Ross you'll not be dissapointed with this one. When I got it I couldn't stop the builder I was employing at the time playing with it. I reckon it sharpened all his chisels and plane irons, his mates, his cousins and his lost uncle from Botswana !
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #36 on: October 11, 2013, 06:02:46 PM »
Ross you'll not be dissapointed with this one. When I got it I couldn't stop the builder I was employing at the time playing with it. I reckon it sharpened all his chisels and plane irons, his mates, his cousins and his lost uncle from Botswana !

We had one at night school, I believe that was used by all the students, their mates, their mates mates, their cousins, their cousins mates, their cousins cousins and lots of "uncles" from Botswana (and several from British West Hartlepool).  By the time I got to use it, large clouds of smoke poured out of the cupboard at the bottom and it got "locked off" for several months.  Admittedly, most items of machinery I use tend to have large amounts of smoke pour out of them.  I can't even borrow a lighter without it going SNAFU.  My mate Phil at work believes that no matter how "idiot proof" you can make an item, natural selection brings me along to prove evolution will always produce a better idiot!!
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #37 on: October 11, 2013, 07:06:01 PM »
Hennyway, a few days ago this appeared in the hallway;



I believe it is some form of sisal twine.  Somehow SWMBO had been prescient and realised I’d need some form of handles for the toolbox and provided the aforementioned.  I had been thinking of various clever ways of making a handle for the chisel tray, toying with articulated ebony swivels, self-locking iron handles, specially routed lengths of pine etc. etc. etc.  But the obvious and most simple solution was;



….braided twine.  Simple, minimalist, natural, ecologically friendly, vegan and carbon neutral(ish).  So braid, braid, braid and;



two tray handles, to match;



…two box handles. 

Strangely enough the beloved came home this evening, obviously having had a brain-storm and forgetting her original revelation to say “Have you seen the string I got for work?  What’s that, what are you doing with my string!!!”
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #38 on: October 12, 2013, 12:08:11 PM »
Well then, crumbs.   Somehow, without really thinking about it, I seem to have finished.  Not sure how that happened but I’ll not complain.  First of all I bashed some pins into some odd bits and quadrant to make a divider for the saws and little wotsits to hold the planes in place;



Then I realised I could start putting things in it;



..a couple of planes;



…6 saws and;



..before I knew it I was bunging all sorts of stuff in.  Then I bashed a bit of quadrant and a bit of scrap in the tray to keep the chisels in one place and;



…lookee here, a double decker “more room up top, move along the bus please!”.  Finally here’s a shot with all the tools used;



The battery drill and anything to the right are luxuries which weren’t really essential, plus I could have got away with using only one plane, so you don’t really need all that many tools.

Thanks for watching and all the support.  I’m thinking of getting the two bits of rough cut oak out for the next project.  Might chat again.
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline dsquire

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #39 on: October 12, 2013, 12:45:53 PM »
Ross

It is almost a shame to see this project come to an end. It has been a very enjoyable read and a few laughs. On top of that we have learned a tip or two. I know that I will be watching for your next project and I am sure many other MadModders will be as well.  :thumbup: :thumbup: :clap:
:D :D

Cheers  :beer:

Don
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and your better best

Offline awemawson

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #40 on: October 12, 2013, 12:50:09 PM »
Well done Ross, another enjoyable journey  :thumbup:
Andrew Mawson
East Sussex

Offline Joules

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #41 on: October 12, 2013, 12:50:49 PM »
My wood work always comes in handy around this time of year....  Soon be November Dad is the usual comment  :poke:

        Joules
Just get doing and make swarf, you can decide what its going to be later.   :thumbup:

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #42 on: October 12, 2013, 01:14:52 PM »
Thanks for the kind comments everyone :thumbup:, I'm glad you're enjoying it as much as I am.

Joules, I presume you'll be making a Guy to go on your projects like me :headbang:!
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline mattinker

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #43 on: October 12, 2013, 02:42:01 PM »
Ross,

I've been enjoying your venturing into the realms of wood!

One little thing, planes should never be left on their blades, when working, lay them down on their sides when not in use. I don't want to spoil your layout in the box, so how about a small block of wood under one end so the "Irons" don't touch the bottom?

I'm sure your going to find a new project to amuse us with, all the best, Matthew

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #44 on: October 12, 2013, 03:19:35 PM »
Thanks for the comment Matthew :thumbup:.

I always try and retract the blade before storing a plane, I lay them on their sides in use.  I had thought of little blocks under the planes, but I'm very tight on clearance at the top, so the intention is to chisel a rebate for the "mouth" in case I forget.  Actually two rebates, so the planes can go in either way round.
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?

Offline Stilldrillin

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #45 on: October 12, 2013, 03:51:20 PM »
Well done Ross!  :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

I really enjoyed the journey, and the entertaining commentary....... Thank you!  :thumbup:

David D
David.

Still drilling holes... Sometimes, in the right place!

Still modifying bits of metal... Occasionally, making an improvement!

Offline SwarfnStuff

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #46 on: October 13, 2013, 01:05:50 AM »
A Most enjoyable, informative, and well written journey into the realms of sawdust and shavings. The rebates sound a good idea, cos you will forget to retract the blade one day. That is if you're anything like me who says to himself, "Self, Don't forget to slacken off the drive belt on the mill when you finish today". Then gets busy doing other stuff.). :doh:  incidentally, do you need a hand trolley to move it all when full???? Thanks again for the post.

John B
Converting good metal into swarf sometimes ending up with something useful. ;-)

Offline mattinker

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #47 on: October 13, 2013, 04:28:23 AM »
Thanks for the comment Matthew :thumbup:.

I always try and retract the blade before storing a plane, I lay them on their sides in use.  I had thought of little blocks under the planes, but I'm very tight on clearance at the top, so the intention is to chisel a rebate for the "mouth" in case I forget.  Actually two rebates, so the planes can go in either way round.

I suspect that you know more about wood working than your letting on!  But there would be no fun in it otherwise!

Regards, Matthew.

Offline PekkaNF

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #48 on: October 13, 2013, 06:33:16 AM »
 Ok, it startted as a japanese style toolbox and became general philosophy to the love of this art! Great journey.

Only thing I wonder: Do you need a forklift to lift that? Then you probably should resort to correctly rated slings and lifting eye bolts :lol:

I'll get hernia just looking it. I didn't realize it is so large and loaded with iron ore.....japanese planes tend to made out pf wood.

Pekka

Offline RossJarvis

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Re: How not to make a Japanese style toolbox
« Reply #49 on: October 13, 2013, 07:55:21 AM »
Thank you for your comments Pekka, Matthew and John :thumbup:

Good Idea, Pekka, I wonder if I can make a forklift out of wood?  Alternatively I can stick wagon wheels on it and harness up the "apprentice".  I am considering Japanese planes for lightness.  If I stick my other four metal planes in, I can imagine that box aint going nowhere. 

Matthew, I'll admit to knowing some stuff about woodwork from books and night school, but I'm currently trying to convert the "head knowledge" into hand skills and practical working.  That's the hard bit and I have a long way to go.  The ideal would to be like an old school Japanese Carpenter (see Toshio Odate's books), where you turn up with six tools in a box and then build an entire wooden house, perfectly executed, without plans.  I realised I'd become a collector of tools and hardly ever got round to using them.  I'm now trying to work on the minimum number of tools I can get away with and maximise their use (or at least use them!).  Not having a shed is a bit of a hindrance.

John, you're supposed to slacken the mill drive belt :Doh:  I'd got as far as forgetting to slacken the vises and lathe tailstock locks.
Procrastination; now is that an art or a craft skill?