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91
Project Logs / Re: Little lathe tool grinder.
« Last post by dvbydt on June 13, 2018, 05:20:48 PM »
Andrew - Did they give you a cup of coffee?
Ian
92
Project Logs / Re: Building a New Lathe
« Last post by awemawson on June 13, 2018, 04:58:36 PM »
Can you not re-arrange so that the pulley is at one end, and just turn down the bar to suit the pulley bore ?
93
Project Logs / Re: Building a New Lathe
« Last post by vtsteam on June 13, 2018, 04:53:56 PM »
I was curious to see how much skin was left, so I decided to pull the bearing cap off and have a look. Quite a lot, since there were hollows in the core impression. 

So I got out a Dremel and chucked up a carbide burr, and went at all the grainy looking areas I could find. When I put the cap back and resumed boring, I noticed a definite cutting improvement. I'm still sharpening the bit frequently,  but not as much, and the cuts are a little deeper and more consistent, end to end.

Next improvement I'm contemplating is making a new 3/4" boring bar to replace the 5/8" one I started with. There wasn't clearance for anything bigger to start, but now that the bore is much larger I can move up in size. A larger bar will mean I have to also bore the pulley to fit it, but I judge there's enough hub to do that.

3/4" would be the limit for hardware store pulleys though.

Getting there.....
94
Tools / Re: Edgwick lathe
« Last post by mattinker on June 13, 2018, 04:50:35 PM »


The Edgwick uses a unique (I think) chuck mounting system which means finding ready-to-go chucks will be a challenge. You'll almost certainly need to machine up your own backplate if you do want to put a new chuck on it. The spindle bore is a #16 Jarno (I think, somewhere around there anyway) taper, which is also unusual, and rules out buying MT spindle accessories unless you can find or make a sleeve.

Chucks are easy to mount, a 15mm, 9/16 steel plate is all you need to make an adapter. The spindle taper an Edgwick proprietry taper, a morse taper 6 can be modified to fit.

If you do buy it, we'll have to speak to Eric about setting up an "Edgwick Mk1 Owner's Club", I think there's a few of us now...

I like the Edgewick owners section!

Regards, Matthew
95
New from Old / Re: The Sequel - Oh Blimey I bought a CNC Lathe (Beaver TC 20)
« Last post by seadog on June 13, 2018, 04:50:30 PM »
I used to do the same with DEC VT220 keyboards. That, and repairing the silver track on mylar which, due to a design 'fault' used to rub through. RS silver loaded paint was an excellent product.
96
Project Logs / Re: Little lathe tool grinder.
« Last post by awemawson on June 13, 2018, 04:39:07 PM »
I went next door so I could see the whole picture  :lol:
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New from Old / Re: The Sequel - Oh Blimey I bought a CNC Lathe (Beaver TC 20)
« Last post by awemawson on June 13, 2018, 04:33:59 PM »
Years ago we took on the support of all Eastern Electricity Board's white goods distribution system - loads of terminals in shops and offices.

We used to put their faulty keyboards through the dishwasher, taking them out after the rinse but before the dry cycle. They then went into the equivalent of an airing cupboard for a few days. The vast majority worked after this treatment  :thumbup:

(I learnt this trick during recruitment interviews - I'd placed a 'staff wanted' advert in the paper in the town where the previous maintainer was based, and of course attracted several of their employees. More than one of them revealed this trick, which we shamelessly copied  :clap: )

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Project Logs / Re: Little lathe tool grinder.
« Last post by vtsteam on June 13, 2018, 04:27:12 PM »
dvbyvt, that looks handy. How do you lock the grinder in position?

(ps. smaller photo would help -- 800 pixels across max is suggested for this forum -- I can only see a bit at a time while scrolling)
99
New from Old / Re: The Sequel - Oh Blimey I bought a CNC Lathe (Beaver TC 20)
« Last post by Pete. on June 13, 2018, 04:21:33 PM »
Washing it might work, the trouble is you don't know how long for.

A few weeks ago a guy at work spilt a whole large cup of coffee onto his gaming laptop. He took it to a repair shop and they pronounced it non-repairable, all it had was a single red flashing led when you tried to power it. They couldn't even get it started to allow him to recover files plus the keyboard was integrated into the chassis so that was non-removable too and obviously full of dried-up sticky coffee.
I carefully pulled off all the keys and popped all the plastic moulding pins to get the coffee out of the keyboard, but the board still would not start. In desperation I washed it (the motherboard) in the kitchen sink by squeezing out a sponge wetted with very hot water and scrubbing the whole board off with the damp sponge, then I left it under a heat lamp to dry. After that it fired right up, and it is still running weeks later, though it does tend to get hotter than it did before.
100
Project Logs / Re: Little lathe tool grinder.
« Last post by dvbydt on June 13, 2018, 04:17:14 PM »
Thanks for the interest.
Decided to make a dedicated grinding "cupboard". The venerable Wolf double ended grinder is mounted on a pair of drawer slides so that I can pull it out and lock it in position when polishing on the right hand side (Beartex wheel). Slides are cheap enough to replace if the dust ruins them.
At the back is a fishtail from my Vax vacuum to keep the dust flow away from me.
Lighting is provided by four LEDs - G9 base 240 volt 5W 340 lm. Plenty of almost shadowless light (and ideal for extracting miniscule brass splinters!).
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